How much an adult man's femur and humerus weigh?
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02-09-2013, 08:11 AM
RE: How much an adult man's femur and humerus weigh?
(02-09-2013 07:50 AM)Mike Wrote:  
(02-09-2013 07:46 AM)Chas Wrote:  No, it couldn't possibly be the same. Think about it.Drinking Beverage

Many people say that the femur is the largest and the heaviest bone in human body but they don't say how much a femur weigh, same goes to our humerus. Idk but maybe the weight difference between the two is not very noticeable and different, maybe around several grams to several pounds. Consider

The two weights can't be the same, because a large portion of the mass is water (less than the body as a whole, but nonetheless significant) which will be lost.

Average bone density is around 1500 kg/m3 (I found this fact in several seconds).

It's thin in the middle and lumpy on the ends; my own femur is ~50cm long (I just measured my leg for this one). The average femur is ~1 inch diameter (1.3cm in radius) (I found this fact in several seconds); I can assume mine's slightly larger, because I am a slightly taller than average man and that is a flat global average.

Therefore my femur is close to 400g. I wouldn't give that any more than about +/- 30% precision, but it's a number. Assuming it's ~70% water (as the human body as a whole is - this is not true of bones, but I'm lazy so we'll use the figure), then the dry weight is ~120 g. Actually it's more than that, but still substantially less than the initial 400g.

So, you could have at least guessed!

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02-09-2013, 10:03 AM
 
RE: How much an adult man's femur and humerus weigh?
(02-09-2013 08:11 AM)cjlr Wrote:  
(02-09-2013 07:50 AM)Mike Wrote:  Many people say that the femur is the largest and the heaviest bone in human body but they don't say how much a femur weigh, same goes to our humerus. Idk but maybe the weight difference between the two is not very noticeable and different, maybe around several grams to several pounds. Consider

The two weights can't be the same, because a large portion of the mass is water (less than the body as a whole, but nonetheless significant) which will be lost.

Average bone density is around 1500 kg/m3 (I found this fact in several seconds).

It's thin in the middle and lumpy on the ends; my own femur is ~50cm long (I just measured my leg for this one). The average femur is ~1 inch diameter (1.3cm in radius) (I found this fact in several seconds); I can assume mine's slightly larger, because I am a slightly taller than average man and that is a flat global average.

Therefore my femur is close to 400g. I wouldn't give that any more than about +/- 30% precision, but it's a number. Assuming it's ~70% water (as the human body as a whole is - this is not true of bones, but I'm lazy so we'll use the figure), then the dry weight is ~120 g. Actually it's more than that, but still substantially less than the initial 400g.

So, you could have at least guessed!

Ahh at last.

I forget that the ends of our long bones such as femur and humerus is much thicker than the middle part of it. So, judging from the bones we can assume the weight difference between femur and humerus is probably not too noticeable. If your femur is 400g, then your humerus could be around 200-300g. Idk but this is just an assumption btw.
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