How does one recover from religious trauma syndrome???
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22-11-2016, 12:10 PM
How does one recover from religious trauma syndrome???
I dont have any more fear of hell or punishment...and I go to therapy every week...andcI journal and walk too...any more ideas, advice or suggestions??? Thanks....
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22-11-2016, 12:29 PM
RE: How does one recover from religious trauma syndrome???
Have you tried the Recovering From Religion site?
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22-11-2016, 12:31 PM
RE: How does one recover from religious trauma syndrome???
(22-11-2016 12:10 PM)jason197754 Wrote:  I dont have any more fear of hell or punishment...and I go to therapy every week...andcI journal and walk too...any more ideas, advice or suggestions??? Thanks....

I still have brief flashes where the fear hits me. The frequency has decreased over time. Time helps but time can't be helped along.

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22-11-2016, 01:39 PM
RE: How does one recover from religious trauma syndrome???
(22-11-2016 12:31 PM)TheBeardedDude Wrote:  
(22-11-2016 12:10 PM)jason197754 Wrote:  I dont have any more fear of hell or punishment...and I go to therapy every week...andcI journal and walk too...any more ideas, advice or suggestions??? Thanks....

I still have brief flashes where the fear hits me. The frequency has decreased over time. Time helps but time can't be helped along.

I also think connecting to an atheist community can help after losing your religious one. I think it can feel very isolating for the church to be your world and then to lose that due to disbelief. Finding a community with like-minded people can really help things along.
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22-11-2016, 01:41 PM
RE: How does one recover from religious trauma syndrome???
The more you learn about the facts and arguments surrounding religions - historical, archeological, philosophical, moral, etc. - the more confident you will become in your atheism. Stick around these forums for awhile. There are many really knowledgeable people here. I highly recommend the pinned threads in the Atheism and Theism forum, especially the ones by Bucky Ball and goodwithoutgod. Read, watch videos, listen to podcasts about atheism. If you spend a few hours a week learning, it won't be long before things won't seem as bad.

Side note:
I left Catholicism around age 20, got sidetracked in new age garbage for awhile and became an atheist somewhere around age 23 or 24 (I'm 53 now). I simply had my own logical reasons for leaving religion and did not read up on atheist arguments or engage in discussions. The internet didn't even exist then. So I just went on with my life minus religion. Until about 5 years ago, I still had occasional fears of "what if I'm actually wrong and end up in hell". About 5 years ago is when I started visiting atheist websites, listening to podcasts, and watching videos. It's also when those fears disappeared 100% and have never returned.

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22-11-2016, 02:06 PM (This post was last modified: 22-11-2016 02:31 PM by jennybee.)
RE: How does one recover from religious trauma syndrome???
(22-11-2016 01:41 PM)Impulse Wrote:  The more you learn about the facts and arguments surrounding religions - historical, archeological, philosophical, moral, etc. - the more confident you will become in your atheism. Stick around these forums for awhile. There are many really knowledgeable people here. I highly recommend the pinned threads in the Atheism and Theism forum, especially the ones by Bucky Ball and goodwithoutgod. Read, watch videos, listen to podcasts about atheism. If you spend a few hours a week learning, it won't be long before things won't seem as bad.

Side note:
I left Catholicism around age 20, got sidetracked in new age garbage for awhile and became an atheist somewhere around age 23 or 24 (I'm 53 now). I simply had my own logical reasons for leaving religion and did not read up on atheist arguments or engage in discussions. The internet didn't even exist then. So I just went on with my life minus religion. Until about 5 years ago, I still had occasional fears of "what if I'm actually wrong and end up in hell". About 5 years ago is when I started visiting atheist websites, listening to podcasts, and watching videos. It's also when those fears disappeared 100% and have never returned.

Residual brainwashing creates those fears. It's very normal and it's also how you know you were conditioned to a fear response. If you were never exposed to this way of thinking, you would never have these fears or even know who God was. If you grew up outside of mainstream society in a cargo cult, for example, you would worship the arrival of an airplane. God and hell would not even be on your radar.

I read a book awhile back on brainwashing and religious cults (and yes, Christianity is a religious cult as it meets almost every single characteristic of cult behavior). In the book, one woman, who was in a religious cult, was told by a group leader that if she left the cult, her babies would be stillborn. As a result, that fear stuck with her long after she left the cult and she had tremendous anxiety over becoming pregnant--even though she no longer held onto those same beliefs.

