I have a Dog-sized hole in my heart.
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16-04-2012, 09:40 PM (This post was last modified: 16-04-2012 09:44 PM by Erxomai.)
RE: I have a Dog-sized hole in my heart.
(16-04-2012 05:11 PM)itsacow Wrote:  
(16-04-2012 08:39 AM)frankiej Wrote:  A hole in your heart? You should have that checked out, man.
Damn you sah! I was going to use that lame joke!

Well anyways... I have a Black Labrador with 3/8 chocolate lab and 1/8 Boxer(the rest is Black Lab, His father was purebred). And he is the most tame and intelligent dog my family has ever had. He is also a prophet.

You could also get a St. Bernard Tongue
I could also get a cow.


Chas, after spending some time on the interwebz today, I definitely won't be going the direction of a breeder. But it's not because I have super strong feelings about it so much as it's much cheaper to adopt!


And it appears there's a County Shelter adoption event going on this Saturday near where I live, so I plan to check out what's up. Smile



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How big would this little girl get? She's listed as a 3 month old Rhodesian Ridgeback mix. Not sure what the mix is.

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16-04-2012, 09:47 PM
RE: I have a Dog-sized hole in my heart.
What a face! Love her! Heart Heart Heart Heart Heart

I'm not anti-social. I'm pro-solitude. Sleepy
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19-04-2012, 11:58 PM
RE: I have a Dog-sized hole in my heart.
Dogs are the best. I want a million. One is enough work though, ha ha. French Bulldogs remind me of Pugs, without all the breathy mess.
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20-04-2012, 12:28 AM
RE: I have a Dog-sized hole in my heart.
Depends on how much time you're willing to invest. If you can commit to a good walk every day then you qualify to get a herding breed. Smart and fun but woe to he who leaves a herding dog unexercised for two days in a row.

Here is my new pup, Heidi Rose. She is a cross between a heeler and an aussie, something called a Texas Heeler. I picked her out off the internet from a shelter in my state. She is a lot of fun to watch run, swim and play with other dogs. This one is pretty recent. The stately looking big fluffy silver dog is my 13 year old Australian Shepherd, Fletcher.





But she also has a quiet side. This one was shot with my lap top and shows her sleeping with me in our garden bed. You can tell when she hears a squirrel. At one point she seems to see her image on the screen. I wonder what she thought of that. (Smart as hell but probably not self aware.)





Get a herder and you'll have lots of fun. Heidi weighs 55 pounds and is two years old.

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20-04-2012, 01:00 AM
RE: I have a Dog-sized hole in my heart.
These dogs look delicious.

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20-04-2012, 05:47 AM
RE: I have a Dog-sized hole in my heart.
(20-04-2012 01:00 AM)frankiej Wrote:  These dogs look delicious.
What .. no! [Note to self: turn down all dinner invites from Frankiej.]

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20-04-2012, 05:51 AM
RE: I have a Dog-sized hole in my heart.
It is either that or haggis... I'd rather have dog.

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20-04-2012, 06:44 AM (This post was last modified: 20-04-2012 07:34 AM by Dom.)
RE: I have a Dog-sized hole in my heart.
(16-04-2012 09:40 PM)Erxomai Wrote:  
(16-04-2012 05:11 PM)itsacow Wrote:  Damn you sah! I was going to use that lame joke!

Well anyways... I have a Black Labrador with 3/8 chocolate lab and 1/8 Boxer(the rest is Black Lab, His father was purebred). And he is the most tame and intelligent dog my family has ever had. He is also a prophet.

You could also get a St. Bernard Tongue

I could also get a cow.


Chas, after spending some time on the interwebz today, I definitely won't be going the direction of a breeder. But it's not because I have super strong feelings about it so much as it's much cheaper to adopt!


And it appears there's a County Shelter adoption event going on this Saturday near where I live, so I plan to check out what's up. Smile



[Image: bf708f66-0fe9-4c9f-9e13-ccf7297d3e79.jpg]
How big would this little girl get? She's listed as a 3 month old Rhodesian Ridgeback mix. Not sure what the mix is.


Rhodesians get huge and are aggressive. Maybe not the dog for you.
(16-04-2012 04:29 PM)Stark Raving Wrote:  I,m not trying to be argumentative, I promise! But hybrid vigor is not a myth. It is well documented. Crosses can take on negative genes, but for the most part they tend to take on the better genes. Also, by choosing a cross, you vastly reduce the chances of recessive genes, which is where hybrid vigor really shines. For example, the majority of genetic heart problems are recessive, and even the same problem usually lies on different alleles in different breeds, so you are far less likely to find a cross that will express these genes. Of course there is always a chance that a dog will end up expressing a negative trait found in it's genes, but crosses reduce those chances.

Also, it's best to use caution when using terms like "fear biter". That is a trait that is 99.9% due to environment, not genetics. A fearful dog can be changed, and more importantly, avoided all together with proper upbringing and training. A dog will not pass on bad habits to another if it is corrected in the presence of the other dog. Training two dogs together simply requires an adjusted technique, and a little better communication which will only benefit both dog and trainer. For an absentee dog owner that may not be the best road, but erx indicated that he'll be home more often than not, so that can be used to his advantage.

