If you had to deal with the disgusting shit I had to this morning
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05-03-2014, 11:03 AM
RE: If you had to deal with the disgusting shit I had to this morning
(05-03-2014 10:50 AM)Stark Raving Wrote:  Yes, two alpaca, and they will likely cohabitate with the goat and a donkey (long story).

Good match. The Alpacas will guard the goat (they love sheep and goats) and the donkey will guard the lot.

The goats I won't be much help with - I never raised anything for milk and progeny. There are things to learn there that I haven't.

I do know about Llamas, and hence, Alpacas.

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05-03-2014, 11:04 AM
RE: If you had to deal with the disgusting shit I had to this morning
(05-03-2014 10:50 AM)Stark Raving Wrote:  Yes, two alpaca, and they will likely cohabitate with the goat and a donkey (long story).

Donkey for protection of the sheep?

Also, I have a pair of alpaca-wool socks. Warmest, most comfortable socks I own. Yes

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05-03-2014, 11:10 AM
RE: If you had to deal with the disgusting shit I had to this morning
Now I want to have a farm...

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05-03-2014, 11:24 AM
RE: If you had to deal with the disgusting shit I had to this morning
(05-03-2014 11:04 AM)Chas Wrote:  
(05-03-2014 10:50 AM)Stark Raving Wrote:  Yes, two alpaca, and they will likely cohabitate with the goat and a donkey (long story).

Donkey for protection of the sheep?

Also, I have a pair of alpaca-wool socks. Warmest, most comfortable socks I own. Yes

Both Llamas and/or Alpacas as well as donkeys are commonly used to protect sheep, or goats. They do a good job, too.

Alpaca wool is the best wool, followed by Llama wool.

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05-03-2014, 11:26 AM
RE: If you had to deal with the disgusting shit I had to this morning
(05-03-2014 08:52 AM)Stark Raving Wrote:  
(05-03-2014 08:46 AM)devilsadvoc8 Wrote:  Because maggots don't do this to non-domesticated animals? This comment is so drenched in ignorance it makes my hair hurt. Please please please think just a tiny bit before you post on this forum. I don't give a crap what you post elsewhere, but kittens die when you post here

What about the comment is ignorant? I too am curious if this condition occurs often in the wild or if it's a result of domestication. (Thanks, BTW, to Dom who actually answered).

Pip, does this happen often? I'm curious because my wife and I hope to raise a few sheep of our own in the next couple years. Is there a preventative, or is it "just one of those things", like so many others on the farm. (Kinda like dealing with chickens who can't seem to figure out shitting in the nest is a bad thing)

Maggots can be found in wounds of any creature. While the hair of the animal in question may increase its risk, maggots in wounds are not something caused by man's domestication of anything.

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05-03-2014, 11:33 AM
RE: If you had to deal with the disgusting shit I had to this morning
(05-03-2014 11:26 AM)devilsadvoc8 Wrote:  
(05-03-2014 08:52 AM)Stark Raving Wrote:  What about the comment is ignorant? I too am curious if this condition occurs often in the wild or if it's a result of domestication. (Thanks, BTW, to Dom who actually answered).

Pip, does this happen often? I'm curious because my wife and I hope to raise a few sheep of our own in the next couple years. Is there a preventative, or is it "just one of those things", like so many others on the farm. (Kinda like dealing with chickens who can't seem to figure out shitting in the nest is a bad thing)

Maggots can be found in wounds of any creature. While the hair of the animal in question may increase its risk, maggots in wounds are not something caused by man's domestication of anything.

It wasn't in a wound. It was attracted to the anus because the sheep had runny stool and there was a lot of wool for the stuff to get stuck in, thus attracting the insects. Read my previous comments regarding this. Had there been no wool for the stuff to get stuck in, or no insects due to wool only naturally being dense in the winter when insects do not appear, there would have been no issue.

But because the domestic sheep is bred to produce wool year round, there was dense wool at a time when insects were active. Hence, human breeding efforts contributed to the issue.

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05-03-2014, 11:38 AM
RE: If you had to deal with the disgusting shit I had to this morning
(05-03-2014 11:26 AM)devilsadvoc8 Wrote:  
(05-03-2014 08:52 AM)Stark Raving Wrote:  What about the comment is ignorant? I too am curious if this condition occurs often in the wild or if it's a result of domestication. (Thanks, BTW, to Dom who actually answered).

