How do creationists explain antibiotic resistant "super bugs"
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03-06-2015, 06:35 AM
RE: How do creationists explain antibiotic resistant "super bugs"
(03-06-2015 06:33 AM)Tomasia Wrote:  
(03-06-2015 06:22 AM)TheBeardedDude Wrote:  And I've answered that stupid question more than once. But you keep asking it.

No, you provided a series of responses that would make any politician proud. You avoided even answering here.

I'll give you a simple yes or no option. Let's see what you chose:

Do you think it's more likely that diversity of life found on earth will play out again on this hypothetical other planet in which we've implanted bacteria, than just developing into more resistance forms of bacteria? Yes or No.

Here you go, one of the MANY times your question has been addressed.

http://www.thethinkingatheist.com/forum/...#pid792038

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03-06-2015, 06:43 AM
RE: How do creationists explain antibiotic resistant "super bugs"
(03-06-2015 06:35 AM)TheBeardedDude Wrote:  
(03-06-2015 06:33 AM)Tomasia Wrote:  No, you provided a series of responses that would make any politician proud. You avoided even answering here.

I'll give you a simple yes or no option. Let's see what you chose:

Do you think it's more likely that diversity of life found on earth will play out again on this hypothetical other planet in which we've implanted bacteria, than just developing into more resistance forms of bacteria? Yes or No.

Here you go, one of the MANY times your question has been addressed.

http://www.thethinkingatheist.com/forum/...#pid792038

Nope, that was a politicians answer again. I gave you a yes or no option here, and you avoid it, once again, unsurprisingly. The question is about which is more likely.
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03-06-2015, 06:54 AM
RE: How do creationists explain antibiotic resistant "super bugs"
(03-06-2015 06:43 AM)Tomasia Wrote:  
(03-06-2015 06:35 AM)TheBeardedDude Wrote:  Here you go, one of the MANY times your question has been addressed.

http://www.thethinkingatheist.com/forum/...#pid792038

Nope, that was a politicians answer again. I gave you a yes or no option here, and you avoid it, once again, unsurprisingly. The question is about which is more likely.

YES. Not only is it likely to happen, it happened on Earth. Do you understand anything I write? Or are you too ignorant on evolution to actually comprehend what is being said?

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03-06-2015, 06:59 AM
RE: How do creationists explain antibiotic resistant "super bugs"
(03-06-2015 06:34 AM)TheBeardedDude Wrote:  I didn't realize you'd read up on all of the research? You must be an expert in all fields of biology and paleobiology to be able to outright reject evolution based on your clearly thorough analysis. Bowing I bow to your superior knowledge and intellect.

I don't reject evolution. I think it's the best scientific explanation we have. I do question the sort of confidence people have in it. And do note the sort of "selection pressure of the gaps" appeals.

Much of the questions I ask, where one's I'd have trouble answering, or require that I make a number of concessions, if I was being completely honest with myself. In fact to respond like you do, would require a bit of dishonesty and obstruction on my part to avoid answer seemingly problematic questions.
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03-06-2015, 07:15 AM (This post was last modified: 03-06-2015 07:25 AM by Tomasia.)
RE: How do creationists explain antibiotic resistant "super bugs"
(03-06-2015 06:54 AM)TheBeardedDude Wrote:  
(03-06-2015 06:43 AM)Tomasia Wrote:  Nope, that was a politicians answer again. I gave you a yes or no option here, and you avoid it, once again, unsurprisingly. The question is about which is more likely.

YES. Not only is it likely to happen, it happened on Earth. Do you understand anything I write? Or are you too ignorant on evolution to actually comprehend what is being said?

I can understand what is being said, I can also see how it doesn't directly answer the question I asked. This is perhaps your first time actually trying to take the question head on. So I can commend you for that.

You believe it's more likely that this bacteria would break off into a variety of lineages, extending well beyond the domain of bacteria, perhaps even lineages of conscious creatures, than that we'd more than likely just be looking at more diverse forms of bacteria, that developed a resistance to whatever selections pressures have been thrown at it.

I disagree of course. And here are my reasons. Our direct observations of bacteria when exposed to selection pressures, i.e. an anti-biotics, is that the bacteria develops a resistance to it. Bacteria already occupies every nook and corner of our planet, developing resistances that can survive our most harshest condition. Meaning that whatever ecological niches that has ever formed on our planet, bacteria has been consistently been able to adapt, and develop a resistance to.

To accept your position, would require that we ignore these very obvious facts, and take on faith, that bacteria would extend beyond it's domain, and that planet will gleam with diversity of life found on earth. For no other reason, than such diversity is what we find on earth. In reality bacteria doesn't need a variety of cumbersome developments, in order to survive or thrive in any ecological condition, the most readily available, the one's most frequently observed will suffice, and require less work, a development of a resistance would be the modus operandi.
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03-06-2015, 07:17 AM
RE: How do creationists explain antibiotic resistant "super bugs"
(03-06-2015 07:15 AM)Tomasia Wrote:  
(03-06-2015 06:54 AM)TheBeardedDude Wrote:  YES. Not only is it likely to happen, it happened on Earth. Do you understand anything I write? Or are you too ignorant on evolution to actually comprehend what is being said?

I can understand what is being said, I can also see how it doesn't directly answer the question I asked. This is perhaps your first time actually try to take the question head on. So i can commend you for that.

You believe it's more likely that this bacteria would break off into a variety of lineages, extending well beyond the domain of bacteria, perhaps even lineages of conscious creatures, than that we'd more than likely just be looking at more diverse forms of bacteria, that developed a resistance to whatever selections pressures have been thrown at it.

I disagree of course. And here are my reasons. Our direct observations of bacteria when exposed to selection pressures, i.e. an anti-biotics, is that the bacteria develops a resistance to it. Bacteria already occupies every nook and corner of our planet, developing resistances that can survive our most harshest condition. Meaning that whatever ecological niches that has ever formed on our planet, bacteria has been consistently been able to adapt, and develop a resistance to.

To accept you position, would require that we ignore these very obvious facts, and take on faith, that bacteria would extend beyond it's domain, and that planet will gleam with diversity of life found on earth. For no other reason, than such diversity is what we find on earth.

In reality bacteria doesn't need a variety of cumbersome developments, in order to survive or thrive in any ecological condition, the most readily available, the one's most frequently observed will suffice, and require less work, a development of a resistance would be the modus operandi.

It doesn't matter if you disagree, because your disagreement is based on ignorance and religious bias. Your opinion means precisely: jack shit.

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03-06-2015, 07:19 AM
RE: How do creationists explain antibiotic resistant "super bugs"
(03-06-2015 07:17 AM)TheBeardedDude Wrote:  It doesn't matter if you disagree, because your disagreement is based on ignorance and religious bias. Your opinion means precisely: jack shit.

You've been owned. Thank you for participating. Cool

J/K. But it doesn't particularly help your case when you just get all peevish and angry.
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03-06-2015, 07:21 AM
How do creationists explain antibiotic resistant "super bugs"
(03-06-2015 07:19 AM)Tomasia Wrote:  
(03-06-2015 07:17 AM)TheBeardedDude Wrote:  It doesn't matter if you disagree, because your disagreement is based on ignorance and religious bias. Your opinion means precisely: jack shit.

You've been owned. Thank you for participating. Cool

You're cute when you're a dumbass.

No wait, cute is not the right word... Consider ... Maybe it's more so that you are bland and unsurprising and are no different than any other other arrogant religious sheep.

Being nice is something stupid people do to hedge their bets
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03-06-2015, 07:22 AM
How do creationists explain antibiotic resistant "super bugs"
I'm not angry, I'm just baffled by the ignorance that you think your opinion on established science matters.

Being nice is something stupid people do to hedge their bets
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03-06-2015, 09:23 AM
RE: How do creationists explain antibiotic resistant "super bugs"
(03-06-2015 05:34 AM)Tomasia Wrote:  Selection pressures is basically a naturalist version of the God of the gaps, rather than particularly acknowledging the unknowns, awaiting further knowledge, we appeal to selection pressures, even when those supposed selection pressures are clearly unknown.

Nonsense. In many cases we know the selection pressures.

We don't in this case because it is a hypothetical scenario. Taking our lack of knowledge about a hypothetical scenario and asserting that that state of affairs informs all thinking about selection pressure is not apt, and renders your comparison a false equivalence.
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