I have a Dog-sized hole in my heart.
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16-04-2012, 01:33 PM
RE: I have a Dog-sized hole in my heart.
In the back of my mind I was trolling for Stark to respond. Big Grin
Thanks for the advice. You and Dom, et. al., are bringing up the very issues I felt I need to address but wasn't sure what those topics were until I read your posts.
I have considered two dogs, but was thinking it would be better to get one at a time. Or is that faulty thinking ?

It was just a fucking apple man, we're sorry okay? Please stop the madness Laugh out load
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16-04-2012, 02:50 PM
RE: I have a Dog-sized hole in my heart.
It's not really faulty, but if you are sure you want two, there are a lot of advantages to getting them at the same time.

. If you're cleaning up poop, it's easier to clean two piles at once, than spending the next three years with a pup in the house.

. When you train them, it wil be easier for them to distinguish between a command directed at one or both of them if they learn it together.

.once one of them learns a command, the other wil pick it up from the first. So it's not much more effort than training a single dog.

. Depending on breed, they are less likely to act out if they have a constant companion. They still will chew your shoes when you go out, but they'll do it less until they learn that it's not ok. Chewing, garbage eating, etc, are often due to boredom.

. By getting them at the same time, you don't have to go through a ranking period where they determine their rank between each other within the pack. Often people think it's a jealousy period, but it's really just figuring out what to do with the new dog.

. They will have an easier time learning to socialize because they will spend their puppyhood with socializing as a part of daily life. This doesn't make socializing with other dogs less important, but it does usually make it a little easier.

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16-04-2012, 02:54 PM
RE: I have a Dog-sized hole in my heart.
Cool! Thanks, for the info, Bro.

It was just a fucking apple man, we're sorry okay? Please stop the madness Laugh out load
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16-04-2012, 03:21 PM
RE: I have a Dog-sized hole in my heart.
I have a dog sized hole in my wall......I really need to adjust my catapult.

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16-04-2012, 03:28 PM (This post was last modified: 16-04-2012 03:34 PM by Dom.)
RE: I have a Dog-sized hole in my heart.
I agree with Stark on the ranking thing - getting two at the same time helps with that, no one will be established.

I disagree on the training, training two at the same time can be very taxing because if one disobeys the other will follow too. It works both ways. It is best to bond one of the dogs to you first, so that you will be the main person and the authority from the start. Depending on the dog's personalites, establishing authority with two unbonded dogs can be very taxing to say the least. It's easy with just one, and he'll pass the message on to the newcomer.

For that reason I would get one, get some very basic training/house manners in, and then get another. Unless they come as a pair of course - it happens quite a bit that you find two in a shelter that came in together and have been together all their lives. In that case, I would get both, definitely.

Two are also company for each other outside when you let them play. Most single dogs don't fully enjoy the yard you have to offer, they get lonely. And I agree with raving, two will likely get in less trouble than one.

I never have issues with chewed shoes and furniture, I make sure I do not ever leave the dogs alone in the house unless I have trained them to only chew their own stuff. And, with a big selection of their own stuff, and your making a fuss over these items, they will prefer them anyways. You can also just crate them if you are going out for appointments etc and you don't want them in the car or it's too hot. There are dogs with seperation anxiety though, and them you will likely always have to crate when you leave. Most dogs only need this until they are house trained, including chewing issues.

I must disagree on the pure bred versus cross bred health myth. The cross can inherit the worst traits of both breeds just as easily as the best. Cross breeding does in no way guarantee a better dog. The culprit with pure bred dogs is indiscrimate back yard breeding, inbreeding and irresponsible breeding of all descriptions. A well bred pure bred has been selected for many generations not to show any of the issues inherent in the breed as well as good temperament. With pure breds, you can do your home work, select a responsible breeder, have the pup tested before you buy, and get a guarantee.

With cross breeds it's a crap shoot, yes, you may get a dog with great health and temperament, but genes mix any way they want to and you may also get a dog riddled with the worst temperament and health issues.

That doesn't mean at all that I am dissing mixes, I have had some mixed breed dogs that were absolutely wonderful. It is certainly not a disqualifier. But I do want to debunk that persistent myth that mixed breeds have better health and temperament.