One on one training should definitely be a part of your regimen, but in conjunction with group training, you will have calmer, more obedient, well rounded dogs. And training a dog does not have to be difficult nor mysterious. It is not a crap shoot either. temperament is far more dependent on training and communication than it is on breed. Choose a breed that works for you, but don't depend on genetics for temperament. I've worked with bold, confident chihuahas that wre virtually bomb proof, and I've worked with pit bulls that were fearful and timid.

Like Dom said, at he end you have a long term commitment. Your dogs behavior doesn't have to be determined by breed. Dogs are pack animals that bond as a group. Letting them do what comes naturally (growing up in a group with a leader and pecking order) will give you way more advantages than anthropromrphasizing them will.




Yes, but..... Smile

Let's drop the pure bred/ mix discussion and agree to disagree. Probably we both agree that pure breds from backyard breeders and the disgusting puppy mills are often bad news. Even there you can still obtain an exam and guarantee before you buy, but the chances of bad genes are definitely huge that way. Indiscriminate breeding of pure bred dogs should be illegal IMO.

As to two against one: For a first time owner and inexperienced person I do very definitely NOT recommend starting with two. It confuses the person and hence the dogs. One on one is much easier when you are just getting your feet wet.

Genes do influence the disposition of the dog. You can pick the character traits out when you look at a one week old litter. And here again, yes, nature versus nurture does apply, anything can be reshaped with training, but why make a novice deal with unnecessary issues? Brains can be wired differently just like with people. Dogs with disorders are not bad dogs, just like people with disorders are as good as anyone else. But - it requires more care from the owner since the dog can't talk, it can get very complicated.

Picking the right dog is the one single most important thing a novice owner will ever do with his dog. I have owned, trained and handled many dogs, and out of the lot of them there was only one who was just incorrigible when at his home alone with his owner. Not because he couldn't learn, he was smart. He learned everything in record time, he just would not apply it when alone with his owner. He would perfectly accept his owner as authority until they were alone. A different owner may have been able to reel the dog in, but this one wasn't up to the task and it was a case of totally mismatched personalities. After a year of disaster after disaster the dog was rehomed into a country setting and all worked out after that.

So, we are looking at a first time owner and things should be easy and fun, training should be secondary to the pleasures of having a canine companion.

Maybe Erx is a dog whiz at heart and would sail right through adjusting a dog with negative tendencies, but why do that with a first dog when there is a majority of troublefree dogs out there?

Yes, with a normal dog training is easy and fun, both for the dog and the owner. Owners often think training would be a pain on the dog, but it's the opposite. From the dog's perspective, he is learning to manipulate the owner into being nice and giving love or treats or whatever is used as incentive. The dog will be eager and happy to learn and as long as each session is ended on a positive, with the dog doing something he already knows and getting lots of reward for it, that will always be so through old age and everything. You definitely can teach an old dog new tricks. And the dog will love it.

One last basic comment on training:

Remember that a dog's thinking is linear. A leads to B directly, previous occurrences are not connected. So, should you come home to a chewed shoe and just get mad, the dog will relate your coming home to your anger, not the shoe. Should you then call the dog to you and punish it, it will connect the coming when called to being punished. And now you have a screwed up relationship based simply on misunderstanding.

Some dogs are more sensitive than others, some may recover from this unless it is repeated. Others give up more easily and will just fear your coming home and avoid coming to you when called. Now we are talking about re-training, which is a lot harder than the initial training.

So, basically the main thing to understand about dogs is the linear thinking. If that understanding is firmly in place, training is a breeze.

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20-04-2012, 09:41 AM
RE: I have a Dog-sized hole in my heart.
(20-04-2012 06:44 AM)Dom Wrote:  As to two against one: For a first time owner and inexperienced person I do very definitely NOT recommend starting with two. It confuses the person and hence the dogs. One on one is much easier when you are just getting your feet wet.
Have to agree that taking on two dogs at once would be a horrible idea. Much better to bring the second dog into the home after you've bonded with doggy number one and have sorted out your expectations and communication with that dog. If you really think you might eventually like to have two, bring the second one on board when the first guy is about 5 years old. By then he should be an asset to you for training the new dog. Plus when you have to bury doggy number one, doggy number two will be there to console you. (Yes burying lots of best friends is part of the deal when you choose a species whose life expectancy is only a fifth or sixth what ours is.)

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20-04-2012, 01:13 PM
RE: I have a Dog-sized hole in my heart.
I have had a lot of luck with shelter dogs unfortunately the shelters near me are raising their prices so much that they are in the puppy mill price range of purebreds.

Pugs are cute and the ones I've dealt with were great, they aren't too crazy as some small dogs can be. I would avoid a Jack Russell unless you want a hyper dog that appears to have a crack habit.

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