History - what interests you?
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17-04-2013, 04:39 PM
RE: History - what interests you?
The mods are on the fence about creating a history sub-forum. They have suggested that people start creating threads on history so they can gauge whether such a forum would be worthwhile. Therefore, I am resurrecting this thread in the hopes that enough people will reply and help make history sub-forum a reality.
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17-04-2013, 05:09 PM
RE: History - what interests you?
(18-06-2011 08:18 PM)Lilith Pride Wrote:  My favorite tribe to read about is the Ainu, I like reading anthropological studies of tribes. I also enjoy most pre-gun warfare. I dislike the addition of guns. I haven't read into mythologies in a long time outside of within anthropological studies.

I love learning about (personally preferenced, ofcourse) history. Warfare is a big one for me, too. But don't hold early guns up too high. They were less effective at one point than crossbows. And before guns became powerful enough, smiths would still make knightly armor, and shoot a bullet into the lower part of the torso portion of it to create a slight dent, so the guy buying the armor could see his suit was "bullet proof", and they were for a time!
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18-04-2013, 02:07 AM
RE: History - what interests you?
(17-04-2013 04:39 PM)ghostexorcist Wrote:  The mods are on the fence about creating a history sub-forum. They have suggested that people start creating threads on history so they can gauge whether such a forum would be worthwhile. Therefore, I am resurrecting this thread in the hopes that enough people will reply and help make history sub-forum a reality.

Well, I´ll chip in then Smile

I´m interested in most kinds of history and time periods - with the exception of warfare; while I enjoy discussing what a battle, war or a weapon meant in a broader historical and cultural setting the technicalities and strategies are not that interesting to me.

My main expertise and interests rest with North European history, especially the period from around the birth of Christ to the early middleages, but I´m not shy of some ancient Greek or Roman history either.
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18-04-2013, 04:23 AM
RE: History - what interests you?
What history interests me?
Everything up to the end of the cold war.

The politics of the different periods are fascinating. It's amazing how one person, or one action can so greatly effect, in a chain of unforeseeable circumstances, the entire direction of human kind.

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18-04-2013, 04:35 AM
RE: History - what interests you?
I love history, end and beginning of story. I guess it helps when you have a fairly engaging teacher early on when you start learning history.

My passion for history currently rests in modern history, almost everywhere there. My class last term was learning about Russia's 1905 Dress Rehearsal Revolution and the February & October Revolutions of 1917. Oh Nicholas, your incompetence apparently knew no bounds...

Anybody have any suggestions for things to have a look at?

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18-04-2013, 04:41 AM
RE: History - what interests you?
(12-06-2011 03:10 PM)ghostexorcist Wrote:  I am extremely interested in history. I wanted to start this thread to see what kind of religious or secular history others on here might like to study. Just because we don't take stock in religion doesn't mean that it isn't an interesting historical phenomenon. I mainly focus on Asian and Judeo-Islamic history. I tend to meet in the middle with my fanatical study of the ancient Kaifeng Jewish community of China.

Here is a bit of info on the Jews for those who might of never heard of them. (Those interested in Christian hypocrisy might want to skip to the italicized paragraph.) Most scholars believe they arrived in China from Persia sometime before 1127 CE during the Northern Song Dynasty (960-1127). The reason they are believed to have come from Persia is because their liturgical texts were written in Judeo-Persian, an offshoot of the New Persian language using Hebrew characters. Western Jesuit missionaries visiting the community during the 18th century noted they continued to speak a few recognizable words of Persian. As for the date, the notion that they arrived during the Song Dynasty comes from the first of four stone inscriptions erected by the community in 1489, 1512, 1663 (sides A and B), and 1679. The 1489 inscription has a rather ambiguous entry which reads: “They entered to bring a tribute of western cloth to the Song." No date is mentioned, nor the name of the Emperor who was given the tribute. A lot of sources quote 960 as the exact year they arrived, but, as I mentioned, there is no date provided. I believe the authors of these works use this date because this was the year the Song Dynasty was founded. The closest scholars can get is sometime before 1127 because this was the year the foreign Jurchen armies invaded China and drove the monarchy south. They believe that the Jews would not have settled in China during a time of war.

They were most likely merchants of some kind. Researchers believe the “western cloth” they brought as tribute was cotton. Some have made the bold statement that the Jews were cotton farmers who introduced the plant to China, but this is total conjecture. Others have stated cotton had not yet been cultivated in the Song Dynasty, which is not true. There is over 2,000 years of documented cotton cultivation in China. It was hard to produce, and hard to weave, so it never gained the popularity of silk during the first millennia of its cultivation. It wasn’t until the 12th or 13th century when a new form of cotton made its way to China via India, and new weaving techniques were created. Cotton was still rare during the Northern Song, so it would have been a good tribute item. The Jews probably dealt in more items than just textiles. A Judeo-Persian letter from the later 8th century found in Xinjiang mentions a Jew selling textiles, sheep, and possibly even slaves. The Radhinite Jews from Europe sold the Chinese everything from spices to swords during the 9th century. Selling more than one item would insure the Jews made maximum profit.

