How OLD can a human brain get before noticeable failure?
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03-08-2013, 10:32 PM
How OLD can a human brain get before noticeable failure?
Ears, eyes, arms, lungs, heart, kidney, bones, etc are all replaceable. The only human organ that won't be replaceable is the brain and the various stems and lobes associated with it.

My question is, how old can a human brain get before it starts to noticeably fail? Meaning, even though you're 100 with essentially an 20yr olds body, what about your brain?

Would a younger healthier body rejuvenate the brain? Better oxygen circulation, better nutrients extracted from healthier organs, etc?
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03-08-2013, 10:37 PM
RE: How OLD can a human brain get before noticeable failure?
(03-08-2013 10:32 PM)PoolBoyG Wrote:  Ears, eyes, arms, lungs, heart, kidney, bones, etc are all replaceable. The only human organ that won't be replaceable is the brain and the various stems and lobes associated with it.

My question is, how old can a human brain get before it starts to noticeably fail? Meaning, even though you're 100 with essentially an 20yr olds body, what about your brain?

Would a younger healthier body rejuvenate the brain? Better oxygen circulation, better nutrients extracted from healthier organs, etc?

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/201...164716.htm

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03-08-2013, 11:15 PM
RE: How OLD can a human brain get before noticeable failure?
My grandmother was in her 80s when she died in 2010. Her body had been giving out and giving up for a few years before the end when things accelerated in deterioration. I had a long phone conversation with her less than three months before her death...she may have been frail and had been housebound for quite some time but her memory was still amazingly sharp as was her wit. I was shocked that she declined so quickly after that.

I think it was in large part because she exercised her brain throughout her life. She read an astounding number of books and could tell you the weather conditions and recount every storm to hit Cape Hatteras almost from the time of her birth.

On the other hand, my husband's grandmother was physically strong as an ox. A physically healthy woman whose mind was already slipping when I met her over twenty years ago. Because family members didn't notice till much later (they had grown used to her mental lapses) I was accused of seeing something that didn't exist. Before she completely declined in physical health, she had the mind of a small child for a few years. She and my grandmother were about the same age and passed away with a year of so of one another.

It was strange to see the differences in the two, both in their physical health and their mental clarity.

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05-08-2013, 01:07 AM (This post was last modified: 05-08-2013 01:12 AM by DeepThought.)
RE: How OLD can a human brain get before noticeable failure?
How do you know they arent replacable? Young brains show remarkable plasticity. There are cases where almost half the brain was cut away and they function normally with average or near average iq.

Its a matter of tapping into that potential. Finding out the gene expession signature in those younger cells.

Parts of our brain continuously self renew. There are a few progenitor stem cell lines in the brain. One of them is responsible for your sense of smell, renewing the nerve cells in the lining of your nose. Smelling things clogs cell receptors so they need constant replacement to keep your sense of smell.

There are other parts of the brain that can partially repair damage even in adults.

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05-08-2013, 01:55 AM
RE: How OLD can a human brain get before noticeable failure?
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05-08-2013, 05:24 AM
RE: How OLD can a human brain get before noticeable failure?
(05-08-2013 01:07 AM)DeepThought Wrote:  How do you know they arent replacable? Young brains show remarkable plasticity. There are cases where almost half the brain was cut away and they function normally with average or near average iq.

Its a matter of tapping into that potential. Finding out the gene expession signature in those younger cells.

Parts of our brain continuously self renew. There are a few progenitor stem cell lines in the brain. One of them is responsible for your sense of smell, renewing the nerve cells in the lining of your nose. Smelling things clogs cell receptors so they need constant replacement to keep your sense of smell.

There are other parts of the brain that can partially repair damage even in adults.

Well, the sense of smell does deteriorate with age though, as well as the sense of taste and your eyesight and hearing do too.

My gramps lived to be 98 and stayed sharp til the day he died. Grammy did regress starting at 85, but she got along fine until she died at 95.

Replacing parts of the brain - sounds scary, I doubt we know for sure whether we will be messing with personality or not.

BTW, it's mostly young to middle aged people who want to find the elixir of youth, the older ones tend to be ok with being old and facing death. Generalizing here, of course.

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05-08-2013, 05:46 AM
RE: How OLD can a human brain get before noticeable failure?
(05-08-2013 05:24 AM)Dom Wrote:  
(05-08-2013 01:07 AM)DeepThought Wrote:  How do you know they arent replacable? Young brains show remarkable plasticity. There are cases where almost half the brain was cut away and they function normally with average or near average iq.

Its a matter of tapping into that potential. Finding out the gene expession signature in those younger cells.

Parts of our brain continuously self renew. There are a few progenitor stem cell lines in the brain. One of them is responsible for your sense of smell, renewing the nerve cells in the lining of your nose. Smelling things clogs cell receptors so they need constant replacement to keep your sense of smell.

There are other parts of the brain that can partially repair damage even in adults.

Well, the sense of smell does deteriorate with age though, as well as the sense of taste and your eyesight and hearing do too.

My gramps lived to be 98 and stayed sharp til the day he died. Grammy did regress starting at 85, but she got along fine until she died at 95.

Replacing parts of the brain - sounds scary, I doubt we know for sure whether we will be messing with personality or not.

BTW, it's mostly young to middle aged people who want to find the elixir of youth, the older ones tend to be ok with being old and facing death. Generalizing here, of course.

Allot of people seem to have funny ideas about life extension technologies. Most people I talk to think that it involves rotting in an old decrepit body prolonging the inevitable while falling apart in a Frankenstein monster fashion.

It's understandable then why they have this silly attitude. Life span extension is met with allot of skepticism and cynicism, which is understandable. It's looking like it's getting pretty close now though. We are unraveling biological puzzles that we wouldn't have dreamed of solving 10 years ago.

With stem cells there are now blind people who can see again. Based on that alone I would say Jesus has returned! Praise Jebus! Angel

When I talk about life extension I'm thinking health extension. Having a healthy pain free comfortable body to live in.

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05-08-2013, 08:37 AM
RE: How OLD can a human brain get before noticeable failure?
I'll let you know when all my body parts have eventually been replaced with robotic counter parts and all that remains is my brain and I'm 2000 years old and still going strong.

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05-08-2013, 01:17 PM
RE: How OLD can a human brain get before noticeable failure?
In these days and thanks to Facebook, no more than 17 yrs.

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05-08-2013, 08:33 PM
RE: How OLD can a human brain get before noticeable failure?
(03-08-2013 10:37 PM)Bucky Ball Wrote:  
(03-08-2013 10:32 PM)PoolBoyG Wrote:  Ears, eyes, arms, lungs, heart, kidney, bones, etc are all replaceable. The only human organ that won't be replaceable is the brain and the various stems and lobes associated with it.

My question is, how old can a human brain get before it starts to noticeably fail? Meaning, even though you're 100 with essentially an 20yr olds body, what about your brain?

Would a younger healthier body rejuvenate the brain? Better oxygen circulation, better nutrients extracted from healthier organs, etc?

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/201...164716.htm

The link was half relevant. The link is to an article that talks about the proposed ability to 1. renew brain cells. and 2. to continually renew brain cells. But the main question remain. As a segway...

The scenario brought up of replacing parts of the brain at a time is interesting. Renewing or replacing cells gradually and not affecting the personality of the person.
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