Pip, does this happen often? I'm curious because my wife and I hope to raise a few sheep of our own in the next couple years. Is there a preventative, or is it "just one of those things", like so many others on the farm. (Kinda like dealing with chickens who can't seem to figure out shitting in the nest is a bad thing)

Maggots can be found in wounds of any creature. While the hair of the animal in question may increase its risk, maggots in wounds are not something caused by man's domestication of anything.
Mmmmm....I dunno bout that. We may both need to do a little more research, but I'd venture to guess that the vast majority of animals would not leave maggots in wounds, since they would habitually clean the area themselves, no?

I'm not saying man bred sheep that were susceptible to maggot infestations necessarily. But I am suggesting that the maggot infestations that are common in sheep may very well be a direct result of the way we breed them. I mean shit, if this particular animal were left without human intervention, it would likely die, and certainly lose it's ability to reproduce. I think without us, sheep would very quickly evolve to NOT get maggotty bums.

Is the difference so subtle that I'm arguing semantics? I'm highly medicated so I may not be making as much sense as I think I am. lol

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05-03-2014, 12:04 PM
RE: If you had to deal with the disgusting shit I had to this morning
(05-03-2014 11:38 AM)Stark Raving Wrote:  
(05-03-2014 11:26 AM)devilsadvoc8 Wrote:  Maggots can be found in wounds of any creature. While the hair of the animal in question may increase its risk, maggots in wounds are not something caused by man's domestication of anything.
Mmmmm....I dunno bout that. We may both need to do a little more research, but I'd venture to guess that the vast majority of animals would not leave maggots in wounds, since they would habitually clean the area themselves, no?

I'm not saying man bred sheep that were susceptible to maggot infestations necessarily. But I am suggesting that the maggot infestations that are common in sheep may very well be a direct result of the way we breed them. I mean shit, if this particular animal were left without human intervention, it would likely die, and certainly lose it's ability to reproduce. I think without us, sheep would very quickly evolve to NOT get maggotty bums.

Is the difference so subtle that I'm arguing semantics? I'm highly medicated so I may not be making as much sense as I think I am. lol

You make sense. Sheep that are not domesticated are already evolved not to get maggoty bums however. Because dense wool and insects do not occur at the same time.

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05-03-2014, 12:37 PM
RE: If you had to deal with the disgusting shit I had to this morning
(05-03-2014 11:38 AM)Stark Raving Wrote:  Mmmmm....I dunno bout that. We may both need to do a little more research, but I'd venture to guess that the vast majority of animals would not leave maggots in wounds, since they would habitually clean the area themselves, no?

I can vouch for the fact that humans can get maggots in their wounds. I have had the pleasure of removing maggots from leprous leg wounds. Also, I've personally seen maggots in patients' noses in cases of severe atrophic rhinitis. Not pleasant.

It all adds up to prove true that old song,
"...All creatures great and small...
The Lord God made them all".

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05-03-2014, 01:47 PM
RE: If you had to deal with the disgusting shit I had to this morning
(05-03-2014 11:38 AM)Stark Raving Wrote:  
(05-03-2014 11:26 AM)devilsadvoc8 Wrote:  Maggots can be found in wounds of any creature. While the hair of the animal in question may increase its risk, maggots in wounds are not something caused by man's domestication of anything.
Mmmmm....I dunno bout that. We may both need to do a little more research, but I'd venture to guess that the vast majority of animals would not leave maggots in wounds, since they would habitually clean the area themselves, no?

I'm not saying man bred sheep that were susceptible to maggot infestations necessarily. But I am suggesting that the maggot infestations that are common in sheep may very well be a direct result of the way we breed them. I mean shit, if this particular animal were left without human intervention, it would likely die, and certainly lose it's ability to reproduce. I think without us, sheep would very quickly evolve to NOT get maggotty bums.

Is the difference so subtle that I'm arguing semantics? I'm highly medicated so I may not be making as much sense as I think I am. lol

Perhaps we are arguing different points. I don't disagree that the domestication of this breed may make it susceptible to maggots in a particular part of its anatomy. However, if it had a wound or if its hair was very matted at any point of the year my point is that it would then be susceptible anyway. Maybe I was looking at Haywood's post incorrectly but maggots are a risk for any animal with or without domestication.

Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored- Aldous Huxley
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