I am an Ex-Mormon.
Post Reply
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
16-03-2015, 03:58 PM
RE: I am an Ex-Mormon.
I was a convert at 21, started questioning a few years ago and have become an atheist. I also live in Southern Utah. It's not as hardcore Mormondom here but the church is still pretty strong. I keep my apostasy on the quiet side because of family issues, but it is very hard to keep my beliefs, or lack thereof on the back burner when my kids are being exposed to the Mormon faith.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
16-03-2015, 05:16 PM
RE: I am an Ex-Mormon.
Wow. Thanks for the explanation.Thumbsup

"If we are honest—and scientists have to be—we must admit that religion is a jumble of false assertions, with no basis in reality.
The very idea of God is a product of the human imagination."
- Paul Dirac
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
17-03-2015, 09:41 AM
RE: I am an Ex-Mormon.
Greetings Dark Phoenix, thanks for starting the thread and for sharing.

I'm not a Christian ... like many other Christians.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
17-03-2015, 11:44 AM
RE: I am an Ex-Mormon.
(13-03-2015 06:34 AM)RobbyPants Wrote:  This might be a bit off-topic, but it's current, and I'm curious about your opinions on it, Dark Phoenix. Do you think it means anything about Mormonism on a larger level, or is this just a secular thing?

http://www.npr.org/2015/03/12/392590001/...exemptions

It looks like they want religious exemptions in the bill, but that mainly seems to apply to religious organizations. Other than that, LGBT people would get protections against discrimination. Do individual members seem to be warming up on the issue, or are they all pretty well in lock-step with the church?

I don't mind. This is certainly related.

For starters, this anti-discrimination bill is a wonderful thing, something Utah needs, and it has been a success. LGBT people are now able to appeal wrongful termination and eviction when they suspect it is on the basis of their gender or sexual orientation, where before they had no voice. This is excellent news for anyone who is in support of human rights.

Do I have any problem with the content of the bill? No. The religious exemptions make sense in a secular democracy. The exemptions promote the free speech of everyone involved, as well as patching up the wall of separation between church and state.

"Religious exemptions" makes it sound as though religious people are being given permission to continue to discriminate openly, but that is not the case. They are simply protected from reprisals such as loss of employment or housing as a result of exercising their freedom of speech on these matters.

I am still absolutely opposed to their views, which I find in-human and despicable. The church is certainly supporting and attempting to grow ideas that are a blight on our human rights record. I believe in their right be wrong and to hold ugly opinions, but I hope to see them lose the war of ideas.

Do I smell a rat in all this? Yes. Is this a political stunt? Yes.

The church stated that they have no intention of changing their doctrines or policies. Homosexuality will remain a punishable immoral act in their church. They have been explicit in their hopes that their support of the bill will grant them a reprieve from their critics. The church has made a good decision for bad reasons. Their heart is not in this, and until they recognize the immorality of their ways, I don't think they should get any credit. I don't think any organization should get kudos for acting with commonplace and normal ethical sense.

Religion is the sigh of the oppressed creature, the heart of a heartless world, just as it is the spirit of a spiritless situation. The abolition of religion as the illusory happiness of the people is required for their real happiness.

-Karl Marx
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply
Forum Jump: