I can't fool myself into believing in god anymore, now I'm too depressed I wanna die.
Post Reply
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
23-10-2014, 02:08 PM
RE: I can't fool myself into believing in god anymore, now I'm too depressed I wanna die.
(23-10-2014 12:14 PM)Bishoy.Adel Wrote:  how did you come to terms with the fact that you're uncovered, that you, your family, your wife/husband, the celebrities you love and the universe itself will not be there anymore, how do you continue everyday knowing that if you died today, that'll be it!!
Time is the most precious and wasted resource. Once spent it can never be reclaimed. Make the most of it while you can. Enjoy today, look forward to what tomorrow might bring. Enjoy life while you have it, don't throw it away worrying about the inevitability of death.
Death will come soon enough, it will take care of itself. You need to plan and focus on life.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes Stevil's post
23-10-2014, 02:12 PM
RE: I can't fool myself into believing in god anymore, now I'm too depressed I wanna die.
I know how you feel. The thing I struggled with for a long time, and still struggle with, is mortality. I have lost a lot of sleep laying in bed thinking about. When I became aware of the athiest community I found answers I wasn't able to find on my own. We are still going to die. We are still "alone", in the sense that there is no father figure watching out for us. But we have eachother. We have this moment, and likely tomorrow. If you really think about it, I mean really, really consider what an enternity in heaven would actually be like, I think you will conclude that mortality is actually better. Death is easy. You are alive one moment, and then you are gone. You don't regret anything, or miss being alive, or consider the nothingness and the void. An eternity passes by in an instant, like a dreamless, timeless, unfeeling sleep.

This video really inspired me. Check it out





Christopher Hitchens helped me to realize how intrinsicly de-valueing enternal life and worship actually is.





This video by seth is great. Really gets at what is wrong with original sin, and how much the christian world view warps our understanding and values.





The simplest answer I can give you is this; the truth has no obligation to be convenient, to be easy to understand, or to be desirable. The truth is the truth. You can hide from it if you want, but you and I and most atheist are just incapable of doing that. The only other choice is to despair or to accept it. I choose to accept. Everything in life that was good before still is good. God gives us nothing but comfort for the unknown; in this world love, pleasure, and beauty are just as wonderful and just as necessary without god. Breath life in, making a connection, try and make a difference, but carry no ego - no delusions of grandeur. We die; everyone dies, everything will come to an end. That doesn't make it worthless. Far from it, that is precisely what makes it precious.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 4 users Like Michael_Tadlock's post
23-10-2014, 02:31 PM (This post was last modified: 24-10-2014 03:45 AM by The Polyglot Atheist.)
RE: I can't fool myself into believing in god anymore, now I'm too depressed I wanna die.
I think I understand how you're feeling. I've been an atheist for just over a year and I still sometimes think about death and the fact that, well, you're just going to vanish eventually. Your body, but especially your own consciousness. It's a tough change from believing in an immortal life, but since you cannot wish things to become true, you have to deal with reality. I'm sorry if this sounds a bit harsh, it does for me as well, but we must be realist at some point.

However, this makes the time you have on this Earth even more precious, because you don't get another shot, it's a miracle (pun intended) that you exist in this world, because you got the chance of experiencing the universe, even if for a brief period of time. So make the most of it, I'm sure you'll appreciate more the time you spend with your parents, pets, relatives, friends and love.

Even if there is no "ultimate meaning" to life given to you by some supernatural being, your life is not meaningless. Your life has meaning in everything you do, even when you're just being kind to others (something a bit rare nowadays by the way). You give your own life meaning. Einstein, Hitchens, Sagan, Carlin, and many others are all dead. However, would you say their existence was meaningless? I've discovered Hitchens when he had unfortunately already and prematurely passed away, but the videos of his on Youtube, the quotes, have enriched me and I'm sure they still enrich people to this day and will continue to do so. He's gone, but I won't certainly say that his actions were meaningless. Quite the opposite.

孤独 - The Out Crowd
Life is a flash of light between two eternities of darkness.
[Image: Schermata%202014-10-24%20alle%2012.39.01.png]
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes The Polyglot Atheist's post
23-10-2014, 03:04 PM
RE: I can't fool myself into believing in god anymore, now I'm too depressed I wanna die.
Maybe this will explain and prepare you for what may come for you next and while the article specifically addresses physical death I think it also applies to the "death" of an idea such as immortality.

The 5 Stages of Loss and Grief
By JULIE AXELROD

The stages of mourning and grief are universal and are experienced by people from all walks of life. Mourning occurs in response to an individual’s own terminal illness, the loss of a close relationship, or to the death of a valued being, human or animal. There are five stages of normal grief that were first proposed by Elisabeth Kübler-Ross in her 1969 book “On Death and Dying.”

In our bereavement, we spend different lengths of time working through each step and express each stage with different levels of intensity. The five stages do not necessarily occur in any specific order. We often move between stages before achieving a more peaceful acceptance of death. Many of us are not afforded the luxury of time required to achieve this final stage of grief.

The death of your loved one might inspire you to evaluate your own feelings of mortality. Throughout each stage, a common thread of hope emerges: As long as there is life, there is hope. As long as there is hope, there is life.

Many people do not experience the stages in the order listed below, which is okay. The key to understanding the stages is not to feel like you must go through every one of them, in precise order. Instead, it’s more helpful to look at them as guides in the grieving process — it helps you understand and put into context where you are.

All, keep in mind — all people grieve differently. Some people will wear their emotions on their sleeve and be outwardly emotional. Others will experience their grief more internally, and may not cry. You should try and not judge how a person experiences their grief, as each person will experience it differently.

1. Denial and Isolation
The first reaction to learning of terminal illness or death of a cherished loved one is to deny the reality of the situation. It is a normal reaction to rationalize overwhelming emotions. It is a defense mechanism that buffers the immediate shock. We block out the words and hide from the facts. This is a temporary response that carries us through the first wave of pain.

2. Anger
As the masking effects of denial and isolation begin to wear, reality and its pain re-emerge. We are not ready. The intense emotion is deflected from our vulnerable core, redirected and expressed instead as anger. The anger may be aimed at inanimate objects, complete strangers, friends or family. Anger may be directed at our dying or deceased loved one. Rationally, we know the person is not to be blamed. Emotionally, however, we may resent the person for causing us pain or for leaving us. We feel guilty for being angry, and this makes us more angry.

Remember, grieving is a personal process that has no time limit, nor one “right” way to do it.
The doctor who diagnosed the illness and was unable to cure the disease might become a convenient target. Health professionals deal with death and dying every day. That does not make them immune to the suffering of their patients or to those who grieve for them.

Do not hesitate to ask your doctor to give you extra time or to explain just once more the details of your loved one’s illness. Arrange a special appointment or ask that he telephone you at the end of his day. Ask for clear answers to your questions regarding medical diagnosis and treatment. Understand the options available to you. Take your time.

3. Bargaining
The normal reaction to feelings of helplessness and vulnerability is often a need to regain control–

If only we had sought medical attention sooner…
If only we got a second opinion from another doctor…
If only we had tried to be a better person toward them…
Secretly, we may make a deal with God or our higher power in an attempt to postpone the inevitable. This is a weaker line of defense to protect us from the painful reality.

4. Depression
Two types of depression are associated with mourning. The first one is a reaction to practical implications relating to the loss. Sadness and regret predominate this type of depression. We worry about the costs and burial. We worry that, in our grief, we have spent less time with others that depend on us. This phase may be eased by simple clarification and reassurance. We may need a bit of helpful cooperation and a few kind words. The second type of depression is more subtle and, in a sense, perhaps more private. It is our quiet preparation to separate and to bid our loved one farewell. Sometimes all we really need is a hug.

5. Acceptance

Reaching this stage of mourning is a gift not afforded to everyone. Death may be sudden and unexpected or we may never see beyond our anger or denial. It is not necessarily a mark of bravery to resist the inevitable and to deny ourselves the opportunity to make our peace. This phase is marked by withdrawal and calm. This is not a period of happiness and must be distinguished from depression.

Loved ones that are terminally ill or aging appear to go through a final period of withdrawal. This is by no means a suggestion that they are aware of their own impending death or such, only that physical decline may be sufficient to produce a similar response. Their behavior implies that it is natural to reach a stage at which social interaction is limited. The dignity and grace shown by our dying loved ones may well be their last gift to us.

Coping with loss is a ultimately a deeply personal and singular experience — nobody can help you go through it more easily or understand all the emotions that you’re going through. But others can be there for you and help comfort you through this process. The best thing you can do is to allow yourself to feel the grief as it comes over you. Resisting it only will prolong the natural process of healing.

“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man’s reasoning powers are not above the monkey’s.”~Mark Twain
“Ocean: A body of water occupying about two-thirds of a world made for man - who has no gills.”~ Ambrose Bierce
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes Full Circle's post
23-10-2014, 05:31 PM (This post was last modified: 23-10-2014 05:34 PM by Tartarus Sauce.)
RE: I can't fool myself into believing in god anymore, now I'm too depressed I wanna die.
Have you ever considered the opposite?

Just why is it that value is given to eternal life anyway? I honestly can't think of anything begetting more meaninglessness than the condition of eternity. For starters, it doesn't exist in actuality within this universe, just as a concept. More directly, it's nigh impossible to frame purpose when there is no conclusion/goal to strive for. You'd just be caught in a continual stasis; your actions would appear meaningless since they hold no significance in the face of the monumentality of everlasting existence.

Why is it we read books? Because we know its contents will inevitably produce a conclusion; conclusions give context and meaning to all events preceding it. Would you really want to read a book that never ends? Would you even bother to pick it up if you knew nothing told within it would lead to a satisfying conclusion eventually? Would you care about ANYTHING that happened in that book? If your answer was no to that series of questions, then imagine the thought of LIVING a neverending story. It doesn't really sound that appealing anymore, does it?

Since our lives are finite, this gives them all the more value. As to what purpose there is within our short times on this plane of existence, that is for each individual to find out for his or herself. But to waste it all mulling over its termination is the most foolish thing one could do when given the gift of life. Death is a comfort for the dead; you have life to worry about at the moment.

[Image: giphy.gif]
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 2 users Like Tartarus Sauce's post
23-10-2014, 05:48 PM (This post was last modified: 23-10-2014 05:54 PM by GirlyMan.)
RE: I can't fool myself into believing in god anymore, now I'm too depressed I wanna die.
(23-10-2014 12:19 PM)Stark Raving Wrote:  Dude. You're stardust.


(Girly, you wanna take care of that for me?)

I got this brother.

(23-10-2014 12:14 PM)Bishoy.Adel Wrote:  I feel that I'm resisting that thought that god doesn't exist, because I feel alone and unprotected in a cruel world... I know that god doesn't exist, but I'm too depressed,

Your mission AbleDishboy, should you decide to accept it, is to celebrate and revel in your temporariness rather than be depressed by it. It is only there you can find meaning and peace in this cold soulless reality. We are billion year old carbon. As always, should you or any of your metaphysical comrades be caught in the devil's bargain, the Secretary will disavow any knowledge of your actions.







#sigh
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 2 users Like GirlyMan's post
23-10-2014, 06:05 PM (This post was last modified: 23-10-2014 06:17 PM by GirlyMan.)
RE: I can't fool myself into believing in god anymore, now I'm too depressed I wanna die.
(23-10-2014 05:31 PM)Tartarus Sauce Wrote:  Just why is it that value is given to eternal life anyway? ... Since our lives are finite, this gives them all the more value.

Eternity deprives life of all meaning.

#sigh
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 3 users Like GirlyMan's post
23-10-2014, 06:28 PM
RE: I can't fool myself into believing in god anymore, now I'm too depressed I wanna die.
Dear OP:

Since when has a vacation not been worth it because at some point it came to an end?
Since when has a meal not been delicious because you took the last bite?
Since when has a pet been any less meaningful after they died?
Since when has time with friends and family only been meaningful if another time to be together will come?

Since when?

I prefer fantasy, but I have to live in reality.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 5 users Like Adrianime's post
23-10-2014, 06:55 PM
RE: I can't fool myself into believing in god anymore, now I'm too depressed I wanna die.
Here ya go Stark.






And just for good measure:




But now I have come to believe that the whole world is an enigma, a harmless enigma that is made terrible by our own mad attempt to interpret it as though it had an underlying truth.

~ Umberto Eco
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 6 users Like evenheathen's post
23-10-2014, 08:27 PM
RE: I can't fool myself into believing in god anymore, now I'm too depressed I wanna die.
(23-10-2014 12:14 PM)Bishoy.Adel Wrote:  I was a christian till 15, a friend was slapped on the face for being a christian so I left Christianity because what's the point in praying to a god that won't protect his "children"... after 3 years I returned to the church, and after a year and a half I started reading about science, and I saw that the logic was with the big bang and evolution not a god that created the world in 6 days and created a man from the dust and a woman from his rib, since then I'm an atheist, I'm now 21 years old, and I would want to believe in a protector but I can't believe in a weak god, I can't believe in a god that lets a kid be slapped for believing in him because this god promised that he will be with us till the end of times, I can't believe in a god that doesn't fulfill his promises, but this isn't the problem.

I feel that I'm resisting that thought that god doesn't exist, because I feel alone and unprotected in a cruel world... I know that god doesn't exist, but I'm too depressed, I lost my motives to live, I mean my motives are my family and my "future love" but what's the point in living for people that will die and never be there anymore!!!I mean I want to die myself because what's the point in waiting for death? I now find myself sometimes singing christian songs, and whenever I'm near a church I enter, I don't know why but it seems that I can't just accept the thought that there's no purpose for us and we will die eventually and everything we made will have no meaning (I mean the universe itself will die someday), So I want to ask the atheists here how did you come to terms with the fact that you're uncovered, that you, your family, your wife/husband, the celebrities you love and the universe itself will not be there anymore, how do you continue everyday knowing that if you died today, that'll be it!! in college I was talkative and to some extent social and so but now I'm too blue and depressed to even talk to people because I now am without hope, please help me to accept the fact that there's no god, and please everybody, don't be mean to me for posting this question.

You're taking your first steps into a whole new world... Well, its the same old world, but viewed through new eyes.

It seems that the majority of people who leave religion and become atheists go through exactly the same thing as you are.

Its only temporary, part of the deconversion process...

Try to focus on the positive aspects... You're now officially a free thinker. Thumbsup

[img]

via GIPHY

[/img]
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 2 users Like Sam's post
Post Reply
Forum Jump: