Household Chemistry
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10-11-2012, 08:47 PM
RE: Household Chemistry
No weed jokes from Stark yet? Aw.

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10-11-2012, 08:57 PM
RE: Household Chemistry
(10-11-2012 08:38 PM)robotworld Wrote:  
(10-11-2012 08:14 PM)Phaedrus Wrote:  I tried it with hot water too; that speeds it up somewhat, but not nearly as much as the alcohol. I discovered the acetic acid + isopropyl reaction originally using both chemicals at room temperature. The hot water just makes it go even faster. I believe the isopropyl has molecular interactions with the CaCO3 that lift it off the surface of the glass and into weak solution. Normally the CaCO3 would immediately deposit again, but in this case the acetic acid is available to react with it and create calcium acetate.

Isopropyl alcohol is an effective solvent, but not because of its extremely mild acidity; it is a good solvent because it interacts with all sorts of organic molecules through various forces like Van der Waals and hydrogen bonds, etc. I think it's acting on the carbonate group, in this case.



Isopropyl and acetic acid will not esterify without sulfuric acid to catalyze the reaction.
I agree with what you said regarding how alcohol is able to first "lift" the CaCO3 sediments off the glass (probably because the interactions between alcohol are more favourable than the interactions between glass), thus increasing the surface area available for reaction. This is when ethanoic acid comes in, reacting with CaCO3, but at a higher rate due to increase surface area for reaction. Am I right to say that? Smile
Exactly.




And yes Erx, you can build a bomb. You'll have to figure it out on your own though. Rolleyes

E 2 = (mc 2)2 + (pc )2
614C → 714N + e + ̅νe
2 K(s) + 2 H2O(l) → 2 KOH(aq) + H2 (g) + 196 kJ/mol
It works, bitches.
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10-11-2012, 09:10 PM
RE: Household Chemistry
Isn't boiled gasoline a key component in some kind of homemade napalm?

Also, I heard once that diesel with chips of soap mixed in can make a very potent napalm-like long-burn gel...

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10-11-2012, 09:15 PM
RE: Household Chemistry
So no mixing bleach with gas and soap... got it Big Grin

what about the untraceable poison? I have... pests, yeah pests, I need to... uhmm.. neutralize Dodgy

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10-11-2012, 09:17 PM
RE: Household Chemistry
Electroplating!


Electroplating is normally a complicated industrial process, used to layer one metal over another. However, there are a couple of metals that are easy to electroplate. We're going to electroplate copper onto an aluminum key. Let me show you how.


Materials:

Pyrex or ceramic dish (clean)
Key or similar metal object (aluminum, iron, zinc, or nickel are fine)
Copper (pre-1974 US pennies work well)
Distilled white vinegar
Distilled water
Table salt
9V battery
Wire
Wire stripper
Soap

Latex or Nitrile gloves (OPTIONAL)
Soldering gun and solder (OPTIONAL)


First take your key (or whatever; call it a key) and thoroughly clean it using soap and hot water. Be very thorough, clean every part of it and scrub as hard as you can. Any oils or dirt on the surface of the key will cause the copper layer to be weaker and possibly wear or flake off. Dry it with paper towels. From this point forward handle the key with gloves, to stop oils from your skin from contaminating it. This isn't required, but does help ensure a more durable coating.

Next take your penny and attach a 6-12" length of wire to it. You can just wrap the bare end of the wire several times around the penny; however a more secure connection can be made using solder. Either way will work. Attach the other end of the wire to the + terminal of the battery.

Now take your key and do the same thing with another 6-12" length of wire, only this time attach the other end to the - terminal of the battery.

Now take your dish and fill it with one (1) part vinegar and one (1) part distilled water. Now slowly add salt while stirring until it stops dissolving.

Now it's time to start electroplating! Take your key and coin (both attached to the battery) and put them both into the dish so the liquid covers them completely. You should immediately see bubbles start forming on the coin and and brownish copper start appearing on the surface of the key. The copper will naturally accumulate more on the sharp points and edges of the key, and on the part of it closer to the coin. Move the coin around (hold it by the wire) and hold it close to different parts of the key to ensure even coating. This should take 5 to 10 minutes.

