How to tell apart a teenage phase and a real change of lifestyle?
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04-11-2013, 03:22 AM
RE: How to tell apart a teenage phase and a real change of lifestyle?
(03-11-2013 08:41 PM)Misanthropik Wrote:  "Time", is the answer. I went through a lot of phases in my teens that I was 100% sure were permanent. Ideas, hobbies, beliefs, they all came and went. Even now, I'm still changing. That's why I learned long ago to never assume that where I am today is where I'll be tomorrow.

With that said, though, I have held on to some of those "phases" from my teens and even before. So, it's safe to say that they're going to stick around for a while. Either way, time is the only thing that will reveal who you will ultimately turn out to be.

For now, embrace what you are in the present, but also be willing (and ready) to change in the weeks, months and years to come.

Interesting... I hate change though, so I'm trying to embrace it a little more. I haven't been through many phases since last year though.

Music is my religion
- Jimi Hendrix
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04-11-2013, 03:27 AM
RE: How to tell apart a teenage phase and a real change of lifestyle?
(03-11-2013 10:26 AM)LadyJane Wrote:  I like this concept!

Many youth do 'try on' things in the teenage years or young adulthood to see what it's like and 'know' it more to see if it works for them. Erik Erikson (psychologist who developed theory on development) refers to this as identity vs. non-identity.

If this is something new, you are trying it on. If you like it and agree with it then it goes from something you try to a role you decide to 'be'. But no one can tell you if it's just a phase or if it will stay. Someone can say this hoping it's just a phase.

If you feel uncertain about something (atheism, guitar playing, etc) explore it more and see if it aligns with something you can identify with , explore it until you feel comfortable and confident that it is 'you'. If it is not working, move to the next thing you think might and explore it. You'll know when you've experienced, researched and worked through enough that you become satisfied.

This 'roleplaying' can happen all of our life but most of it occurs when we're young.

Thanks for the advice! Pretty informative (lack of better word).

Music is my religion
- Jimi Hendrix
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04-11-2013, 05:45 AM
RE: How to tell apart a teenage phase and a real change of lifestyle?
(04-11-2013 03:19 AM)guitarist Wrote:  
(03-11-2013 08:30 AM)sporehux Wrote:  No one re-believes in santa, it ain't no phase.
But you might find god again in the horizontal position.

In the hospital?

If medical practitioners are your thing, then yes.
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04-11-2013, 05:47 AM
RE: How to tell apart a teenage phase and a real change of lifestyle?
(04-11-2013 03:22 AM)guitarist Wrote:  
(03-11-2013 08:41 PM)Misanthropik Wrote:  "Time", is the answer. I went through a lot of phases in my teens that I was 100% sure were permanent. Ideas, hobbies, beliefs, they all came and went. Even now, I'm still changing. That's why I learned long ago to never assume that where I am today is where I'll be tomorrow.

With that said, though, I have held on to some of those "phases" from my teens and even before. So, it's safe to say that they're going to stick around for a while. Either way, time is the only thing that will reveal who you will ultimately turn out to be.

For now, embrace what you are in the present, but also be willing (and ready) to change in the weeks, months and years to come.

Interesting... I hate change though, so I'm trying to embrace it a little more. I haven't been through many phases since last year though.
As you grow, it gets somewhat easier.
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04-11-2013, 05:36 PM
RE: How to tell apart a teenage phase and a real change of lifestyle?
There's been a lot of good advice here. I think ultimately the difference between a phase and a change- as it relates to your atheism- can only ever be defined by you. Defining something as a 'phase' is accurate only in hindsight, so don't let anyone calling it that right now affect you. As others have pointed out, how we feel about things now will change and mature over time. All you have to worry about right now is to keep reading, questioning, talking to people about what you think so that when people try 'it's just a phase' you can tell them honestly that it's something you own for yourself that isn't dependant on their own definitions.
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