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If you had to choose one of these states to live in, which one would it be?
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04-03-2015, 10:40 AM
RE: If you had to choose one of these states to live in, which one would it be?
(04-03-2015 08:55 AM)DLJ Wrote:  
(03-03-2015 04:23 PM)kingschosen Wrote:  ...
Oh, that was intentional.

I see my plan is working.

Intent... plan...?

It seemed like a leading question, KC. To where are you leading with this?

Consider

Forcing everyone to live in the South.

[Image: dog-shaking.gif]
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04-03-2015, 10:54 AM
RE: If you had to choose one of these states to live in, which one would it be?
(04-03-2015 10:20 AM)Nurse Wrote:  
(04-03-2015 09:34 AM)eminart Wrote:  Given THOSE choices, I think I'd stay right here in Huntsville, AL. It's better than you might think. However, I think I'd really like to live out west somewhere - not TX or CA.
Well hello, neighbor.

Huntsvegas - I'm en route now Tongue


Oh, good! There are two of us!
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04-03-2015, 12:34 PM
RE: If you had to choose one of these states to live in, which one would it be?
(03-03-2015 11:14 PM)Shadow Fox Wrote:  Mississippi!

Why?

1. It is the most religious state!

2. This quote for the top 10 most scary places to be an atheist.
Quote: I could say a lot about Mississippi. For instance, I could talk about how, when the Second Chance Prom was being organized for lesbian student Constance McMillan, the state chapter of the freaking ACLU refused to take money from the American Humanist Association and the Stiefel Freethought Foundation... because it was atheist money. I shit you not. In an e-mail message to AHA, Jennifer Carr, the fundraiser for the ACLU of Mississippi, said, "Although we support and understand organizations like yours, the majority of Mississippians tremble in terror at the word 'atheist.'" The ACLU would later apologize and accept the money; but, as Maggie Ardiente of the AHA, puts it, "We were very disappointed to see an organization that's famously known for standing up for everyone's rights -- including the right to be an atheist or humanist -- initially discriminate against us."

That's reasonably messed-up. But I want to focus instead on a much more practical, nuts-and-bolts, life-screwing-up form of anti-atheist bigotry -- child custody.

It is depressingly common for atheists to have child custody limited, or even denied, explicitly on the basis of their atheism. Cases have been documented again and again and again, in states including Michigan, Minnesota, Arkansas, Louisiana, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, and Texas. But according to Eugene Volokh of The Volokh Conspiracy, "Mississippi is the most serious offender." Volokh goes on to say, "In 2001, for instance, the Mississippi Supreme Court upheld an order giving a mother custody partly because she took the child to church more often than the father did, thus providing a better 'future religious example.' In 2000, it ordered a father to take the child to church each week, as a [lower] Mississippi court ordered... reasoning that 'it is certainly to the best interests of [the child] to receive regular and systematic spiritual training.'"

Try to imagine a judge in this country denying or limiting custody to a parent, explicitly and specifically, because they were Jewish. Because they were Mormon. Because they were Baptist. And now, try to imagine a judge in this country denying or limiting custody to a parent, explicitly and specifically because they're an atheist. You don't have to imagine it. This is real. This happens. And it happens in Mississippi more than anywhere else in the country.

3. Mississippi NEEDS us. Seriously. Why do you think those places are so messed up in their morals, crime rates, drugs and everything else etc, despite having such high religious people? They need more Atheists and free thinkers to stay behind, challenge them and change their minds one person at a time. Only by changing the worst of the worst in the bible belt can we make the whole country better.

Imagine if half the atheists in the U.S moved to the bible belt. In about what I reckon would be about five or ten years or so and we could change and educate enough people to make them all as pleasant as Massachusetts or Oregon!

Then when we all move out back, the ones we left behind would all keep it going!

There is some relevance to this, I think. Here in Texas, the first time I ever heard a real-life person (not a TV personality like Bill Maher for example) say that religion was just a bunch of hooey and while it was all fascinating it was just bullshit, was when I was in my mid-twenties. The idea that you could just reject all religion entirely was completely foreign to me. I think now, what would have happened if I hadn't had this regular Joe come into my life, if I'd never heard a regular person say this aloud? I might still be a Christian. Undecided

I think we do need more atheists here. And that, the ones who are here need to be more vocal, but speaking as an atheist here in Texas, it's very very difficult to be vocal. I know I'm not.

Anyway, just wanted to add that. Big Grin

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