Hughsie rage quit Oblivion because he couldn't pick a lock
Post Reply
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
31-08-2014, 06:56 AM
RE: Hughsie rage quit Oblivion because he couldn't pick a lock
Just wait unti lyour lv 10 or 15 and you can go find Nocturnal's shrine and get the skeleton key.

Paleoliberal • English Nationalist • Zionist • Rightist • Anti-Islam • Neoconservative • Republican • Linguistic Revivalist and Purist

Happily Divorced from the Left!
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
31-08-2014, 08:32 AM
RE: Hughsie rage quit Oblivion because he couldn't pick a lock
(30-08-2014 01:35 AM)EvolutionKills Wrote:  
(29-08-2014 09:46 PM)cjlr Wrote:  A) anyone who plays Bethesda games vanilla is an idiot.

B) Bioware's best was Jade Empire. DAII is a shitshow.

I enjoy DAII, it's basically Dragon Age as seen through Mass Effect 2; and I love Mass Effect 2. It's also the only RPG that I've ever enjoyed playing a mage in, and I enjoyed the whole supporting cast much more so than in DA:O, which had some real stinkers (generic angry drunk dwarf, stereotypical sexually promiscuous Latino-elf, and boring old woman).

ME2 was idiot plot meets unnecessary darker and edgier.

DA2 had slightly better characters at the expense of worse everything else.

... this is my signature!
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
31-08-2014, 01:19 PM
RE: Hughsie rage quit Oblivion because he couldn't pick a lock
(30-08-2014 10:29 PM)Sam Wrote:  I sympathise... Lockpicking in Oblivion is a bastard.

I'll try this pin... Break! This pin... Break! How 'bout this pin... Break!

You are out of lockpicks...

Aaaaaaarrrrrrgggghhhhh....

The wonders of saving and loading though. Eventually the loading screens are etched forever into your brain...
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
31-08-2014, 01:30 PM
RE: Hughsie rage quit Oblivion because he couldn't pick a lock
I was always really good at lockpicking. But I had a friend who could not for the life of him get it down. I never could explain how to do it correctly, mostly because it was a by feel thing, so he just went the magic route. It worked for him and he never bothered to learn how to pick locks. When he got the skeleton key he just mashed the button til it opened.

(31-07-2014 04:37 PM)Luminon Wrote:  America is full of guns, but they're useless, because nobody has the courage to shoot an IRS agent in self-defense
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
31-08-2014, 01:38 PM
RE: Hughsie rage quit Oblivion because he couldn't pick a lock
(31-08-2014 01:30 PM)Revenant77x Wrote:  I was always really good at lockpicking. But I had a friend who could not for the life of him get it down. I never could explain how to do it correctly, mostly because it was a by feel thing, so he just went the magic route. It worked for him and he never bothered to learn how to pick locks. When he got the skeleton key he just mashed the button til it opened.

I do agree though that once you're used to Skyrim it's hard to go back to Oblivion and Morrowind. Skyrim makes things like lockpicking absolutely hell if you go back to Oblivion and Morrowind.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
31-08-2014, 01:53 PM
RE: Hughsie rage quit Oblivion because he couldn't pick a lock
(31-08-2014 01:38 PM)Ferdinand Wrote:  
(31-08-2014 01:30 PM)Revenant77x Wrote:  I was always really good at lockpicking. But I had a friend who could not for the life of him get it down. I never could explain how to do it correctly, mostly because it was a by feel thing, so he just went the magic route. It worked for him and he never bothered to learn how to pick locks. When he got the skeleton key he just mashed the button til it opened.

I do agree though that once you're used to Skyrim it's hard to go back to Oblivion and Morrowind. Skyrim makes things like lockpicking absolutely hell if you go back to Oblivion and Morrowind.

Skyrim went to the fallout system, it is better. I liked Oblivions system because I was really good at it but the Fallout system is just hands down better.

(31-07-2014 04:37 PM)Luminon Wrote:  America is full of guns, but they're useless, because nobody has the courage to shoot an IRS agent in self-defense
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes Revenant77x's post
31-08-2014, 03:00 PM
RE: Hughsie rage quit Oblivion because he couldn't pick a lock
(29-08-2014 01:25 PM)Ferdinand Wrote:  In my opinion, Oblivion is a game you have to get a ways into before you can actually get into it. I feel the same about Fallout. They're good games, but the beginnings are tedious and boring.

Really? I feel the complete opposite. Bethesda has a track record of sucking dick at properly scaling difficulty with level progression. Their earlier games were notoriously difficult while their most recent games are cakewalks. Fallout 3, New Vegas, and Skyrim all start off with wavering difficulty levels and just flat-line as you become higher-level.

