I'm surprised by the de-converted
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10-06-2013, 06:41 PM
RE: I'm surprised by the de-converted
I remember my mother taking me to church up until I was about 9. It was just a habitual type thing that might have been imposed upon her during her childhood. She, all of a sudden stopped going after moving to the states (my dad was in the military). Since then they both have not once talked about religion or anything related. Most of their moral teachings were "golden-rule" related. My dad was big on common sense while my mom, just told me to be a good person no matter what religious/spiritual stance I had. with that said, I've been on my own and have naturally gravitated toward the practical teachings of Mahayana Buddhism. As a practicing Buddhist, I have no need to even address the possible existence of God since it has no impact on my experiential journey toward inner peace and happiness. I also have no obligation, under the Mahayana teachings, to believe in karmic rebirth, but rather karma during this life when it comes to the cultivating (through thinking and action) compassion. Thoughts? Could I be a Buddhist Atheist?
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10-06-2013, 06:47 PM
RE: I'm surprised by the de-converted
(10-06-2013 06:41 PM)Zazen Wrote:  I remember my mother taking me to church up until I was about 9. It was just a habitual type thing that might have been imposed upon her during her childhood. She, all of a sudden stopped going after moving to the states (my dad was in the military). Since then they both have not once talked about religion or anything related. Most of their moral teachings were "golden-rule" related. My dad was big on common sense while my mom, just told me to be a good person no matter what religious/spiritual stance I had. with that said, I've been on my own and have naturally gravitated toward the practical teachings of Mahayana Buddhism. As a practicing Buddhist, I have no need to even address the possible existence of God since it has no impact on my experiential journey toward inner peace and happiness. I also have no obligation, under the Mahayana teachings, to believe in karmic rebirth, but rather karma during this life when it comes to the cultivating (through thinking and action) compassion. Thoughts? Could I be a Buddhist Atheist?

If you not into the spiritual stuff I don't see why not.

(31-07-2014 04:37 PM)Luminon Wrote:  America is full of guns, but they're useless, because nobody has the courage to shoot an IRS agent in self-defense
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10-06-2013, 07:26 PM
RE: I'm surprised by the de-converted
My family was one of those oddball families, who (my opinion) thought they were religious, but really weren't. They (Mom and Dad) believed in god, until they died. But I doubt that either of them ever read the bible. I never heard bible quotes. They did send me to (Catholic) sunday school, which I usually skipped. It was an odd situation, I guess. When Mom was a hospice patient, she had a Catholic priest come by weekly! But she hadn't been to church for many years! I think it's fear! So, I wasn't really oppressed by my family. But, even today, if I am honest about my atheism on my Facebook page, I face a lot of anger. People don't want to die, so they cling to these foolish ideas. Frankly, I sometimes wish I had those ideas. I don't want to die either.
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10-06-2013, 07:30 PM
RE: I'm surprised by the de-converted
(10-06-2013 05:46 PM)dancefortwo Wrote:  They've completely rejected my transgender daughter. From what I've read Europeans are far more accepting of transgender people. Is this true?

I don't hear much about transgender people or people being against them. The cousin of my father is transgender (or at least claims to be) and it did cause some problems within the family but then again he was 50 and already had a wife and kids when he came out with it. His father still sees him as his son but for the rest he accepts the situation even though he's quite religious. I'm not sure how transgenders are looked upon in the US though.

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10-06-2013, 07:55 PM
RE: I'm surprised by the de-converted
(10-06-2013 07:30 PM)Crusher Wrote:  I'm not sure how transgenders are looked upon in the US though.




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10-06-2013, 07:59 PM
RE: I'm surprised by the de-converted
(10-06-2013 06:32 PM)dancefortwo Wrote:  Do you think there is too profound a difference between those recovering from religion who are now atheists and those who are life long "from birth atheists"? We, the ones brought up with no religion what so ever, can we ever understand what you have been through? Your life story is so full of undeserving sin and guilt. I never experienced the sin thing. Actually, I don't think I even knew what sin was until I was about 11 or so and even then it was very vague and I never applied it to myself.

Do you personally know other atheists who were never exposed to religion, it's just kinda the way they were raised? If so do you ever discuss this aspect of the atheist experience?

