Household Chemistry
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16-11-2012, 07:26 AM
RE: Household Chemistry
Cesium's a leetle bit expensive too. Tongue Plus there are fewer atoms per gram so you actually need more of it to get the explosive power of Sodium and Potassium. The best bang per gram and bang per dollar is with Potassium.

E 2 = (mc 2)2 + (pc )2
614C → 714N + e + ̅νe
2 K(s) + 2 H2O(l) → 2 KOH(aq) + H2 (g) + 196 kJ/mol
It works, bitches.
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16-11-2012, 09:33 AM
RE: Household Chemistry
all along i thought baking soda and vinegar gave ya best bang per buck... Weeping

WAIT .. I know.. put some dry ice into a plastic bottle .. add some water.. seal with the cap and just wait....... BOOM!

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16-11-2012, 09:38 AM
RE: Household Chemistry
(16-11-2012 09:33 AM)ddrew Wrote:  all along i thought baking soda and vinegar gave ya best bang per buck... Weeping

WAIT .. I know.. put some dry ice into a plastic bottle .. add some water.. seal with the cap and just wait....... BOOM!


Big Grin Not as fun as doing it with liquid nitrogen! Ah, I miss the lab in Taipei... Liquid nitrogen and $40k machines and a whole lotta energy drink. Fun times. Tongue

E 2 = (mc 2)2 + (pc )2
614C → 714N + e + ̅νe
2 K(s) + 2 H2O(l) → 2 KOH(aq) + H2 (g) + 196 kJ/mol
It works, bitches.
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17-11-2012, 07:30 AM
RE: Household Chemistry
Any Ideas on how to remove stubborn stains from clothing without wrecking the clothing???

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17-11-2012, 07:36 AM
Household Chemistry
Club soda?

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17-11-2012, 10:16 AM
RE: Household Chemistry
(17-11-2012 07:30 AM)bemore Wrote:  Any Ideas on how to remove stubborn stains from clothing without wrecking the clothing???
OxiClean

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21-04-2013, 12:23 PM
RE: Household Chemistry
(10-11-2012 08:09 PM)robotworld Wrote:  
(10-11-2012 07:33 PM)Phaedrus Wrote:  I'd just like to post some simple chemistry reactions that are neat or useful that can be performed safely with common household chemicals.


The first one is useful for when you have dishes with nasty lime deposits. Lime is calcium carbonate, CaCO3, and is naturally found dissolved in water. When water containing calcium carbonate evaporates, the CaCO3 is left behind as faint white spots on your dishes, especially visible on glassware.

CaCO3 can be a pain in the butt to get off of your dishes. Normal soap does not attack it, or does so only weakly. It's time for some chemistry.

CaCO3 will react with acetic acid (aka vinegar) to create calcium acetate and carbon dioxide. The calcium acetate dissolves off the glass and into the water, so it can be poured down the drain, leaving your glassware clean. Great! But there's a problem: this process is very slow, taking at least a couple hours to completely remove the lime stains.

That's where our second reagent comes in: isopropyl alcohol, or "rubbing alcohol". Isopropyl is only a very weak acid, and interacts mainly through Van der Waals forces (the forces that allow chameleons to cling to walls and ceilings). It won't do anything to CaCO3 on its own. But mix it with acetic acid, and it will work as a catalyst to speed the reaction up enormously.


So simply take your glass, fill it with one (1) part distilled white vinegar, one (1) part 70% or 91% rubbing alcohol, and two (2) parts hot water. You'll immediately see bubbles form and rise to the top of the glass; this is the carbon dioxide released as the calcium in CaCO3 bonds with the acetic acid. Within 5 to 15 minutes your glass should be spot-free.

This mixture is also a good general purpose glass and tile cleaner, when you need something with a bit more "oomph" than Windex.



WARNING: Isopropyl alcohol is toxic to ingest, and does release fumes. Use in a ventilated area. If you start to get a headache, go outside immediately to clear your head.
Just something that has been bugging me while reading your post. How does alcohol act as a catalyst in this reaction? I was thinking that the fact that you used hot water could have sped up the reaction many times due to kinetic reasons. The only reaction between acids and alcohols I can think of offhand is esterification, where the acid and alcohol molecules join together under certain conditions to form an ester.


I know this is an old post, but you're right. The thing posted above is the process for making flammable gel, but the reaction is very quick and complete, so it would be great for getting lime off of dishes. I don't believe it's a catalytic reaction because there is no excess alcohol + product in the formula for making the gel, but I don't know the empirical formula for the full product, so that is just my guess.
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22-04-2013, 09:20 AM
RE: Household Chemistry
I was wondering what happens if I put some bleach into the refrigerator to make some ice cubes.

Then, the same with vinegar (or acid taken from my car's battery).

After both bleach and vinegar are in the form of ice cubes, mix them together in a paper box and leave it where the plagues are. When the ice melts I guess it will produce very nasty fumes and gases that will kill rats and other plagues.

Will it work? Consider I should try that some day...

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27-10-2013, 03:52 PM
RE: Household Chemistry
Hello, I really wasn't thinking about it and mixed a small amount of rubbing alcohol into a bucket of warm water. I then pour bleach straight on my floor and washed the floors with it and used the warm water combo as a rinse for the mop. (the floors were just looking really nasty and I wanted to get them super clean)
I've seen a couple things that said this is a bad combo, can any go into more details with how bad a mistake I've made with this? Thanks
Dawn
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27-10-2013, 08:38 PM
RE: Household Chemistry
Small correction: the reason why oxygen in the air is relatively unreactive is because it is in a triplet state (a biradical) whereas other molecules are in a singlet state (no unpaired electrons). If so happened that oxygen would naturally occur iin a singlet state, we wouldn't be here to discuss this because we would be burning Smile

Fun "paradox": The higher the selection pressure, the slower evolution takes place.
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