Homeopathic Medicine
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23-09-2014, 07:05 AM (This post was last modified: 23-09-2014 07:08 AM by EvolutionKills.)
RE: Homeopathic Medicine











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23-09-2014, 07:15 AM
RE: Homeopathic Medicine
(23-09-2014 03:03 AM)Hafnof Wrote:  Homeopathy is just water and is a pure placebo, but beware that some treatments labeled as homeopathic contain active ingredients. Always check the label and if you are on any other medication inform your doctor and/or pharmacist so that drug interactions can be assessed.

This is a good point. The term "homeopathic" is increasingly being misapplied to herbal remedies that have substances other than water in them.

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Science is not a subject, but a method.
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23-09-2014, 07:44 AM
RE: Homeopathic Medicine
I doubt that homeopathy (or placebo, whatever) would have any effect on an infection.

Plus, why would you put anything into your eyes that a doctor didn't tell you too?
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23-09-2014, 01:37 PM
RE: Homeopathic Medicine
I have no significant experience with homeopathy. My parents used it sometimes, but I have never had any effects greater than placebo. Which is not good enough for me, even if it worked.
Also, I know that homeopathy has been found to have no effect by studies.

However, there is one anomalous study.
Histamine dilutions modulate basophil activation - I have no idea what that means, except it might be used against inflammation, as anti-allergy homeopathic remedy. (or pro-allergic, maybe? Consider )

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007...2-0#page-1
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23-09-2014, 01:49 PM
RE: Homeopathic Medicine
(23-09-2014 01:37 PM)Luminon Wrote:  I have no significant experience with homeopathy. My parents used it sometimes, but I have never had any effects greater than placebo. Which is not good enough for me, even if it worked.
Also, I know that homeopathy has been found to have no effect by studies.

However, there is one anomalous study.
Histamine dilutions modulate basophil activation - I have no idea what that means, except it might be used against inflammation, as anti-allergy homeopathic remedy. (or pro-allergic, maybe? Consider )

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007...2-0#page-1

None of those results were ever replicated despite repeated attempts. So, there's that. Drinking Beverage

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Science is not a subject, but a method.
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23-09-2014, 02:27 PM
RE: Homeopathic Medicine
(23-09-2014 01:49 PM)Chas Wrote:  
(23-09-2014 01:37 PM)Luminon Wrote:  I have no significant experience with homeopathy. My parents used it sometimes, but I have never had any effects greater than placebo. Which is not good enough for me, even if it worked.
Also, I know that homeopathy has been found to have no effect by studies.

However, there is one anomalous study.
Histamine dilutions modulate basophil activation - I have no idea what that means, except it might be used against inflammation, as anti-allergy homeopathic remedy. (or pro-allergic, maybe? Consider )

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007...2-0#page-1

None of those results were ever replicated despite repeated attempts. So, there's that. Drinking Beverage

The magic of statistics is that every so often false positives occur. We screen for those by doing more tests. If the positive does not recur...

Of course, there's a far more common source for such results - bad practices. This needn't even be intentional, but bad analysis of bad data from bad methods will lead to bad conclusions. Nearly all of the follow-ups to that particular article are tripe exclusively from journals of "alternative and complementary medicine". It is a favourite of desperate quote-miners and anomaly-hunters alike ("see? it's REAL! and the big bad MAN won't admit it!").
(but yeah; homeopaths affirm homeopathy in homeopathic journals? I'm shocked!)

Although there is one reasonably competent response published in the same (real, unlike most of them) journal, found here. Their findings might generously be summarised as "ambiguous at best".

That there might be some matters admitting of varying responses to high and low dosages is almost trivially true - dosage response is not linear. So there's that. But homeopathy does not mean merely "low dosages". It means literal magic on the basis of "water memory".

There's a reason homeopathy has comprehensively failed to convince competent audiences for two hundred years. Ol' Lumi might say that reason is "lol conspiracy" (or is he a True Believer in homeopathy? I can never remember which woo he espouses).
(not that he'd be alone: witness desperate homeopaths alleging a literally Orwellian "suppression of truth" here, with all the self-indulgent self-righteousness of Christians promising sinners an eternity in hell)

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