Honestly, I don't *personally* know other (declared) atheists, though I think my second-oldest brother's a... "casual atheist." Just an impression from other talks (and a complete lack of any sort of surprise or reaction when I told him I was.) My oldest brother... heavy into the church. And other than the last year and a half (roughly) of my life... I haven't gone personally *looking* for other atheists or atheist groups, other than online, since I was caring for my mom (who had cancer for the last two years of her life,) and - again - fairly serious about her religion. Which, even without me telling her I was atheist, still caused friction. (Without that religious "moral high ground" so to speak, I found it hard to even consider that someone shouldn't have the right to marry who they loved just because they were the same gender, for instance, but she went on about it. Just as an example. We ended up basically agreeing not to talk about it.)

I know there are other atheists in the area - biggest thing holding me back right now is my work schedule. Hard to meet, say, Thursday at 6 when I'm working second shift. Smile

I don't think there's necessarily a gulf - unless we keep it solely on the "raised atheist versus deconverted" line. But there are other experiences that can be very similar - how many atheists are LGBT and were afriad to "come out," or made to feel ashamed down to their bones for what they were naturally? I think *similar* experiences can be found to help understand, yes.

My little rambling blog. (More topical than this one, at least.)
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10-06-2013, 08:12 PM
RE: I'm surprised by the de-converted
(10-06-2013 06:47 PM)Revenant77x Wrote:  
(10-06-2013 06:41 PM)Zazen Wrote:  I remember my mother taking me to church up until I was about 9. It was just a habitual type thing that might have been imposed upon her during her childhood. She, all of a sudden stopped going after moving to the states (my dad was in the military). Since then they both have not once talked about religion or anything related. Most of their moral teachings were "golden-rule" related. My dad was big on common sense while my mom, just told me to be a good person no matter what religious/spiritual stance I had. with that said, I've been on my own and have naturally gravitated toward the practical teachings of Mahayana Buddhism. As a practicing Buddhist, I have no need to even address the possible existence of God since it has no impact on my experiential journey toward inner peace and happiness. I also have no obligation, under the Mahayana teachings, to believe in karmic rebirth, but rather karma during this life when it comes to the cultivating (through thinking and action) compassion. Thoughts? Could I be a Buddhist Atheist?

If you not into the spiritual stuff I don't see why not.

Atheist just means that you don't believe in a god.

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10-06-2013, 08:16 PM
RE: I'm surprised by the de-converted
(10-06-2013 08:12 PM)Dom Wrote:  
(10-06-2013 06:47 PM)Revenant77x Wrote:  If you not into the spiritual stuff I don't see why not.

Atheist just means that you don't believe in a god.

I am well aware, however not all buddhists are atheists (there are some sects that have whole pantheons) and in the context of his question I suppose secular buddhist would be a more accurate label but whatever floats his boat right.

(31-07-2014 04:37 PM)Luminon Wrote:  America is full of guns, but they're useless, because nobody has the courage to shoot an IRS agent in self-defense
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10-06-2013, 08:18 PM
RE: I'm surprised by the de-converted
(10-06-2013 06:41 PM)Zazen Wrote:  I remember my mother taking me to church up until I was about 9. It was just a habitual type thing that might have been imposed upon her during her childhood. She, all of a sudden stopped going after moving to the states (my dad was in the military). Since then they both have not once talked about religion or anything related. Most of their moral teachings were "golden-rule" related. My dad was big on common sense while my mom, just told me to be a good person no matter what religious/spiritual stance I had. with that said, I've been on my own and have naturally gravitated toward the practical teachings of Mahayana Buddhism. As a practicing Buddhist, I have no need to even address the possible existence of God since it has no impact on my experiential journey toward inner peace and happiness. I also have no obligation, under the Mahayana teachings, to believe in karmic rebirth, but rather karma during this life when it comes to the cultivating (through thinking and action) compassion. Thoughts? Could I be a Buddhist Atheist?

Sure, why not? There are many Atheist Buddhists, though I think you'd be the first on TTA, at least to my knowledge.

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10-06-2013, 10:09 PM
RE: I'm surprised by the de-converted
(10-06-2013 07:55 PM)Starcrash Wrote:  
(10-06-2013 07:30 PM)Crusher Wrote:  I'm not sure how transgenders are looked upon in the US though.




Someone sent this video to me already. Because my daughter started hormones at 19 and is now 21 she passes as female. When you start much older, especially over the age of 25 it's harder to pull off.

Two weeks ago we were out to dinner and waiting for a table and this other family was sitting there waiting as well. From their conversation I could tell they were very religious church goers. One of the girls complimented my transgender daughter on her "cute pants". She had no idea. I thought, oh if these people knew she was transgender they'd probably get up and leave.

Sorry, sorry, I'm way off topic.

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