During the 15th and 16th centuries, religious scholars in Europe believed the original Hebrew version of the Old Testament appearing in the Bible had purposely been defaced by Jews because of their hatred for Christianity. They claimed the Jews had to have redacted the Old Testament since it did not specifically refer to the birth, ministry, crucifixion, and ascension to heaven of Jesus Christ. And because they could not find any pre-Christian versions of the Old Testament left untouched, they believed all Jews were involved in a conspiracy to either hide or destroy all traces of the incriminating evidence. When they learned about the Kaifeng Jews, they theorized the Jews were one of the "Lost 10 Tribes of Israel" that surely had uncorrupted, pre-Christian editions of the Old Testament. So they sent Church officials to China in order to acquire one of their holy books. The westerners ultimately planned to openly compare the two in front of Europe's Jews so they would see that their doubts about Jesus as the Messiah were wrong. This would cause all the Jews worldwide to mass convert to Christianity and bring about the Second Coming of Christ. However, when they compared the two, they were exactly the same. So the Jews did not redact the Old Testament like they claimed. This did not stop them, though, from sending wave after wave of Jesuits to Kaifeng in an attempt to convert the Jews to Christianity. That didn’t work either.

The Jews prospered during the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) as government officials, merchants, and soldiers. Just like their Chinese neighbors, many of the Jews studied the Confucian classics in order to pass the government examinations and advance their family’s social status. But this meant that these enterprising young men had to give up the study of Hebrew. More and more people did this until only a select few had knowledge of the language of their forefathers. In 1800, the last Rabbi died, leaving no one with knowledge of Hebrew. Following the Christian-based Taiping Rebellion and, later, the peasant Boxer Rebellion, the community was pretty much religiously extinct. It was also during this time that the last incarnation of their synagogue finally disappeared. The Jews were so poor at this point that they literally sold the synagogue piece-by-piece in order to make money. They even sold the very dirt on which the synagogue had once stood. Growing anti-foreign sentiment at the end of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century forced the Jews to forsake the Jewish faith. Many of them became Muslims, Buddhists, Taoists, etc.

I wrote a rather lengthy two-part article on the Jews' reason for coming to China. If you are interested, you can see it here.

I also love reading about the Crusades, the history of Chinese martial arts, and Alexander the Great.

I love the history of science. Following that history lead me to the french philosophers.

That connection opened up the history of atheism. Now I've been fascinated about the lost history of those who didn't believe. Many before the 1700's where murdered, ostracized, ignored, or reasoned against. Following this history has been amazing, and saddening.

Tolerance for all religion has gone back and forth throughout the ages, but in this modern era the tolerance/social acceptance for atheism is a new movement.

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The atheist is a man who destroys the imaginary things which afflict the human race, and so leads men back to nature, to experience and to reason.
-Baron d'Holbach-
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18-04-2013, 04:43 AM
RE: History - what interests you?
(18-04-2013 04:35 AM)Free Thought Wrote:  I love history, end and beginning of story. I guess it helps when you have a fairly engaging teacher early on when you start learning history.

My passion for history currently rests in modern history, almost everywhere there. My class last term was learning about Russia's 1905 Dress Rehearsal Revolution and the February & October Revolutions of 1917. Oh Nicholas, your incompetence apparently knew no bounds...

Anybody have any suggestions for things to have a look at?

13th of August 1792 - 28th of July 1918

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18-04-2013, 10:01 AM
RE: History - what interests you?
(17-04-2013 04:39 PM)ghostexorcist Wrote:  The mods are on the fence about creating a history sub-forum. They have suggested that people start creating threads on history so they can gauge whether such a forum would be worthwhile. Therefore, I am resurrecting this thread in the hopes that enough people will reply and help make history sub-forum a reality.

I am a fan of any history, from speculation of what was happening in prehistoria through New Zealand legalising Same Sex Marriage. I have a couple of posts about the transition of Europe from the medieval period to dominance of the world in the this that and the other section that if there were a history sub section I would grab clean up and repost.

(31-07-2014 04:37 PM)Luminon Wrote:  America is full of guns, but they're useless, because nobody has the courage to shoot an IRS agent in self-defense
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18-04-2013, 01:01 PM
RE: History - what interests you?
I enjoy any historical study but not so much the study of what people did as why they did it.

The beginning of wisdom is to call things by their right names. - Chinese Proverb
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04-05-2013, 12:08 PM
RE: History - what interests you?
I'm currently working on a paper for my archaeology class on a Nazca water pot with a "spotted cat" motif. It dates to around the year 200 CE. The Nazca are known in the public eye for their geoglyphs the "Nazca Lines." However, they are known internationally and academically for their polychrome pottery. I'll post a link to the paper when I get done with it. Here is a taste. It's the spotted cat with "trophy heads" (taken during a time of war) in place of its spots. Priests would bury the heads in fields to ensure a good harvest.

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