Human Cannibalism.
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10-01-2013, 12:20 PM
RE: Human Cannibalism.
(10-01-2013 01:26 AM)poolboyg88 Wrote:  Not too long ago I finished reading 'Stranger in a Strange Land', and watched 'Book of Eli', both with minimal scenes dealing with cannibalism (one spiritual, the other survival).

My question is, health wise, why is cannibalism unhealthy? Why can't the majority (not sole food source, but a large part of it) of your diet be human flesh?

I understand vague theories that diseases and toxins are transmitted easier (same species, so more compatible), or there's no nutritional value in the flesh.
Why would it be unhealthy? Meat is meat....

No reason your diet can't include human flesh. When you talk about a sole food source then you have the issue of malnutrition, but that would happen with anything. Though assuming you eat the eyes, liver, brain, and what not, than even that would be minimal.

Plenty of nutritional value in the meat. Meat is meat! Diseases are not an issue, that is why we have fire.
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10-01-2013, 12:26 PM
RE: Human Cannibalism.
(10-01-2013 05:46 AM)Birdguy1979 Wrote:  I tend to think you are a troll, however I will answer you anyway. I could not eat another human, because I have seen what they eat and the daily habits of many really make me lose my appetite. If it meant not starving to death, I would if desperate eat another person. We are animals and animals are meet. It is just that cows don't smoke cigarette's or abuse alcohol and other drugs. Honestly, I am not sure I could find another human clean enough to eat. Well at least I am not hungry any more.
Idk about you, but every time I think of bacon I think of the hog eating rancid slop and wallowing around in mud and shit, and my mouth starts watering.
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10-01-2013, 12:30 PM
RE: Human Cannibalism.
(10-01-2013 12:20 PM)Diablo Wrote:  
(10-01-2013 01:26 AM)poolboyg88 Wrote:  Not too long ago I finished reading 'Stranger in a Strange Land', and watched 'Book of Eli', both with minimal scenes dealing with cannibalism (one spiritual, the other survival).

My question is, health wise, why is cannibalism unhealthy? Why can't the majority (not sole food source, but a large part of it) of your diet be human flesh?

I understand vague theories that diseases and toxins are transmitted easier (same species, so more compatible), or there's no nutritional value in the flesh.
Why would it be unhealthy? Meat is meat....

No reason your diet can't include human flesh. When you talk about a sole food source then you have the issue of malnutrition, but that would happen with anything. Though assuming you eat the eyes, liver, brain, and what not, than even that would be minimal.

Plenty of nutritional value in the meat. Meat is meat! Diseases are not an issue, that is why we have fire.

Actually tho, humans don't have a great ratio of consumable meat (cooked or no), muscle/connective tissue are stringy and require very long cook times. Also, because of our size, toxins (including endorphin release at the time of death) would further taint the taste of the meat...


Wind's in the east, a mist coming in
Like something is brewing and about to begin
Can't put my finger on what lies in store
but I feel what's to happen has happened before...


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10-01-2013, 12:36 PM
RE: Human Cannibalism.
Really? Consider I've heard we taste a bit like roast beef. Yea, I'm in the cannibal loop, I get around. Drinking Beverage

I think in the end, I just feel like I'm a secular person who has a skeptical eye toward any extraordinary claim, carefully examining any extraordinary evidence before jumping to conclusions. ~ Eric ~ My friend ... who figured it out.
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10-01-2013, 12:42 PM
RE: Human Cannibalism.
Unsure ASkeptic...I am a little nervous that you know so much about this particular topic...eeek!

See here they are, the bruises, some were self-inflicted and some showed up along the way. - JF
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10-01-2013, 12:42 PM
RE: Human Cannibalism.
(10-01-2013 12:36 PM)kim Wrote:  Really? Consider I've heard we taste a bit like roast beef. Yea, I'm in the cannibal loop, I get around. Drinking Beverage

Wink If we did, we might have problems.


Wind's in the east, a mist coming in
Like something is brewing and about to begin
Can't put my finger on what lies in store
but I feel what's to happen has happened before...


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10-01-2013, 12:51 PM
RE: Human Cannibalism.
(10-01-2013 11:01 AM)poolboyg88 Wrote:  Aseptic Skeptic,

Technical terms aside, it seems that eating human flesh (cooked of course, and recently fresh) has no greater risk than any other animal. But I'm still lost on what exactly "Kuru" is. Does it occur no matter how healthy the person is (a disease that nearly everyone has, and so becomes concentrated in one person when eaten), or is it just in the "sick" (you can't tell who is sick, so it's like playing cannibal russian roulette)?

My previous post was in my own words, this is from Wikipedia:

Quote:Kuru is an incurable degenerative neurological disorder that is a type of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy, caused by a prion found in humans. The term "kuru" derives from the Fore word "kuria/guria" ("to shake"), a reference to the body tremors that are a classic symptom of the disease; it is also known among the Fore as the laughing sickness due to the pathologic bursts of laughter people would display when afflicted with the disease. It is now widely accepted that Kuru was transmitted among members of the Fore tribe of Papua New Guinea via cannibalism.

Kuru has a latency period of 5-20 years and in cases it's known to be up to 40 years, so people you know could have it and simply not yet have presented with any symptoms. Clearly it's specific to the Fore and anyone who shared their cannibalism (missionaries, I'm looking at you).

Kuru is (relatively famous because it was an epidemic, the only epidemic in human history that was the result of cannabilism. However, Kuru is just one type of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD), the primary human brain prion disease.

How do you get it? Eat human brains or eat anything contaminated by human spinal fluid, or even possibly by getting contaminant on any open sore. I bet medical personnel who administer lumbar punctures to procure cerebral-spinal fluid are glad they have protective gloves - nobody wants incurable fatal CJD.

What are the odds of someone you eat having it? Who knows. This isn't the kind of thing that's easy to study. Further, there are lots of ways to get CJD: The defective protein can be transmitted by contaminated harvested human brain products, immunoglobulins (IVIG), corneal grafts, dural grafts or electrode implants (acquired or iatrogenic form: iCJD); it can be inherited (hereditary or familial form: fCJD); or it may appear for the first time in the patient (sporadic form: sCJD). In the hereditary form, a mutation occurs in the gene for PrP, PRNP. Ten to 15 percent of CJD cases are inherited. (CDC). There have also been recent reports of CJD transmission through blood transfusions.

Note the scary one: sCJD: it might appear as a sporadic mutation in anyone. You could have it, I could have it, anyone could have it even if we've never eaten human flesh (yeah, right, we're atheists, aren't we?).

So to answer your question, it's extremely improbable that anyone you eat would have Kuru. The last known afflicted victim died 7 years ago so that disease may actually be completely eradicated. But don't forget the extremely long latency period. But any of us could be infected with CJD and while you won't get it from shaking hands (unless you both have open sores on your hand), you stand an extremely high risk to transmit the disease by eating an infected brain and a still significant risk by eating any of flesh from an infected carrier. Scarier still, that person could carry the disease for years before presenting any signs, so you cannot tell by simply looking at him.

So next time you're salivating over someone riding the bus next to you, remember CJD and go get yourself a cheeseburger instead.

"Whores perform the same function as priests, but far more thoroughly." - Robert A. Heinlein
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10-01-2013, 01:04 PM
RE: Human Cannibalism.
(10-01-2013 12:20 PM)Diablo Wrote:  
(10-01-2013 01:26 AM)poolboyg88 Wrote:  Not too long ago I finished reading 'Stranger in a Strange Land', and watched 'Book of Eli', both with minimal scenes dealing with cannibalism (one spiritual, the other survival).

My question is, health wise, why is cannibalism unhealthy? Why can't the majority (not sole food source, but a large part of it) of your diet be human flesh?

I understand vague theories that diseases and toxins are transmitted easier (same species, so more compatible), or there's no nutritional value in the flesh.
Why would it be unhealthy? Meat is meat....

No reason your diet can't include human flesh.

Diseases are not an issue, that is why we have fire.

Wrong. Read what I wrote above. Or this: All meat might carry diseases. Eating human flesh adds to the list of diseases, so meat isn't meat since human flesh has more possible diseases than any other. And as I said above, cooking is not a preventative measure.

Also consider this:

Prions, the infectious agent of CJD, may not be inactivated by means of routine surgical instrument sterilization procedures. The World Health Organization and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend that instrumentation used in such cases be immediately destroyed after use; short of destruction, it is recommended that heat and chemical decontamination be used in combination to process instruments that come in contact with high-infectivity tissues.

So when a doctor uses instruments on a victim of CJD, he should destroy those instruments. If not, he should use both heat and chemical sterilization.

Also consider that bovine spongiform encephalopathy (mad cow disease) is a bovine prion disease extremely similar to CJD. Simply cooking the beef was found insufficient to decontaminate the meat. The UK slaughtered (without processing any of them for food) over 4 million cows to eradicate the disease.

So fire or no fire, this disease is a very big issue; simply cooking infected meat is not enough.

"Whores perform the same function as priests, but far more thoroughly." - Robert A. Heinlein
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10-01-2013, 01:05 PM
RE: Human Cannibalism.
(10-01-2013 12:42 PM)Anjele Wrote:  Unsure ASkeptic...I am a little nervous that you know so much about this particular topic...eeek!
Pshaw, I only eat babies. Just gotta know how to prepare em is all, since CJD is known to be hereditary.

"Whores perform the same function as priests, but far more thoroughly." - Robert A. Heinlein
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10-01-2013, 02:32 PM
RE: Human Cannibalism.
Every time someone brings up cannibalism I immediately think of Mein Teil.


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