How to Speak Hillbilly (Appalachian English Dialect)
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14-11-2012, 06:59 PM
RE: How to Speak Hillbilly (Appalacian English Dialect)
(14-11-2012 06:43 PM)Dark Light Wrote:  
(14-11-2012 06:36 PM)cufflink Wrote:  DL,

Is yours a "double modal" dialect?

That is, in your dialect are you able to say things like "I might could go," where SAE only allows "I might be able to go"?
Yes, we use modal stacking. "Might Could" is probably the most common, and one I use as well. I even put it up in the vocabulary words.

Quote:Might-Could = There is a possibility [I, they, you] could do the thing which is being discussed.

Ah. Very good. I didn't notice that before. I ought to should've looked more carefully.

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14-11-2012, 07:28 PM
RE: How to Speak Hillbilly (Appalacian English Dialect)
I'm guilty of using a lot of these phrases....I never knew how odd it sounded!

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15-11-2012, 02:15 AM
RE: How to Speak Hillbilly (Appalacian English Dialect)
(14-11-2012 03:50 AM)HereticHick Wrote:  "You goin' up ere". "Hell naw!"
One of my favorites is "You goin' up 'ere ta' grocery store?"

I have no idea where the quick "ta" comes from. I assume it's a shortened version of "To the". Or, sometimes, "At the"; depending on how it's used.

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11-08-2013, 08:28 AM
RE: How to Speak Hillbilly (Appalachian English Dialect)
I am from the Ozarks, a colleague of mine is from Virginia. We both love language and often compare the language that both our grandparents use/used. It's interesting how the language shifted a little as Appalachians moved into the Ozarks. Thanks for your post. You can also add that much of this language is still very current in SW MO and NW AR.

(14-11-2012 12:07 AM)Dark Light Wrote:  I generally type in a mixture of my dialect (Hillbilly), Standard American, and Standard British English. Most everyone know at least the basics for AE and BrE, but I am going to teach you'ns how to speak Hillbilly English, also called Appalachian English, and Mountain Speech. I will add more as I think of more but for now I will begin with vocabulary words that you may or may not know, after that I will get into sentence structure and speech patterns. I will try my damnedest to spell it like it sounds, but that is difficult. I may tackle some phrases later on too. A lot of these have limited use, but much of them are still very current in the remote parts TN, KY, and NC. If you have any questions I will answer to the best of my ability.
  • Airish = Chilly, windy
  • Dope/Soda Water/ Sodey Water = Coke, Soda, Pop
  • Jailhouse = Jail
  • Schoolhouse = School
  • Plum = Completely, all the way, entirely
  • Brickle = Brittle
  • Mushmellon = Cantaloupe
  • Jasper = An outsider, not from the mountains, a stranger
  • Britches = Pants, usually not dress pants
  • Poke = Bag, sack
  • Young'un (Young One) = A child, or sometimes a significantly younger adult
  • You'ns = You One's, plural of you, similar to y'all
  • Yonder/Yander = Some unspecified distance
  • Right = Properly, Very, Accurately (example he is right strong, or right smart)
  • Heared = Past tense of hear, heard
  • Seed = Past tense of see, saw
  • Hollow (pronounced Holler) = Valley surrounded by mountains
  • Bald = A clearing in the mountains
  • Scald = Land that will not support plants very well
  • Skift = A dusting of snow
  • Sigoggelin = Crooked, or leaning
  • Tote = To carry, or transport
  • Gaum/Gaumed = Messed up by being cluttered or filled with dirt/grime/grease etc.
  • Haint = Ghost/Spirit
  • Afeared = Afraid
  • Chaw = A portion of chewing tobacco
  • Betwixt = Between
  • Crawdad = Crayfish, Mudbug
  • Fixin' = Getting ready or prepared for something OR A helping of food, a serving
  • Nary = None
  • Piece = An unspecified distance
  • Chancy = Unlikely, risky, doubtful
  • Wadn't - Wasn't
  • Idn't = Isn't
  • Hound = Dog, any kind (like German, and Old English)
  • Casin' (Casing) = Tire
  • Agin' = Against
  • blowed = Past tense of blow, blew
  • borned = past tense of born
  • Drug = Past tense of drag
  • Et = Past tense of eat
  • Heared-Tell/Hear-Tell = To hear from word of mouth, by gossip
  • Slop = Leftover scraps of food, usually feed to animals
  • Passel = A large group of undetermined number
  • Whup = Past Tense of whip, as in beat
  • Sweet Milk = Equals regular milk, to distinguish from buttermilk
  • Fits = Shaking, as from withdrawal or seizures, or extreme anger.
  • Knowed = Past tense of know, Knew
  • Go-Devil = A type of Maul used for splitting wood
  • Reckon = To deduce, reason, calculate, or figure.
  • Aimin' (Aiming) = Planning (Example, I wadn't aimin' on comin' over, but I reckon I can.)
  • Bloomers = Underwear, especially panties.
  • Brought up or reared = Raised up (Example, I was reared up in that holler)
  • Caty Wompus = Crooked
  • Cussin' = Cursing
  • Directly (pronounced Direckly) = Shortly, as soon as possible, in a bit.
  • Duddint = Doesn't
  • His'n = His
  • Her'n = Hers
  • Holler = Yell, shout
  • Jaw - Talk, especially when the talk is of no importance.
  • Licken = Whuppon,
  • Might-Could = There is a possibility [I, they, you] could do the thing which is being discussed.
  • Polecat = Skunk
  • Recollect (emphasis on the middle of the word) = To remember, recall
  • Mess = A serving of a particular dish (example, a mess of greens)
  • Wasper = Wasp
  • Touched = Crazy, Insane
  • Hull = Outside part of a green bean, or the act of taking this part off of the bean
  • Buggy = Shopping Cart
  • Jarfly = Cicada
  • Lightening (Lightenin') Bug = Firefly
  • Fireboard = Fireplace Mantle
Now I will try to list some sayings, some are common to all of America, others are not...
  • I don't chew my cabbage twice =I don't repeat myself.
  • Mad as a hornet OR wet hen = Very Angry
  • Meaner than a striped snake = Very Mean
  • Hotter than blue blazes = Very hot or very angry
  • Don't mean diddley squat = Don't mean anything, meaningless
  • Beats the heck out of me = I have no idea.
  • I ain't seen you in a coons age = It has been a very long time since I've seen you
  • They Lah (They Lord, Can't type it like it sounds) = Goodness gracious
  • Havn't seen hide nor hair = Havn't seen him/her, heard from them, or any other hint of them
  • Drunker than Cootey Brown = Extremely Drunk *
  • Finer than a box/can of snuff = Very fine indeed
  • Bleeding like a stuck hog = Bleeding a lot.
  • Fit to be tied = Very angry or annoyed
  • Was you born in a barn? = Shut the door.
* Cootey Brown is said to have been a person to have brothers fighting for both the Union and the Confederacy. He didn't want to fight against either so he became a drunkard until the wars end.

I will try to add more ;D Wish my great-grandpa was still alive, this is bringing back fond memories for me Smile
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12-08-2013, 07:59 AM
RE: How to Speak Hillbilly (Appalachian English Dialect)
"Sigoggelin"

"Caty Wompus"

I HAVE NEVER HEARD THESE IN MY LIFE AND I LIVE IN ALABAMA WTF ARE THESE Sadcryface
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12-08-2013, 08:36 AM
RE: How to Speak Hillbilly (Appalachian English Dialect)
Thanks for bumping this for whatever reason. I missed as I joined after the tread had been more or less disappeared.

It is a shame that between TV and other factors regional dialects have mostly disappeared in the US. As a child in California I would occasionally here the sound of Dust Bowl escapees, no more.

I can only hope that people "up in them hollers" keep it going.
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12-08-2013, 08:50 AM
RE: How to Speak Hillbilly (Appalachian English Dialect)
(12-08-2013 08:36 AM)JAH Wrote:  Thanks for bumping this for whatever reason. I missed as I joined after the tread had been more or less disappeared.

It is a shame that between TV and other factors regional dialects have mostly disappeared in the US. As a child in California I would occasionally here the sound of Dust Bowl escapees, no more.

I can only hope that people "up in them hollers" keep it going.

You need to get on skype then my friend regional accents are still going strong. It's even more fun when Hughsie tries to correct Ferdinand's pronunciation by dropping all the vowels instead of the consonants.

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12-08-2013, 11:20 AM
RE: How to Speak Hillbilly (Appalachian English Dialect)
I must say that I have trouble enough with my cell phone. Skype would add a level of complexity to my life that I do not think I would enjoy.

I, within the last two years, traveled from California along I-10 to end in New Orleans then to Tennessee and finally back to California. Admittedly I was in mostly tourist related areas but I never did notice in all that time a strong regional dialect.

Regional dialects may exist in specific areas but I do not observe it regularly. My niece who grew up in Michigan and now lives in Wisconsin has a bit of that upper midwest tone in her voice, which she denies. But other than that I have in all my travels in the US, nor in my former work related dealings when I would frequently phone other parts of the country, rarely have I encountered a strong local dialect. Subtle hints, like with my niece, but never so strong as to have trouble understanding on occasion. Not like in a bar once in Glasgow when I could barely understand the barman.

Even 40 years ago when in basic training with a lot of recruits from Appalachia and Louisiana there was only one person from Appalachia who I had to listen to carefully to understand.

Regional dialects may persist but in my personal experience rarely are they strong. The video posted above is about the strongest example I have heard in a long time and it is mostly about odd word usage not necessarily pronunciation.
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14-12-2013, 02:34 PM (This post was last modified: 14-12-2013 03:03 PM by kim.)
RE: How to Speak Hillbilly (Appalachian English Dialect)
'Priciatcha = I appreciate you /(your endeavor)

I get that one a lot - and I'm way the hell up in Kansas.
***

I want to take this moment to thank The Andy Griffith Show and The Beverly Hillbillies and Gomer Pyle, USMC for spreading snippets of these dialects throughout TV Land and on to the rest of the US.

This thread wouldn't be complete without ....



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14-12-2013, 02:48 PM (This post was last modified: 17-12-2013 06:14 AM by Anjele.)
RE: How to Speak Hillbilly (Appalachian English Dialect)
I hear this type of speech everyday...that's what I get for marrying a SC country boy. The hair doesn't stand up on the back of my neck any more when he uses the bastardized past tenses. Maybe that's because I usually have headphones on.

A couple that I didn't see on the list...

Hose pipe - one of many unnecessary double word phrases, hose would be fine
Mash - to push or press a button, or more likely out of my husband - to depress the accelerator in the car
Hamburger meat - see the first one, and what they hell else is hamburger made out of that you have to specify
Pocketbook - purse
Cut your ass - threat of a spanking

And from my uncle Andy...
Spun - past tense issue again - spend, as in, I spun all my money

I guess I am now bilingual, when we were first married there were times I had to ask my husband to spell things because I couldn't figure out what he was saying even by using context.

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