Poll: How did life arise in the universe?
Via some natural process
Via the product of intellect
Life has always existed.
We don't know
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How did life arise in the universe?
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26-10-2014, 05:55 PM
RE: How did life arise in the universe?
(26-10-2014 05:47 PM)CiderThinker Wrote:  Can I answer both 1 and 4 to this?

I did.


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26-10-2014, 05:56 PM
RE: How did life arise in the universe?
There needs to be a 5th poll option.

Jebus done did it. Thumbsup Yes Thumbsup

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26-10-2014, 06:07 PM (This post was last modified: 26-10-2014 06:13 PM by Rahn127.)
RE: How did life arise in the universe?
(26-10-2014 01:29 PM)Rik Wrote:  
(26-10-2014 09:35 AM)Rahn127 Wrote:  Let's start with the most honest answer I personally can give. "I don't know"

I know experiments have been done that show how inorganic molecules placed in a similar atmospheric environment that the earth had a billion years ago or more can cause protein chains, some of the building blocks of life, to form. So it has been shown that organic molecules can arise from inorganic molecules under certain conditions.

Given more time and more experiments, I think we will gain more knowledge about abiogenesis

You don't mean 'inorganic molecules' because those are molecules not containing carbon. You'll never get organic molecules from inorganic ones. You need carbon.

And the correct answer is E) I don't know, but abiogenesis seems the likeliest answer.

Yes, I do mean inorganic. Inorganic compounds can contain carbon. CO2 is an example.

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26-10-2014, 06:22 PM
RE: How did life arise in the universe?
(26-10-2014 05:56 PM)Bucky Ball Wrote:  There needs to be a 5th poll option.

Jebus done did it. Thumbsup Yes Thumbsup

No, it needs to be

Jesus did done do'ed it!


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26-10-2014, 06:35 PM (This post was last modified: 27-10-2014 05:31 AM by Chas.)
RE: How did life arise in the universe?
(26-10-2014 06:07 PM)Rahn127 Wrote:  
(26-10-2014 01:29 PM)Rik Wrote:  You don't mean 'inorganic molecules' because those are molecules not containing carbon. You'll never get organic molecules from inorganic ones. You need carbon.

And the correct answer is E) I don't know, but abiogenesis seems the likeliest answer.

Yes, I do mean inorganic. Inorganic compounds can contain carbon. CO2 is an example.

Depends who you ask. Chemists class any carbon-containing molecule organic. If it contains carbon, it is an organic compound by definition.
"Organic chemistry is a chemistry subdiscipline involving the scientific study of the structure, properties, and reactions of organic compounds and organic materials,
i.e., matter in its various forms that contain carbon atoms"

However, biologists don't always agree as CO₂ is also produced non-biologically.

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Science is not a subject, but a method.
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26-10-2014, 06:50 PM
RE: How did life arise in the universe?
(26-10-2014 06:35 PM)Chas Wrote:  
(26-10-2014 06:07 PM)Rahn127 Wrote:  Yes, I do mean inorganic. Inorganic compounds can contain carbon. CO2 is an example.

Nope.
"Organic chemistry is a chemistry subdiscipline involving the scientific study of the structure, properties, and reactions of organic compounds and organic materials,
i.e., matter in its various forms that contain carbon atoms"

If it contains carbon, it is an organic compound by definition.

Organic compounds do contain carbon, but some inorganic compounds also contain carbon. I can see why there is some confusion.

The primary difference between organic compounds and inorganic compounds is that organic compounds always contain carbon while most inorganic compounds do not contain carbon. Also, almost all organic compounds contain carbon-hydrogen or C-H bonds.

Until the last half of the 19th century, it was believed that organic compounds could only be produced by living things. Cyanides, bicarbonates, carbonates, and some other carbon-containing compounds were classified as "inorganic" because of their source: they can be obtained in large quantity from minerals.

Organic compounds can be produced from inorganic raw materials. But the traditional division of compounds into organic and inorganic is useful, and it continues to be used.
A sharper (but equally artificial) line can be drawn between the organic and inorganic realms by considering organic compounds as more than simply carbon-containing compounds. Compounds that are considered organic must contain carbon bound to hydrogen and possibly other elements. By this definition, iron cyanide complexes, carbon dioxide, carbon tetrachloride, and sodium bicarbonate are all inorganic.

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26-10-2014, 06:52 PM
RE: How did life arise in the universe?
(26-10-2014 06:50 PM)Rahn127 Wrote:  
(26-10-2014 06:35 PM)Chas Wrote:  Nope.
"Organic chemistry is a chemistry subdiscipline involving the scientific study of the structure, properties, and reactions of organic compounds and organic materials,
i.e., matter in its various forms that contain carbon atoms"

If it contains carbon, it is an organic compound by definition.

Organic compounds do contain carbon, but some inorganic compounds also contain carbon. I can see why there is some confusion.

The primary difference between organic compounds and inorganic compounds is that organic compounds always contain carbon while most inorganic compounds do not contain carbon. Also, almost all organic compounds contain carbon-hydrogen or C-H bonds.

Until the last half of the 19th century, it was believed that organic compounds could only be produced by living things. Cyanides, bicarbonates, carbonates, and some other carbon-containing compounds were classified as "inorganic" because of their source: they can be obtained in large quantity from minerals.

Organic compounds can be produced from inorganic raw materials. But the traditional division of compounds into organic and inorganic is useful, and it continues to be used.
A sharper (but equally artificial) line can be drawn between the organic and inorganic realms by considering organic compounds as more than simply carbon-containing compounds. Compounds that are considered organic must contain carbon bound to hydrogen and possibly other elements. By this definition, iron cyanide complexes, carbon dioxide, carbon tetrachloride, and sodium bicarbonate are all inorganic.

I edited my answer while you were responding. Big Grin

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26-10-2014, 08:26 PM
RE: How did life arise in the universe?
Well, even if scientists can prove abiogenesis to be the beginnings of life believers won't accept it for the same reason they don't accept evolution. They'll find something wrong with it somewhere , most likely evil scientists conspired to eliminate god from the universe so they won't listen to anything scientists say.

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27-10-2014, 02:26 AM
RE: How did life arise in the universe?
(26-10-2014 05:47 PM)CiderThinker Wrote:  Can I answer both 1 and 4 to this?
Yes, It must have been a natural process because, well, what is an unnatural process?

And, we don't know yet how life arose naturally.

The question is a bit bizzare.
It kind of assumes life arose only once in our universe and perhaps spread from there.

What is more likely is that life has arose many, many times in different ways.
But of course it's all conjecture, all we know is that all life on Earth has the same DNA language, and shares many proteins etc, so it seems on Earth that we are all related.

But of course the definition of life is not well defined. Replicating structures arose, got better and better at replicating because those ones became more prolific and could win in the competition for limited resources. And at some stage we defined some of the better replicators as belonging to a group we call "life".
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27-10-2014, 03:15 AM
RE: How did life arise in the universe?
(27-10-2014 02:26 AM)Stevil Wrote:  
(26-10-2014 05:47 PM)CiderThinker Wrote:  Can I answer both 1 and 4 to this?
Yes, It must have been a natural process because, well, what is an unnatural process?

Not only that but if something did create it 'un-naturally' (whatever that means) then the creator must have come about naturally. Therefore it is still part of the natural process. Otherwise you could argue that eating and using tools is unnatural.
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