Fallout 3's problem was resource bloating: they simply threw too many goodies your way.. By the time I finished Fallout 3, I was carrying over 75,000 caps with absolutely nothing to spend on; I had no need to buy supplies because my habit of hoarding what I scavenged in the wastes netted me over 400 stimpaks and hundreds of every other type of chem which I rarely needed to use as often as Bethesda thought I would judging from how much they just littered all over the place. Plus, my ammo for any weapon never reached below 1000 since I just kept replenishing them from fallen enemies and ammo boxes and could go good portions of the game without using one weapon, switch back to it later, and then have so much ammo from scavenging that I would never run low on it again. I simply wasn't dying because I always had something on hand to get me out of any situation. Since there was no loot to scavenge which I didn't already have in bulk, I lost the motivation for "dungeon diving", and probably didn't even end up exploring half the marked locations. Plus, it was pathetically easy to level all skills to 100 since there were skills books EVERYWHERE. For the entire last third of the game I was walking machine of death that destroyed everything in my path and the game ceased to be as enjoyable as I found it back when I was a lower level and actually faced challenges.

Skyrim is the biggest offender for lopsided level progression. You positively bulldoze your way through level ups until around level 15-20, making the early game gone in a fucking eye-blink and mid-game significantly truncated. You'll end up piddling around as an "end-game" leveled charactered for probably half the game, a fact SERIOUSLY not helped by some twit's bright idea to curtail human enemy NPC scaling at around level 25, and only putting in a handful of fixed level creatures above level 30. Only dragons scale past level 30, and in the base game they cut off at level 50; meanwhile, the player didn't used to cap out until level 81, and the latest patch completely removed a level cap at all. By level 60, you could be taking down giants with just two flurries of dual wield power attacks. The only way to counteract this walk in the park effect is to bump up the difficulty slider, which reinstates something of a challenge but then fucks up the level progression EVEN MORE. The difficulty alters the damage given and received variables, which are the same variables that control the pace most of your skills are leveled. So on legendary difficulty, the highest, and the one you'll need when you're hulking death machine, your combat skills will be inching forward like you were watching grass grow since you're only dealing a quarter of the damage you would usually be inflicting, while your armor skills are ballooning like crazy because you're receiving over twice the normal damage per hit.

That's just one of the many problems I have with Bethesda's products, but it's one of the big ones. Bethesda make fantastic, sprawling templates, but it takes modders to transform their products into excellent games that are satisfying experience throughout the entire playthrough. I truly feel conned for buying all their games on consoles where I'm stuck with the vanilla version.

/rant

Oh yeah, and Oblivion's lockpicking mechanism sucked dick, I'm glad they ditched it.

[Image: giphy.gif]
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
31-08-2014, 10:25 PM (This post was last modified: 01-09-2014 03:01 AM by EvolutionKills.)
RE: Hughsie rage quit Oblivion because he couldn't pick a lock
(31-08-2014 08:32 AM)cjlr Wrote:  
(30-08-2014 01:35 AM)EvolutionKills Wrote:  I enjoy DAII, it's basically Dragon Age as seen through Mass Effect 2; and I love Mass Effect 2. It's also the only RPG that I've ever enjoyed playing a mage in, and I enjoyed the whole supporting cast much more so than in DA:O, which had some real stinkers (generic angry drunk dwarf, stereotypical sexually promiscuous Latino-elf, and boring old woman).

ME2 was idiot plot meets unnecessary darker and edgier.

DA2 had slightly better characters at the expense of worse everything else.

Both games were more refined. Much less time dicking around in your inventory, making sure everyone is optimally equipped (like a mother fussing over her children before the first day of school), and more time playing the damn game. I like that they ditched all of your teammates wearing piecemeal armor, and just gave them unique costumes that were upgradeable; it was cleaner, less time consuming, and stopped everyone from looking like they'd just stumbled out of a thrift store. I liked how the combat was far less tedious in the sequels (DA:O was very slow and plodding, and ME1 was filled with bullet sponges). Both games made the combat feel more dynamic, and far less like you were just hammering away at a HP bar.

Were the DA2 environments a bit repetitive? Sure. Did they at least do something creative enough to justify it? Yeah. The story covered years of progress, and it really allowed a character dynamic and growth that didn't fit into the weeks long narrative of the earlier games. Kirkwall really started to feel like a city you'd lived in, even if every 'warehouse' looked the same; it didn't bother me much. Did I miss losing the custom race and unique origins from DAO? Not really, but that just made DA2 just like every other RPG that lacked that kind of setup (i.e. just about everything that wasn't DAO). By limiting the character, Bioware had more control over their narative, and I enjoyed what they did with it. I'll take the group dynamics, the Carver/Bethany interactions, a story spanning years, and an enjoyably voice acted lead (I enjoyed play both male and female Hawke) over the mute (albeit varied) protagonist in DAO. Yeah, it is style over substance; but it's a lot of style for the loss of a little substance. Also, fuck Orzammar; I'll take a few dozen copy-pasted identical warehouses over that underground pile of slow monotonous crap.

Regardless, I have thoroughly enjoyed it every time I've played it; while acknowledging that it is a different experience from DAO or other more traditional PCRPG's like Baldur's Gate or Planescape: Torment. I'm happy with the money I spent on the game, and in the end that's all that really matters to me.

Also, this is my professional opinion, as someone who went to college for Game Art & Design; so take that for what you will. Tongue

[Image: E3WvRwZ.gif]
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply
Forum Jump: