Hymns, anyone?
Post Reply
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
29-10-2013, 02:33 PM
RE: Hymns, anyone?
(29-10-2013 02:14 PM)Minimalist Wrote:  I can't stand that sappy, sickening, jesus shit that those fools think is music.

You can call it that if you like, but I just have to disagree with you. Here try Skillet. Just give it a chance.



Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
29-10-2013, 02:38 PM
RE: Hymns, anyone?
(29-10-2013 02:14 PM)Minimalist Wrote:  


PS I like this haha
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
04-11-2013, 04:20 AM
RE: Hymns, anyone?
(29-10-2013 02:33 PM)LostandInsecure Wrote:  
(29-10-2013 02:14 PM)Minimalist Wrote:  I can't stand that sappy, sickening, jesus shit that those fools think is music.

You can call it that if you like, but I just have to disagree with you. Here try Skillet. Just give it a chance.




I like some of skillet and casting crowns, Toby Mac, etc. but it's not the same as A Capella hymns. It's the acapella harmonies I'm missing.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
04-11-2013, 09:55 AM
RE: Hymns, anyone?
Colourcraze is right that the harmony is what makes hymns special.

The music can be very beautiful a capella or grand and majestic with the addition of a pipe organ. I have an old beat up hymnal that I still play from occasionally and also think playing hymns are a great way to practice sight reading and transposing on the piano.

Contemporary worship music, on the other hand, I can totally do without. The trite sentimentality is bad enough, but when they repeat choruses and phrases ad nauseum without at least doing anything somewhat musically interesting they drive me nuts. The only thing worse is when they take one of my favorite hymns and ruin it by creating a contemporary arrangement. Censored

I think it would be a shame to reject religious art just because of the message. Even though I wouldn't place them anywhere near the level of Mozart's Requiem or Handel's Messiah, I personally include hymns in the same general category.

"I feel as though the camera is almost a kind of voyeur in Mr. Beans life, and you just watch this bizarre man going about his life in the way that he wants to."

-Rowan Atkinson
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes Can_of_Beans's post
04-11-2013, 10:10 AM
RE: Hymns, anyone?
(04-11-2013 09:55 AM)Can_of_Beans Wrote:  Colourcraze is right that the harmony is what makes hymns special.

The music can be very beautiful a capella or grand and majestic with the addition of a pipe organ. I have an old beat up hymnal that I still play from occasionally and also think playing hymns are a great way to practice sight reading and transposing on the piano.

Contemporary worship music, on the other hand, I can totally do without. The trite sentimentality is bad enough, but when they repeat choruses and phrases ad nauseum without at least doing anything somewhat musically interesting they drive me nuts. The only thing worse is when they take one of my favorite hymns and ruin it by creating a contemporary arrangement. Censored

I think it would be a shame to reject religious art just because of the message. Even though I wouldn't place them anywhere near the level of Mozart's Requiem or Handel's Messiah, I personally include hymns in the same general category.

Some of the poetry is pretty cool also .. especially in the English tradition. The rising and falling lines are like breathing in and out, and some of it remarkably musical. There are a few places in the US and England where the congregations (not the choirs), are so "tuned in" and musically educated, they routinely do them in 4 (or more) parts, and a couple actually even do the descants spontaneously, (which occasionally can conflict, and results in a somewhat humorous hodge-podge of sound).

Insufferable know-it-all.Einstein
Those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music - Friedrich Nietzsche
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 2 users Like Bucky Ball's post
04-11-2013, 10:22 AM
RE: Hymns, anyone?
(04-11-2013 10:10 AM)Bucky Ball Wrote:  Some of the poetry is pretty cool also .. especially in the English tradition. The rising and falling lines are like breathing in and out, and some of it remarkably musical. There are a few places in the US and England where the congregations (not the choirs), are so "tuned in" and musically educated, they routinely do them in 4 (or more) parts, and a couple actually even do the descants spontaneously, (which occasionally can conflict, and results in a somewhat humorous hodge-podge of sound).

Yes! This is the kind of church I went to. The whole congregation singing, and singing in 4 parts! The descants were few, usually if one person started it, then every lady who thought she was a soprano would join in...
We never had a choir. Or an organ. The only thing there was besides our voices was a pitch pipe that the song leader blew at the beginning of the song.


Also @can of beans, I couldn't agree more about Mozart and the like! I am a big fan of those epic pieces. When I was in college I was in a women's choral group and we sang some really amazing Latin and German stuff. I miss singing like that.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
04-11-2013, 10:38 AM (This post was last modified: 05-11-2013 06:08 AM by Bucky Ball.)
RE: Hymns, anyone?
(04-11-2013 10:22 AM)Colourcraze Wrote:  
(04-11-2013 10:10 AM)Bucky Ball Wrote:  Some of the poetry is pretty cool also .. especially in the English tradition. The rising and falling lines are like breathing in and out, and some of it remarkably musical. There are a few places in the US and England where the congregations (not the choirs), are so "tuned in" and musically educated, they routinely do them in 4 (or more) parts, and a couple actually even do the descants spontaneously, (which occasionally can conflict, and results in a somewhat humorous hodge-podge of sound).

Yes! This is the kind of church I went to. The whole congregation singing, and singing in 4 parts! The descants were few, usually if one person started it, then every lady who thought she was a soprano would join in...
We never had a choir. Or an organ. The only thing there was besides our voices was a pitch pipe that the song leader blew at the beginning of the song.


Also @can of beans, I couldn't agree more about Mozart and the like! I am a big fan of those epic pieces. When I was in college I was in a women's choral group and we sang some really amazing Latin and German stuff. I miss singing like that.

We have a standing joke, in the Choral Society in San Diego, (besides all our bird and animal noises, which usually works best when there is an unsuspecting visiting director), for the Mozart Requiem, in the sequence, (Dies Irae), with the FFF "Rex traemendae majestatis", we all belt out "SEX traemendae ... " It cracks them up for a few minutes.

Insufferable know-it-all.Einstein
Those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music - Friedrich Nietzsche
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 2 users Like Bucky Ball's post
Post Reply
Forum Jump: