How do Aethist think about veganism?
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30-04-2014, 02:07 PM
RE: How do Aethist think about veganism?
(30-04-2014 10:54 AM)Colourcraze Wrote:  Slightly related, you should take a look at this anime called Solver Spoon. It's about this kid who goes to an agricultural high school and learns about where our food comes from and the care of the animals etc. there's always some lesson to be learned at the end of each episode. I find it pretty educational and entertaining Big Grin

Also, what's a vegan do when traveling to foreign countries? Here in China, even being a vegetarian is practically unheard of. You order a veggie dish and it's gonna have little bits of meat in it or have been cooked in lard or something. Veganism is only something upper class people in first world countries can get away with (covering my bases, I'm sure there's somebody out there in India or something who's a vegan) but it's really a privileged class who can afford to be vegan. Like somebody said earlier, there's family and other parts of our lives to concern ourselves with before thinking about how that chicken felt before ended up in my belly.


Ps, given the opportunity (and legality/consent of the person/all the right circumstances) ...... I'd eat some people meat. I bet we're tasty.

You bring up some good points. I don't want to speak out of ignorance, so all I can say is that if you truly are in a culture or in circumstances where being vegan is not an option than being vegan is not an option.

As I understand it, most dishes in china are vegetarian by default, and then you add in some meat items on top of it. If you are living in china and cooking for yourself you could elect not to add the meat portions. There is a great deal of rice and vegetables in china to be had, as I understand it.

As I see it, and I might could be wrong, the issues you bring up isn't so much an one of economics but one of culture. I could see how it might be conceived as rude or in appropriate to turn down food in china if you are guest, or impossible to order a vegan dish if you are in a restaurant in china. In my opinion, this cultural pressure, and the cultural alienation you feel when you adopt veganism, is the hardest part about being vegan. Veganism IS a sacrifice, and it is difficult. You may not want to preach your veganism, or even talk about it at all, but every time you sit down to eat you are making a statement about your culture and people pick up on that. Its hard. I empathize very much with that, and I know exactly what its like to sit at a table with everyone to eat, and get disapproving stares when you turn down food. I sympathize a great deal with people who struggle with veganism for that reason. All I can say is have courage and try and stick to your ideals.
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30-04-2014, 06:32 PM
RE: How do Aethist think about veganism?
(30-04-2014 02:07 PM)Michael_Tadlock Wrote:  You bring up some good points. I don't want to speak out of ignorance.....

That's all you have been doing since you got here.

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30-04-2014, 07:57 PM
RE: How do Aethist think about veganism?
This talk about veganism makes me want to snipe 10 rabbits and eat them, just so I can feel human again.

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30-04-2014, 08:11 PM
RE: How do Aethist think about veganism?
Although I'm a bonafide meat eater, I have no problem with veganism unless someone tries to shove it down my throat like religion.
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30-04-2014, 08:14 PM
RE: How do Aethist think about veganism?
(30-04-2014 02:07 PM)Michael_Tadlock Wrote:  
(30-04-2014 10:54 AM)Colourcraze Wrote:  Slightly related, you should take a look at this anime called Solver Spoon. It's about this kid who goes to an agricultural high school and learns about where our food comes from and the care of the animals etc. there's always some lesson to be learned at the end of each episode. I find it pretty educational and entertaining Big Grin

Also, what's a vegan do when traveling to foreign countries? Here in China, even being a vegetarian is practically unheard of. You order a veggie dish and it's gonna have little bits of meat in it or have been cooked in lard or something. Veganism is only something upper class people in first world countries can get away with (covering my bases, I'm sure there's somebody out there in India or something who's a vegan) but it's really a privileged class who can afford to be vegan. Like somebody said earlier, there's family and other parts of our lives to concern ourselves with before thinking about how that chicken felt before ended up in my belly.


Ps, given the opportunity (and legality/consent of the person/all the right circumstances) ...... I'd eat some people meat. I bet we're tasty.

You bring up some good points. I don't want to speak out of ignorance, so all I can say is that if you truly are in a culture or in circumstances where being vegan is not an option than being vegan is not an option.

As I understand it, most dishes in china are vegetarian by default, and then you add in some meat items on top of it. If you are living in china and cooking for yourself you could elect not to add the meat portions. There is a great deal of rice and vegetables in china to be had, as I understand it.

As I see it, and I might could be wrong, the issues you bring up isn't so much an one of economics but one of culture. I could see how it might be conceived as rude or in appropriate to turn down food in china if you are guest, or impossible to order a vegan dish if you are in a restaurant in china. In my opinion, this cultural pressure, and the cultural alienation you feel when you adopt veganism, is the hardest part about being vegan. Veganism IS a sacrifice, and it is difficult. You may not want to preach your veganism, or even talk about it at all, but every time you sit down to eat you are making a statement about your culture and people pick up on that. Its hard. I empathize very much with that, and I know exactly what its like to sit at a table with everyone to eat, and get disapproving stares when you turn down food. I sympathize a great deal with people who struggle with veganism for that reason. All I can say is have courage and try and stick to your ideals.

"As I understand it.."
Yeah, but you don't. That's why I mentioned it. Yes, there are a lot of vegetables to be had in China, but the vast majority of the dishes are not, in fact, vegetarian. They're full of meat juice, dude. I live here. I've encountered a fair few foreigners who come over here trying to be vegetarian and I've seen them, with my own eyes, ask if a dish is vegetarian. Then somebody translates to the waiter and the conversation goes like this
"Is this dish vegetarian?"
"What? What's that?"
"She only eats vegetables. So is this dish just vegetables?"
"Oh, yeah. There are vegetables."
"So there's no meat in it?"
"A little, but it's mostly vegetables so she can eat it."
"No no, no meat. None. We need pure vegetables over here"
"Uhhhh"
And then they spend five minutes rifling through the menu to find something that's still cooked in lard and maybe one leafy appetizer.

So while vegetarians/vegans are making their "sacrifice" not to eat meat, I'm over here sacrificing my time for them to have twenty minute conversations with waiters. All the while feeling hungrier and more irritated.

Veganism is a privilege, not a sacrifice. In order to get your protein, you have either spend a lot more on your amount of vegetables or you're buying expensive, unregulated supplements that may or may not be what they say on the bottle. People in first world countries have the resources to pick and choose what they want to eat. This is probably why we see so many ridiculous food fads going on around the US, because participants can afford it.

To your sense of superiority for turning down food at a dinner table, I'm going to look disapprovingly at you for turning down anything, not just meat dishes. Do you know what kind of weird shit they eat over here sometimes? You're in a different culture, you eat it! I will disapprove if you don't try it at least (except stinky tofu. Don't nobody need to eat that). As a vegan, you're restricting yourself from a world full of potentially delicious foods! What a sad life you lead.

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30-04-2014, 08:56 PM (This post was last modified: 01-05-2014 10:24 PM by Bucky Ball.)
RE: How do Aethist think about veganism?
As an atheist I believe in veggies.
But I've never seen a rutabega. Thus I'm agnostic about rutabagas.

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30-04-2014, 09:32 PM
RE: How do Aethist think about veganism?
(30-04-2014 08:14 PM)Colourcraze Wrote:  
(30-04-2014 02:07 PM)Michael_Tadlock Wrote:  You bring up some good points. I don't want to speak out of ignorance, so all I can say is that if you truly are in a culture or in circumstances where being vegan is not an option than being vegan is not an option.

As I understand it, most dishes in china are vegetarian by default, and then you add in some meat items on top of it. If you are living in china and cooking for yourself you could elect not to add the meat portions. There is a great deal of rice and vegetables in china to be had, as I understand it.

As I see it, and I might could be wrong, the issues you bring up isn't so much an one of economics but one of culture. I could see how it might be conceived as rude or in appropriate to turn down food in china if you are guest, or impossible to order a vegan dish if you are in a restaurant in china. In my opinion, this cultural pressure, and the cultural alienation you feel when you adopt veganism, is the hardest part about being vegan. Veganism IS a sacrifice, and it is difficult. You may not want to preach your veganism, or even talk about it at all, but every time you sit down to eat you are making a statement about your culture and people pick up on that. Its hard. I empathize very much with that, and I know exactly what its like to sit at a table with everyone to eat, and get disapproving stares when you turn down food. I sympathize a great deal with people who struggle with veganism for that reason. All I can say is have courage and try and stick to your ideals.

"As I understand it.."
Yeah, but you don't. That's why I mentioned it. Yes, there are a lot of vegetables to be had in China, but the vast majority of the dishes are not, in fact, vegetarian. They're full of meat juice, dude. I live here. I've encountered a fair few foreigners who come over here trying to be vegetarian and I've seen them, with my own eyes, ask if a dish is vegetarian. Then somebody translates to the waiter and the conversation goes like this
"Is this dish vegetarian?"
"What? What's that?"
"She only eats vegetables. So is this dish just vegetables?"
"Oh, yeah. There are vegetables."
"So there's no meat in it?"
"A little, but it's mostly vegetables so she can eat it."
"No no, no meat. None. We need pure vegetables over here"
"Uhhhh"
And then they spend five minutes rifling through the menu to find something that's still cooked in lard and maybe one leafy appetizer.

So while vegetarians/vegans are making their "sacrifice" not to eat meat, I'm over here sacrificing my time for them to have twenty minute conversations with waiters. All the while feeling hungrier and more irritated.

Veganism is a privilege, not a sacrifice. In order to get your protein, you have either spend a lot more on your amount of vegetables or you're buying expensive, unregulated supplements that may or may not be what they say on the bottle. People in first world countries have the resources to pick and choose what they want to eat. This is probably why we see so many ridiculous food fads going on around the US, because participants can afford it.

To your sense of superiority for turning down food at a dinner table, I'm going to look disapprovingly at you for turning down anything, not just meat dishes. Do you know what kind of weird shit they eat over here sometimes? You're in a different culture, you eat it! I will disapprove if you don't try it at least (except stinky tofu. Don't nobody need to eat that). As a vegan, you're restricting yourself from a world full of potentially delicious foods! What a sad life you lead.

^This comment about sums it up.Drinking Beverage

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30-04-2014, 10:28 PM
RE: How do Aethist think about veganism?
(30-04-2014 07:57 PM)ThePaleolithicFreethinker Wrote:  This talk about veganism makes me want to snipe 10 rabbits and eat them, just so I can feel human again.

That's weird I started a post yesterday I deleted which described an impulse to pull over on the freeway jump a fence and murder a delicious cow, I even had BBq sauce satchels left over from kfc drive through.

Great minds think (of murder) alike.

Theism is to believe what other people claim, Atheism is to ask "why should I".
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30-04-2014, 10:34 PM
RE: How do Aethist think about veganism?
Quote:I sympathize a great deal with people who struggle with veganism

Son, are you fucking retarded?

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30-04-2014, 10:39 PM
RE: How do Aethist think about veganism?
(30-04-2014 10:34 PM)earmuffs Wrote:  
Quote:I sympathize a great deal with people who struggle with veganism

Son, are you fucking retarded?

I can relate to them a little, they do eat the food my food eats.

Theism is to believe what other people claim, Atheism is to ask "why should I".
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