How many of you find a price like $199.99 insulting?
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01-03-2012, 07:04 AM
RE: How many of you find a price like $199.99 insulting?
(29-02-2012 09:35 PM)KVron Wrote:  $199.99 is not $200.

I'm sure you have seen the mathematical proofs that 1 = 0, yes? On that basis, 199.99 will be 200.

I vaguely recall a BBC radio 4 program about inventions and there was a phone in vote for the best one during the show. I think the 99pence coin was a popular choice.

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02-03-2012, 02:28 AM
RE: How many of you find a price like $199.99 insulting?
(01-03-2012 07:04 AM)DLJ Wrote:  I'm sure you have seen the mathematical proofs that 1 = 0, yes? On that basis, 199.99 will be 200.

If 1 = 0, then religion is true.

And we're all going to heaven.
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02-03-2012, 03:21 AM
RE: How many of you find a price like $199.99 insulting?
(02-03-2012 02:28 AM)rook2004 Wrote:  
(01-03-2012 07:04 AM)DLJ Wrote:  I'm sure you have seen the mathematical proofs that 1 = 0, yes? On that basis, 199.99 will be 200.

If 1 = 0, then religion is true.

And we're all going to heaven.

He meant to say bad proofs that are actually wrong.

Sort of like,

Presupposition-point numbers have their
The process:
P1-0 = (.0)
P2-1 = (.0,1)
P3-2 = (.0,1,2)
P4-3 = (.0,1,2,3)
P5-4 = (.0,1,2,3,4)
...

[S6]-point number
CM-I do not know the item number
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02-03-2012, 03:40 AM
RE: How many of you find a price like $199.99 insulting?
(02-03-2012 03:21 AM)mysticjbyrd Wrote:  
(02-03-2012 02:28 AM)rook2004 Wrote:  
(01-03-2012 07:04 AM)DLJ Wrote:  I'm sure you have seen the mathematical proofs that 1 = 0, yes? On that basis, 199.99 will be 200.

If 1 = 0, then religion is true.

And we're all going to heaven.

He meant to say bad proofs that are actually wrong.

Sort of like,

Presupposition-point numbers have their
The process:
P1-0 = (.0)
P2-1 = (.0,1)
P3-2 = (.0,1,2)
P4-3 = (.0,1,2,3)
P5-4 = (.0,1,2,3,4)
...

[S6]-point number
CM-I do not know the item number

I meant this kinda thing:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XVNSloR7sZg
or this (if you 99cents are recurring)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lm1FEJW5RbQ

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02-03-2012, 05:43 AM (This post was last modified: 02-03-2012 05:46 AM by craniumonempty.)
RE: How many of you find a price like $199.99 insulting?
(01-03-2012 07:04 AM)DLJ Wrote:  
(29-02-2012 09:35 PM)KVron Wrote:  $199.99 is not $200.

I'm sure you have seen the mathematical proofs that 1 = 0, yes? On that basis, 199.99 will be 200.

I vaguely recall a BBC radio 4 program about inventions and there was a phone in vote for the best one during the show. I think the 99pence coin was a popular choice.

All proofs that I have seen equating 1 and 0 have flaws. Kind of like Creationist "theories" have flaws. 199.99 wouldn't equal 200 unless the 9 was a repeating decimal. .999... (repeating infinitely) is 1. It's hard to wrap our heads around sometimes, but they are equal. If you stop anywhere along that repeating decimal, then it's no longer equal to 1, but it can be as close as we can get at the time (which is not the same thing).

http://marketing-bulletin.massey.ac.nz/V...ershaw.pdf

interesting paper... There might be more out there (with current data) that I would like to see. I've heard (I'd have to research) that even people creating tax legislation use this data when to make sure it doesn't end in 9 or 5, so that it seems less. Either way, the research seems to show that it does help the sale of the product.

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02-03-2012, 06:03 AM
RE: How many of you find a price like $199.99 insulting?
I think this kind of "mind control" marketing is pathetic, I don't know one person who feels he/she is paying less for that cent, specially since we don't have one cent coins over here, our lowest is 5 cents. Lucky enough, we have a new law now that it says that if the total of a purchase has cents, it must be rounded down to the nearest 5 cent multiple, so if they use too much of that .99 cents crap they loose all their change, and we have a coin scarcity problem over here so everyone started rounding up their prices and we are a happier country thanks to that Big Grin

PS: I made up that happier country part... but I think is correct anyway Tongue

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03-03-2012, 03:39 AM
RE: How many of you find a price like $199.99 insulting?
(26-02-2012 01:29 PM)Zat Wrote:  We all know that the price is $200 plus tax.
The implication in the price full of nines is that we are total idiots who can not see through this really transparent and obvious manipulation of our perceptions.
Yet, people learnt to live with it, as with so many other idiotic techniques of capitalist brainwashing.
I bought a washing machine a year ago and the price tag was $599.99 – I told the sales person, in a relieved voice: “thanks god it isn’t $600 – I couldn’t afford that!”
She stared at me, not understanding the irony.
Are we, as a society that far gone?
The .99 prices were invented by my countryman, Tomas Bata. He was a genius of marketing and management and built a shoemaking business that went global and withstood Nazis and Commies. He wasn't a bad guy, took care of his employees better than anybody else and went example for them all. I think he had an office in the factory in a big elevator with glass walls, so everybody could see he's there working and everybody could reach him.

Yeah, the prices are a shameless piece of psychology, but far from the only one today used in markets. There are much less obvious methods of manipulating our subconscious minds and wallets. The way the supermarket shelves are arranged as a maze, so you first encounter the best looking stuff, making you more willing to buy something. Or how the maze first leads you through useless crap before you get to what you usually buy, so chances are you also buy something along the way. Yeah, the science of marketing psychology turned us into lab rats, for the noble purpose of increasing consumption and waste of our mother Earth.
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03-03-2012, 08:27 AM
RE: How many of you find a price like $199.99 insulting?
Actually, yes, yes it does piss me off.

It pisses me off knowing people are actually fooled by it.
It pisses me off that I am treated as one of these people.
It pisses me of knowing that I myself do not have full autonomy and someone is taking advantage of that, legally.
And last, but not least, it pisses me off that people with minds that actually fall for this are allowed to breed.

Yaaaay capitalism, right?

"We Humans are capable of greatness." -Carl Sagan
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03-03-2012, 08:49 AM (This post was last modified: 03-03-2012 08:55 AM by craniumonempty.)
RE: How many of you find a price like $199.99 insulting?
(02-03-2012 03:40 AM)DLJ Wrote:  I meant this kinda thing:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XVNSloR7sZg
or this (if you 99cents are recurring)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lm1FEJW5RbQ

I must have missed this post.. For the second one, I know that 0.999...=1, there is no dispute over that.

However, the first one, I have seen this before, I'd like to approach it differently here:

Imagine we do have an infinite line A ( 1+1+1+1... ) and another infinite line B ( 1+1+1+1... ). Now A was to cancel out 1 for 1 line B, we might get 1-1+1-1... = 0 as they are both infinite. Now say we push down B (rather, we put a gap of 1 in it) so that 1 unit won't be canceled out of A, so A is now seemingly 1 unit larger than A even though they are still both infinite lines ( 1 + (-1+1) + (-1+1) ... ). Cancelling them out now will leave 1, but they are still both infinite, however, we moved something in line B to change the equation. They are no longer the same kind of infinity. You could say that you removed 1 from B, but 1 from infinity is still infinity (depending on who you talk to), however, when you cancel them out from each other, you are left with 1 and not 0. Does that prove that 1=0, or that we are missing some understanding in our definition of infinity?

The solution is that we have now is that the associative law can't be applied freely over an infinite sum unless it's absolutely convergent... If you stop at any one point along the sum 1-1+1-1... you will either be at 1 or 0, depending on where you stop. So is it convergent?

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03-03-2012, 05:04 PM
RE: How many of you find a price like $199.99 insulting?
(03-03-2012 08:49 AM)craniumonempty Wrote:  
(02-03-2012 03:40 AM)DLJ Wrote:  I meant this kinda thing:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XVNSloR7sZg
or this (if you 99cents are recurring)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lm1FEJW5RbQ

I must have missed this post.. For the second one, I know that 0.999...=1, there is no dispute over that.

However, the first one, I have seen this before, I'd like to approach it differently here:

Imagine we do have an infinite line A ( 1+1+1+1... ) and another infinite line B ( 1+1+1+1... ). Now A was to cancel out 1 for 1 line B, we might get 1-1+1-1... = 0 as they are both infinite. Now say we push down B (rather, we put a gap of 1 in it) so that 1 unit won't be canceled out of A, so A is now seemingly 1 unit larger than A even though they are still both infinite lines ( 1 + (-1+1) + (-1+1) ... ). Cancelling them out now will leave 1, but they are still both infinite, however, we moved something in line B to change the equation. They are no longer the same kind of infinity. You could say that you removed 1 from B, but 1 from infinity is still infinity (depending on who you talk to), however, when you cancel them out from each other, you are left with 1 and not 0. Does that prove that 1=0, or that we are missing some understanding in our definition of infinity?

The solution is that we have now is that the associative law can't be applied freely over an infinite sum unless it's absolutely convergent... If you stop at any one point along the sum 1-1+1-1... you will either be at 1 or 0, depending on where you stop. So is it convergent?
It means that if you are subtracting the distance of 2 lines, then the point they start at doesn't matter. Also, Infinite - Infinite =/= 0 , its an indeterminate.
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