Inaccessible accessibility
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20-02-2014, 05:48 PM
Inaccessible accessibility
So I wasn't sure where to post this so sorry if this is in the wrong spot, but I kind a need a little help with this. I was hoping you guys would help me figure out who I'm supposed to go to about proper labeling. As we know government property must be accessible to all it's citizens. So when government funds something that's supposed to be accessible for the blind and visually impaired and learning disabled is it up to them to make sure it's properly accessible? I don't know maybe it's up to the manufacturers, or the library directors, or the librarians, or just some bloody volunteers? Okay enough pussyfooting. Here's my beef I go to the library at least three times a week, as you all know I am blind. New to being blind, so I do not read braille very well, I stick to Audiobooks. For now. (Clifford the Big Red Dog, and The Lorax are kicking my ass). So I've been trying to find a law about whose job it is to make Audiobooks more accessible whether it's through braille or auditory feedback. Because everyone's been running me in circles about whose job it is to make them more accessible. I'm going back to school in June and I don't like pulling books out at random to try to do my term papers. Here's the crap I'm dealing with

Exhibit A:

[Image: 6F088BA4-40F5-41AB-B366-9190F6927142_zpsyx2au5ch.jpg][Image: 6F088BA4-40F5-41AB-B366-9190F6927142_zpsyx2au5ch.jpg][Image: D60A74D3-607E-42DA-A732-EDA647608CC5_zps9hmoplbz.jpg]


Exhibit B:

[Image: DFEF7B73-1803-416E-8B57-E3C05FF08772_zpsuezk666r.jpg]
[Image: 024D8BB9-99A6-464C-8987-969762C60451_zpsrwbaurgq.jpg][Image: CBC2A404-D581-44C7-9F0B-93A408D2AED3_zpshhmrxaow.jpg]


What I think needs to be done:

Braille over long-term would not help anyone but the blind plus it would be probably more expensive in the long run and it would get in the way of sighted people if some of the titles were too long so I thought this was a better solution

http://www.independentliving.com/prodinf...ber=756610

http://www.maxiaids.com/products/9104/Pe...ystem.html



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20-02-2014, 08:09 PM (This post was last modified: 20-02-2014 08:17 PM by Cathym112.)
RE: Inaccessible accessibility
Instead of swimming up stream, why don't you just ask the librarian to help you find what you need?

Look - pick your battles. You will have to get used to the fact that this world will not be entirely accessible to you. And instead of asking whose responsibility it is to cater to you, perhaps just ask them nicely to help you.

Everyone has burdens to carry. They adapt. Dwarfs live in a world where nothing is their height. Do they expect there to always be fountains they can reach? Or sinks they can reach? Or cars they can drive. No. They buy modified pedals.

I'll save everyone the trouble of researching because I'm very familiar with the ADA.

They can't deny you access to a building, my dear. Or refuse to serve you. That's about it.
There is no requirement that every book be in Braille, or that every audiobook cover be in Braille.

Just ask someone to help you. I get asked all the time to assist the blind onto the subway train. I even offer to help them.

You might also want to talk to someone, like a therapist or something, Hun. I hate to see you dive into depression because you seemed to be defined by your disability instead of you defining it. It consumes 90% of your threads here and I just don't think we are qualified to help you...given our heathenly nature and all.

Hug

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20-02-2014, 08:55 PM
RE: Inaccessible accessibility
I'd suggest asking that exact same question on a forum about blindness. That's not a suggestion to go away, it's just that I suspect on a forum about blindness, there's bound to be many topics about audiobooks and their accessibility.

N'est-ce pas?

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20-02-2014, 09:03 PM
RE: Inaccessible accessibility
I don't think many audio books are specifically intended for the blind, sometimes just time poor saps like me that find it hard to read and drive without vehicular homicide incidents.
A letter to company will probably get you a more fruitful response then you might expect.
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20-02-2014, 09:51 PM
RE: Inaccessible accessibility
(20-02-2014 05:48 PM)BrokenQuill92 Wrote:  What I think needs to be done:

Braille over long-term would not help anyone but the blind plus it would be probably more expensive in the long run and it would get in the way of sighted people if some of the titles were too long so I thought this was a better solution

http://www.independentliving.com/prodinf...ber=756610

http://www.maxiaids.com/products/9104/Pe...ystem.html




Why not just get a universal product code-to-speech device? Let the manufacturer do the labeling for you. Hell they do it for cash registers.

I got an inaccessible accessibility anecdote. The building I work in was built in 1974 prior to the ADA. A couple years ago we hired a guy in a wheelchair and realized we must make this building ADA compliant. I mean, for fuck's sake, it's a Government building. So we put in some pushbutton doors and wheelchair ramps and whatnot and modified the bathrooms to replace 2 stalls with one and raise the seat a bit. A recent conversation between my boss and me about George went like this.

Me: You do realize George has to anticipate when he has to piss or shit like 5 minutes in advance 'cause it takes that long to get to the bathrooms in the new building which are actually accessible to him.
Boss: That's his choice. We modified the closest bathroom from 2 stalls to one, raised the seat and added a pushbutton door.
Me: Yabut, there's a 3 foot wide support beam 3 feet in front of the door which prevents him from from making the turn to get to the stall in his wheelchair.

D'oh.

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22-02-2014, 01:34 AM
RE: Inaccessible accessibility
While I acknowledge that audibooks are great for the blind; they weren't designed for them. They are aimed at lazy people that will not pick up a book.

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22-02-2014, 07:34 PM
RE: Inaccessible accessibility
(22-02-2014 01:34 AM)Caveman Wrote:  While I acknowledge that audibooks are great for the blind; they weren't designed for them. They are aimed at lazy people that will not pick up a book.

Yeah. Or people who are driving and still want to exercise their brain. Or doing yard work and want to learn spanish at the same time. Or are working out and want to listen to books.
That sounds really lazy to me. Dodgy


I listen to them when I run. I read plenty of books - it's a favorite past time. A lot of people listen to audiobooks. Lazy? Hardly. Dodgy

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