Homeopathic "Remedies" Marketing & Prescribing
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20-01-2018, 04:04 AM
RE: Homeopathic "Remedies" Marketing & Prescribing
(20-01-2018 03:25 AM)morondog Wrote:  The people I don't get are those who are MDs who also practice homeopathy? Are they just cashing in?

That's possible. Or they are clowns unfit to be MD in the first place. Or they are good at compartmentalizing. Or they just don't give a damn about patients.

The first revolt is against the supreme tyranny of theology, of the phantom of God. As long as we have a master in heaven, we will be slaves on earth.

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20-01-2018, 05:49 AM
RE: Homeopathic "Remedies" Marketing & Prescribing
(19-01-2018 10:06 PM)Aractus Wrote:  I would like to see all the crap that isn't evidence based removed from pharmacies - but that's not going to happen because they make huge profit from them...

Depressingly true. Here in Australia, it's estimated that chemist shops (pharmacies) make upwards of 80% of their profits by flogging non-prescription drugs. There are of course some legitimate OTC drugs such as vitamin D, zinc, iron or magnesium supplements, or St Johns Wort.

When I was a kid, we had "dispensaries" which were a type of pharmacy usually owned and operated by one of the so-called "friendly societies" (such as Manchester Unity Independent Order of Oddfellows, Hibernian Australian Catholic Benefit Society, Grand United Order of Oddfellows, United Ancient Order of Druids etc).

Notably, they had arrangements with local doctors to fill prescriptions, after the doctors ceased doing this themselves during an earlier period in Australia. Also notably, they didn't sell any non-prescription items, and the drugs were super cheap—compared to the overpriced, corporate-led pricing of essential drugs today. No toilet paper; no peanut butter; no perfumes; no lollies; no dish-washing detergent etc.

I'm a creationist... I believe that man created God.
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25-01-2018, 04:42 PM
RE: Homeopathic "Remedies" Marketing & Prescribing
(19-01-2018 10:06 PM)Aractus Wrote:  I would like to see all the crap that isn't evidence based removed from pharmacies - but that's not going to happen because they make huge profit from them. Multivitamins are one of the worst products in the pharmacy doing more harm than good, and most of them (probably all of them in an average pharmacy) are not actually formulated correctly for those who actually need them (alcoholics for example).

Hell, pharmacies around here still sell copper bracelets.

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08-02-2018, 12:52 PM
RE: Homeopathic "Remedies" Marketing & Prescribing
(25-01-2018 04:42 PM)Dr H Wrote:  Hell, pharmacies around here still sell copper bracelets.

And magnetic pillows and mattress toppers, knee and ankle braces, innersoles, bracelets and pendants etc.
I recently asked a pharmacist in the big smoke why he had a display of magnetic stuff on his sales counter, and whether he was convinced they actually worked as described. His answer? "Their sales rep told me they did". Fucking seriously mate?!

I read on one woo site that by wearing copper bracelets, your body was absorbing copper through your skin (transdermal micronutrition) in small but necessary doses. And that copper emits "anti-inflammatory and antioxidant" energy to ease stiff joints, arthritis and rheumatism.
And—miraculously—wearing a copper bracelet on your wrist can still ease joint pain in the knees. Who woulda thunk it?

I do know of course that for humans, copper is essential to the proper functioning of our metabolic processes, and is absorbed in the stomach and the small intestine. Adequate daily copper uptake is around 30 μg/kg of body weight, but you sure ain't gonna get that through the skin of your wrist LOL.

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08-02-2018, 01:19 PM
RE: Homeopathic "Remedies" Marketing & Prescribing
(08-02-2018 12:52 PM)SYZ Wrote:  And—miraculously—wearing a copper bracelet on your wrist can still ease joint pain in the knees. Who woulda thunk it?

Or a "magnetic healing" bracelet. Someone I worked with wore one and swore that it made him healthier. I commented that he should really go in for a full-body MRI, and then he would be immortal. He didn't answer, but he also didn't wear the bracelet to work any more.
Big Grin

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08-02-2018, 01:44 PM
RE: Homeopathic "Remedies" Marketing & Prescribing
(12-01-2018 07:38 AM)Chas Wrote:  
(11-01-2018 10:05 AM)dancefortwo Wrote:  "A 2014 study led by Kaptchuk and published in Science Translational Medicine explored this by testing how people reacted to migraine pain medication. One group took a migraine drug labeled with the drug's name, another took a placebo labeled "placebo," and a third group took nothing. [b]The researchers discovered that the placebo was 50% as effective as the real drug to reduce pain after a migraine attack."[/b]

"The researchers speculated that a driving force beyond this reaction was the simple act of taking a pill. "People associate the ritual of taking medicine as a positive healing effect," says Kaptchuk. "Even if they know it's not medicine, the action itself can stimulate the brain into thinking the body is being healed."

So even knowing you're taking a sugar pill gives a positive result. I'll be honest and say that I've had acupuncture and felt fabulous afterwards. I'm sure it was the ritual, the soft music being played in the background, the attention being given to me and the cute little waterfall in the warm, inviting private room. But I felt great for a couple of weeks. It was all placebo but I'm not trying to cure cancer or some major ailment, I was just super stressed out and getting colds one after another.

I think the more likely explanation is that 50% did not know the meaning of the word 'placebo'. Dodgy

The participants knew what the word "placebo" meant but people can fool themselves even when they know they're fooling themselves.

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He is deformed, crooked, old, and sere,
Ill-fac’d, worse bodied, shapeless every where;
Vicious, ungentle, foolish, blunt, unkind,
Stigmatical in making, worse in mind.
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