If you get a mix from a shelter (and please make it a shelter, there are many small ones who regularly pull the best dogs from the pound and spend time dealing with their health and training before adopting them out. These people know what they are doing, they know how to pick pound puppies.) you need to do little homework other than picking a good shelter. If you buy a pure bred dog, you need to study up on the breeders and find reputable ones and there is a decent chance you will end up having to drive a ways for your dog, or have it fly in. Going to backyard breeders isn't a good idea in most cases. If you must, let me know and I'll tell you how to pick the right pup for health and character.

Remember, you will live with this dog for a long time, you want the two of you to be a happy match. There are some basic things to look for so you don't end up with a fear biter etc, and then the breed/mix of breeds has to be compatible with your life style, and then the two of you have to have a certain connect.

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16-04-2012, 03:53 PM
RE: I have a Dog-sized hole in my heart.
I appreciate the feedback and even the differing views. I'm sure I'll find what works for me and my new pup or pups! I feel more emboldened after getting some input.
Thanks!

It was just a fucking apple man, we're sorry okay? Please stop the madness Laugh out load
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16-04-2012, 04:01 PM
RE: I have a Dog-sized hole in my heart.
There is nothing quite like coming home to a creature that is always thrilled by your return!

In fact, my dogs are happy when I come back downstairs, even if I have been gone five minutes.

I'm not anti-social. I'm pro-solitude. Sleepy
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16-04-2012, 04:29 PM
RE: I have a Dog-sized hole in my heart.
I,m not trying to be argumentative, I promise! But hybrid vigor is not a myth. It is well documented. Crosses can take on negative genes, but for the most part they tend to take on the better genes. Also, by choosing a cross, you vastly reduce the chances of recessive genes, which is where hybrid vigor really shines. For example, the majority of genetic heart problems are recessive, and even the same problem usually lies on different alleles in different breeds, so you are far less likely to find a cross that will express these genes. Of course there is always a chance that a dog will end up expressing a negative trait found in it's genes, but crosses reduce those chances.

Also, it's best to use caution when using terms like "fear biter". That is a trait that is 99.9% due to environment, not genetics. A fearful dog can be changed, and more importantly, avoided all together with proper upbringing and training. A dog will not pass on bad habits to another if it is corrected in the presence of the other dog. Training two dogs together simply requires an adjusted technique, and a little better communication which will only benefit both dog and trainer. For an absentee dog owner that may not be the best road, but erx indicated that he'll be home more often than not, so that can be used to his advantage.

One on one training should definitely be a part of your regimen, but in conjunction with group training, you will have calmer, more obedient, well rounded dogs. And training a dog does not have to be difficult nor mysterious. It is not a crap shoot either. temperament is far more dependent on training and communication than it is on breed. Choose a breed that works for you, but don't depend on genetics for temperament. I've worked with bold, confident chihuahas that wre virtually bomb proof, and I've worked with pit bulls that were fearful and timid.

Like Dom said, at he end you have a long term commitment. Your dogs behavior doesn't have to be determined by breed. Dogs are pack animals that bond as a group. Letting them do what comes naturally (growing up in a group with a leader and pecking order) will give you way more advantages than anthropromrphasizing them will.

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16-04-2012, 05:05 PM
RE: I have a Dog-sized hole in my heart.
(16-04-2012 08:12 AM)Erxomai Wrote:  I've been wanting to get a dog for a while now. I've finally moved into a house with a large fenced in yard, so I'm getting close to making the leap.

I wonder what sorts of tips some of you dog-lovers have. What sorts of breeds are your favorites? What sorts of things should I consider in bringing a dog home?

My favorite breed are pugs. My mom has had one for years and it's just the cutest, sweetest, funniest dog I've ever been around. So I'm partial to pugs, but they're also a bit pricey. We had dogs when I was growing up, but we always just took in strays or were given a dog, so I'm hesitant to shell out the big bucks on an animal. Plus the Vet bills can get high for a pure-bred pug.

So what say ye?

Also, ideas for names are welcome. Big Grin
I am very, very partial to rescuing dogs. Find a dog that needs you - you will end up needing him/her as much.


Seriously - don't feed the dog-breeders.

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16-04-2012, 05:11 PM
RE: I have a Dog-sized hole in my heart.
(16-04-2012 08:39 AM)frankiej Wrote:  A hole in your heart? You should have that checked out, man.
Damn you sah! I was going to use that lame joke!

Well anyways... I have a Black Labrador with 3/8 chocolate lab and 1/8 Boxer(the rest is Black Lab, His father was purebred). And he is the most tame and intelligent dog my family has ever had. He is also a prophet.

You could also get a St. Bernard Tongue

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