Homeopathic "Remedies" Marketing & Prescribing
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12-01-2018, 07:38 AM
RE: Homeopathic "Remedies" Marketing & Prescribing
(11-01-2018 10:05 AM)dancefortwo Wrote:  "A 2014 study led by Kaptchuk and published in Science Translational Medicine explored this by testing how people reacted to migraine pain medication. One group took a migraine drug labeled with the drug's name, another took a placebo labeled "placebo," and a third group took nothing. [b]The researchers discovered that the placebo was 50% as effective as the real drug to reduce pain after a migraine attack."[/b]

"The researchers speculated that a driving force beyond this reaction was the simple act of taking a pill. "People associate the ritual of taking medicine as a positive healing effect," says Kaptchuk. "Even if they know it's not medicine, the action itself can stimulate the brain into thinking the body is being healed."

So even knowing you're taking a sugar pill gives a positive result. I'll be honest and say that I've had acupuncture and felt fabulous afterwards. I'm sure it was the ritual, the soft music being played in the background, the attention being given to me and the cute little waterfall in the warm, inviting private room. But I felt great for a couple of weeks. It was all placebo but I'm not trying to cure cancer or some major ailment, I was just super stressed out and getting colds one after another.

I think the more likely explanation is that 50% did not know the meaning of the word 'placebo'. Dodgy

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12-01-2018, 07:41 AM
RE: Homeopathic "Remedies" Marketing & Prescribing
(12-01-2018 07:38 AM)Chas Wrote:  
(11-01-2018 10:05 AM)dancefortwo Wrote:  "A 2014 study led by Kaptchuk and published in Science Translational Medicine explored this by testing how people reacted to migraine pain medication. One group took a migraine drug labeled with the drug's name, another took a placebo labeled "placebo," and a third group took nothing. [b]The researchers discovered that the placebo was 50% as effective as the real drug to reduce pain after a migraine attack."[/b]

"The researchers speculated that a driving force beyond this reaction was the simple act of taking a pill. "People associate the ritual of taking medicine as a positive healing effect," says Kaptchuk. "Even if they know it's not medicine, the action itself can stimulate the brain into thinking the body is being healed."

So even knowing you're taking a sugar pill gives a positive result. I'll be honest and say that I've had acupuncture and felt fabulous afterwards. I'm sure it was the ritual, the soft music being played in the background, the attention being given to me and the cute little waterfall in the warm, inviting private room. But I felt great for a couple of weeks. It was all placebo but I'm not trying to cure cancer or some major ailment, I was just super stressed out and getting colds one after another.

I think the more likely explanation is that 50% did not know the meaning of the word 'placebo'. Dodgy

'S a brand name innit?

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(06-02-2014 03:47 PM)Momsurroundedbyboys Wrote:  And I'm giving myself a conclusion again from all the facepalming.
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13-01-2018, 09:21 AM
RE: Homeopathic "Remedies" Marketing & Prescribing
(12-01-2018 07:41 AM)morondog Wrote:  
(12-01-2018 07:38 AM)Chas Wrote:  I think the more likely explanation is that 50% did not know the meaning of the word 'placebo'.

'S a brand name innit?

Nah silly... he's a Spanish opera singer. Full name...

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13-01-2018, 10:10 AM
RE: Homeopathic "Remedies" Marketing & Prescribing
My SIL, a truly delightful lovely lady is caught in the web of this woo Weeping
She has some allergies, and got the homeopathic version of allergy testing and 'treatment'.
I visit and open the fridge, and it just makes me sad.
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18-01-2018, 04:24 PM (This post was last modified: 18-01-2018 04:28 PM by Dr H.)
RE: Homeopathic "Remedies" Marketing & Prescribing
(10-01-2018 08:39 PM)SYZ Wrote:  The US Center for Inquiry has filed a complaint against CVS Health with the DC Department of Consumer and Regulatory Affairs in order to keep CVS from marketing homeopathic products as though they are scientifically proven treatments, or displaying them alongside real, evidence-based medicine.

CVS Must Stop Marketing Homeopathic Pseudoscience as Real Medicine in D.C.

"CVS Health is deliberately creating the false impression that homeopathic products are as safe and effective as scientifically-proven medicine,” said Nicholas Little, CFI’s Vice President and General Counsel. "By obscuring the crucial distinction between genuine and sham treatments, CVS is unscrupulously abusing the trust of its customers while putting their health and even their lives at risk".

But the this message—I think—is seriously diluted [sic ] by their later proposal:

"Rather than asking that CVS no longer be allowed to sell homeopathic products, CFI [merely] suggests a series of changes, such as no longer displaying homeopathics on the same shelves as evidence-based medicines and creating a new homeopathy section of their physical and online stores with clear warnings there is no evidence that the products contained therein are effective for the treatment of any ailment or condition".

• Why does the FDA not simply place a total ban on the production and sale of all so-called homeopathic medicines?

It's because there's a strong lobby in favor of homeopathy here.

The 1938 Food, Drug, and Cosmetics Act recognized homeopathic preparations as "drugs", thanks largely to the efforts of Royal Copeland, a senator from NY, who also happened to be a homeopathic "physician". They are essentially still regulated under this act, which contains especially lenient standards for homeopathic preps.

Having grown into a ~$4 billion annual industry in the US, subsequent attempts to amend this act to more stringently regulate homeopathic preps have repeatedly been derailed.

CSI knows all this, and is probably shooting for something they think they can actually achieve, rather than getting bogged down in an endless legislative battle that goes nowhere. Sometimes you have to start with small steps.

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19-01-2018, 04:32 PM
RE: Homeopathic "Remedies" Marketing & Prescribing
Folks,

I went to a homeopathic practitioner. She listened to me, took notes, asked intelligent questions about my situation. The consultation lasted for an hour.

When I went back she gave me some medicine based on her diagnosis. It didn't work.

D.
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19-01-2018, 05:05 PM
RE: Homeopathic "Remedies" Marketing & Prescribing
(19-01-2018 04:32 PM)Dworkin Wrote:  Folks,

I went to a homeopathic practitioner. She listened to me, took notes, asked intelligent questions about my situation. The consultation lasted for an hour.

When I went back she gave me some medicine based on her diagnosis. It didn't work.

Try a brand name instead of the generic stuff...
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19-01-2018, 07:05 PM
RE: Homeopathic "Remedies" Marketing & Prescribing
(19-01-2018 05:05 PM)unfogged Wrote:  
(19-01-2018 04:32 PM)Dworkin Wrote:  Folks,

I went to a homeopathic practitioner. She listened to me, took notes, asked intelligent questions about my situation. The consultation lasted for an hour.

When I went back she gave me some medicine based on her diagnosis. It didn't work.

Try a brand name instead of the generic stuff...
[Image: images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSdVvmd4jdKX1jLJz6PYwH...kd9b9vcosQ]

Careful with that stuff; it's pretty strong.

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19-01-2018, 10:06 PM
RE: Homeopathic "Remedies" Marketing & Prescribing
I would like to see all the crap that isn't evidence based removed from pharmacies - but that's not going to happen because they make huge profit from them. Multivitamins are one of the worst products in the pharmacy doing more harm than good, and most of them (probably all of them in an average pharmacy) are not actually formulated correctly for those who actually need them (alcoholics for example).

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20-01-2018, 03:25 AM
RE: Homeopathic "Remedies" Marketing & Prescribing
(19-01-2018 04:32 PM)Dworkin Wrote:  Folks,

I went to a homeopathic practitioner. She listened to me, took notes, asked intelligent questions about my situation. The consultation lasted for an hour.

When I went back she gave me some medicine based on her diagnosis. It didn't work.

D.

Some of the efficacy of homeopathy may be attributable to exactly that from what I've read. Normal medical doctors are rushed off their feet and aren't gonna give any random person who walks in an hour of their time. Yet some of healthcare is also emotional and a person who listens, even if they're selling some woo about auras, and if they have the trappings of medicine (the magic stethoscope and white coat), then... yeah. When the patient recovers through whatever means, they may well attribute it to the kind homeopathic doctor.

The people I don't get are those who are MDs who also practice homeopathy? Are they just cashing in?

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(06-02-2014 03:47 PM)Momsurroundedbyboys Wrote:  And I'm giving myself a conclusion again from all the facepalming.
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