If anxiety strikes, I think it helps to remind yourself that religion is a learned behavior. I also think it's helpful to look at other religions, such as the cargo cult--a religion most of us in the modern world would dismiss as a bunch of silly beliefs and use that as a basis for the Outsider Test for Faith by John Loftus. If you have no problem saying that the beliefs of the cargo cult are absurd, then you should hold your own religion to the same scrutiny as it also has equally absurd aspects (talking snake, talking donkey, a person being turned into a pillar of salt, curing disease with spit and dirt, a magical genie who lives in the clouds granting wishes and so on). This way of thinking helps to recondition your brain and helps to change the way it perceives religion and with that, its reaction to it as a fear response.

*Here's a video on a cargo cult, btw. I've posted this before, but it's a good example of how religions vary between cultures and how beliefs can develop.



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28-11-2016, 04:18 PM
RE: How does one recover from religious trauma syndrome???
(22-11-2016 02:06 PM)jennybee Wrote:  
(22-11-2016 01:41 PM)Impulse Wrote:  The more you learn about the facts and arguments surrounding religions - historical, archeological, philosophical, moral, etc. - the more confident you will become in your atheism. Stick around these forums for awhile. There are many really knowledgeable people here. I highly recommend the pinned threads in the Atheism and Theism forum, especially the ones by Bucky Ball and goodwithoutgod. Read, watch videos, listen to podcasts about atheism. If you spend a few hours a week learning, it won't be long before things won't seem as bad.

Side note:
I left Catholicism around age 20, got sidetracked in new age garbage for awhile and became an atheist somewhere around age 23 or 24 (I'm 53 now). I simply had my own logical reasons for leaving religion and did not read up on atheist arguments or engage in discussions. The internet didn't even exist then. So I just went on with my life minus religion. Until about 5 years ago, I still had occasional fears of "what if I'm actually wrong and end up in hell". About 5 years ago is when I started visiting atheist websites, listening to podcasts, and watching videos. It's also when those fears disappeared 100% and have never returned.

Residual brainwashing creates those fears. It's very normal and it's also how you know you were conditioned to a fear response. If you were never exposed to this way of thinking, you would never have these fears or even know who God was. If you grew up outside of mainstream society in a cargo cult, for example, you would worship the arrival of an airplane. God and hell would not even be on your radar.

I read a book awhile back on brainwashing and religious cults (and yes, Christianity is a religious cult as it meets almost every single characteristic of cult behavior). In the book, one woman, who was in a religious cult, was told by a group leader that if she left the cult, her babies would be stillborn. As a result, that fear stuck with her long after she left the cult and she had tremendous anxiety over becoming pregnant--even though she no longer held onto those same beliefs.

If anxiety strikes, I think it helps to remind yourself that religion is a learned behavior. I also think it's helpful to look at other religions, such as the cargo cult--a religion most of us in the modern world would dismiss as a bunch of silly beliefs and use that as a basis for the Outsider Test for Faith by John Loftus. If you have no problem saying that the beliefs of the cargo cult are absurd, then you should hold your own religion to the same scrutiny as it also has equally absurd aspects (talking snake, talking donkey, a person being turned into a pillar of salt, curing disease with spit and dirt, a magical genie who lives in the clouds granting wishes and so on). This way of thinking helps to recondition your brain and helps to change the way it perceives religion and with that, its reaction to it as a fear response.

*Here's a video on a cargo cult, btw. I've posted this before, but it's a good example of how religions vary between cultures and how beliefs can develop.




Watching stuff about religious cults can be therapeutic, you'll realize that you're not the only one that can be fooled, some of this religious stuff is so bizarre.

Mormons-WTF?

Scientlogy-WTF??!!

Once you understand how people can be duped, and how easily they can be duped, I suppose it's a matter of accepting our lot as silly primates and learning that believing in silly things is kind of what we do.

I guess it beats flinging poo? Hobo

Gods derive their power from post-hoc rationalizations. -The Inquisition

Using the supernatural to explain events in your life is a failure of the intellect to comprehend the world around you. -The Inquisition
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01-12-2016, 05:11 PM
RE: How does one recover from religious trauma syndrome???
I have never heard about a religious trauma syndrome but I understand that coming out of religion can be a traumatic experience. Many of us struggle for years and years.
What helped me, was talking it all out and also writing it all down. All my angers about it, all my feelings about it, all my fears. Mostly I did small rants and for a while I was more than happy to debate every fucktard on the internet. But it went away at some point when all my frustration about religion had went away.
Took a few years though.

You are in good hands here. If you need to vent that stuff, or debate it, or check on some weird ideas you might still have, you are in the right place.
Welcome to your new life, welcome to reason.
And good luck on your jouney.

"Freedom is the freedom to say that 2+2=4" - George Orwell (in 1984)
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