Remove the key from the bath and lay it on a paper towel to dry for 30 minutes. Pick it up and rub it vigorously with your finger. If done correctly there should be no effect; if copper rubs off onto your hand then something went wrong (the key wasn't clean enough, or maybe you used non-distilled water).

Repeat the process another one or two times with a fresh water+vinegar+salt solution and possibly a second penny. I don't recommend more than two coats total for a key, or it may stop fitting its lock. For other objects you can apply as many layers as you like.

First coat:
[Image: electroplated_key_by_phaedrus2401-d37cmu2.jpg]


After the second coat: (before polishing)
[Image: electroplated_key___finished_by_phaedrus...37cqny.jpg]



How this works: The vinegar dissolves the copper into solution, so you have loose copper atoms floating around. The battery supplies an electric current through the solution; the positive charge going to the copper cause electrons to be stolen from the copper, ionizing it. That ionized copper now wants electrons to stabilize itself; the atoms are drawn toward the key, which has a negative charge, that is supplying electrons. The copper atoms stick to the surface of the key, where they gain an electron and stick. This forms a layer of copper on top of the base metal.


For an idea of how durable this layer of metal can be, here's the key from above, after two years of use and being carried around and dropped and rubbed against other keys and so on:

[Image: untitled_by_phaedrus2401-d5kpvv6.jpg]


Dirty, a bit oxidized, but still intact.



Science!

E 2 = (mc 2)2 + (pc )2
614C → 714N + e + ̅νe
2 K(s) + 2 H2O(l) → 2 KOH(aq) + H2 (g) + 196 kJ/mol
It works, bitches.
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15-11-2012, 12:20 PM
RE: Household Chemistry
I've done that before with a setup I initially designed for creating sodium chlorate through electrolysis (for smoke bombs).

If something can be destroyed by the truth, it might be worth destroying.

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15-11-2012, 01:46 PM
RE: Household Chemistry
Place raw sodium in dihydrogen monoxide

Big Grin

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15-11-2012, 02:46 PM
RE: Household Chemistry
Oh! I have one for cleaning silverware (or a good way to find out if it's real!).

Take a deep large bowl, anything but metal (enough to submerge your silverware in).

Line the inside with aluminum foil.

Sprinkle copious amounts of baking soda on the foil.

Boil a large amount of water (enough to fill bowl and submerge silverware).

*act quickly*

Pour hot water into bowl, as the reaction happens submerge your silverware for 30 seconds up to a couple minutes (depending on how much previous oxidization your silverware has had).

Instantly shiny silverware! It gets in to details and grooves, too. No more hand polishing and scrubbing! Super fun. Kinda smelly (Mmm, ozone air!).
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15-11-2012, 02:59 PM
RE: Household Chemistry
(15-11-2012 02:46 PM)LadyJane Wrote:  Oh! I have one for cleaning silverware (or a good way to find out if it's real!).

Take a deep large bowl, anything but metal (enough to submerge your silverware in).

Line the inside with aluminum foil.

Sprinkle copious amounts of baking soda on the foil.

Boil a large amount of water (enough to fill bowl and submerge silverware).

*act quickly*

Pour hot water into bowl, as the reaction happens submerge your silverware for 30 seconds up to a couple minutes (depending on how much previous oxidization your silverware has had).

Instantly shiny silverware! It gets in to details and grooves, too. No more hand polishing and scrubbing! Super fun. Kinda smelly (Mmm, ozone air!).
I would miss the hand polishing if I started using this method.

It was just a fucking apple man, we're sorry okay? Please stop the madness Laugh out load
~Izel
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15-11-2012, 09:19 PM
RE: Household Chemistry
(15-11-2012 01:46 PM)kingschosen Wrote:  Place raw sodium in dihydrogen monoxide

Big Grin
Caesium is far more impressive - toss a lump or vial into a bowl of water and the bowl will explode. It's awesome stuff, but damned expensive to fool around with.

If something can be destroyed by the truth, it might be worth destroying.

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