Introduce Yourself HERE!
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27-10-2011, 01:40 PM
RE: Introduce Yourself HERE!
(27-10-2011 09:20 AM)calmyourtitsbro Wrote:  Hello.
After you see my display name, you may assume my sex.
Well bro, I am a female
I'm not sure how to really introduce myself, so don't laugh. T_T
.. Laugh & I will castrate you with my bare hands. ^-^
Hmf. Well, I am bisexual. A freak-a-zoid gamer. Agnostic "daughter" of a bitch. I don't know why my teachers try to teach me things, I want to kill zombies when I grow up. Enjoys long walks in a graveyard, surrounded by people that I love.. [dead bodies].
You may refer to me as a freak, but bitch I'm just me. (:
PM me. You won't regret it. o^-^o

That's a damn nice intro. Cool I'm curious what type of gaming you do.

(27-10-2011 12:00 PM)TheIronRuler Wrote:  I'm 17, from Israel and I live among "Jews".
My parents and their parents lived under a communist regime for about sixty years years in soviet Russia, which lead to them being not religious but they still thought of themselves as Jews. Go figure. I suppose that their repressed religion somehow became their religion, not because they were religious but because they were distinguished from their peers because they were Jews. Because of their ethnicity, not their religion (Important to note, since being a Jew is a pain in the arse... Both an identity, an ethnicity and a religion. I just want to be human).
Basically - I've stopped celebrating holidays and this year was the second year I didn't fast on Yom Kippur. The spaghetti was delicious, thank you for asking.
I'm struggling with my identity, because I AM a Jew, yet I do not believe in the ancient texts of the old Testament or any god. Though I did once think of sacrificing a goat to Baal so that he could help me with my physics exam.
You do realize that these days he has nothing to do so he's free to help, right?

I'm glad you enjoyed your spaghetti lol. Also good to hear that you've made a stand not to follow the rituals, especially when you don't believe in them.
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27-10-2011, 01:40 PM
RE: Introduce Yourself HERE!
(27-10-2011 12:00 PM)TheIronRuler Wrote:  I'm 17, from Israel and I live among "Jews".
My parents and their parents lived under a communist regime for about sixty years years in soviet Russia, which lead to them being not religious but they still thought of themselves as Jews. Go figure. I suppose that their repressed religion somehow became their religion, not because they were religious but because they were distinguished from their peers because they were Jews. Because of their ethnicity, not their religion (Important to note, since being a Jew is a pain in the arse... Both an identity, an ethnicity and a religion. I just want to be human).
Basically - I've stopped celebrating holidays and this year was the second year I didn't fast on Yom Kippur. The spaghetti was delicious, thank you for asking.
I'm struggling with my identity, because I AM a Jew, yet I do not believe in the ancient texts of the old Testament or any god. Though I did once think of sacrificing a goat to Baal so that he could help me with my physics exam.
You do realize that these days he has nothing to do so he's free to help, right?

Barukh ha-ba!

As an American Jew and an atheist, I've struggled with the identity issue myself. Years ago I went through a brief period where, if pressed, I would describe myself as "from a Jewish background" or even (which today embarrasses me) "a former Jew," since it didn't feel right, as a non-believer, to say "I'm Jewish." But as you pointed out, being Jewish is complicated: it's partly a religion, partly a culture, partly an ethnicity. "Christian atheist," "Catholic atheist," "Mormon atheist," "Muslim atheist"--those are all oxymorons; "Jewish atheist" is not.

Eventually I realized I didn't have to deny or underplay my heritage just because I didn't believe in the associated theology. And there was the historical context as well: Christians have been trying to convert Jews, often by force, for 2,000 years; I didn't want anyone to think even for a second that I had succumbed to that influence. Nowadays, if asked, I just say I'm a "secular Jew."

The great thing about being a freethinker from a rich religious-cultural tradition is that you can choose what you like and respect about it without having to swallow it whole. (Fundamentalists like to ridicule "cafeteria Christians" who pick the parts of the religion that appeal to them--but what's wrong with cafeterias? You get to see what's being served and choose the most wholesome and appealing dishes. Nothing wrong with that.) There are plenty of things to reject in Jewish tradition, but there's also the emphasis on learning; the focus on this life rather than the afterlife; the idea that you don't have to kiss up to God when he's being a dick but can argue with him, question, complain, scream at him. There are things in Judaism you can feel proud of.

I've completely given up the Jewish dietary restrictions; obviously I don't pray; I no longer celebrate the holidays. But on the yahrtsayts [anniversaries] of my parents' deaths, I light a candle--not because of any religious belief but because it's a meaningful thing to do; my mother did that for her own deceased relatives until she died, and I like carrying on that tradition. I also fast on Yom Kippur--partly for the discipline, partly for the feeling of being connected, even in a small way, to my tradition. (The other traditional thing I do on that day is read the Book of Jonah in Hebrew; it's definitely one of the better parts of the Tanakh. And it's very short.)

That said, your background and heritage don't define you. You "just want to be human"? Bravo. I wish more people felt that way. Your brothers and sisters are all of humanity, not just your fellow Jews. You live in a relatively free society; you can be what you want to be, make whatever connections you want to make. You can retain what you find meaningful in your background and reject what you don't, and you can form new associations and feel new loyalties.

Let us know what grade you got on your physics exam after the sacrifice to Baal. Wink

Religious disputes are like arguments in a madhouse over which inmate really is Napoleon.
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27-10-2011, 01:46 PM
 
RE: Introduce Yourself HERE!
(27-10-2011 01:40 PM)kineo Wrote:  That's a damn nice intro. Cool I'm curious what type of gaming you do.

Hmf. Well, I play Assassin's Creed Brotherhood, Call of Duty; All of them, but Black Ops , Left for Dead 2, Dead Island (PC) , League of Legends (PC), World of Warcraft (PC), & more.
You know that you want to game with me sometime.
My last gaming buddy actually quit playing with me because... We were playing L4D2 & he kept dying and I kept saving him & he got mad. xD
27-10-2011, 05:24 PM
RE: Introduce Yourself HERE!
(27-10-2011 01:40 PM)cufflink Wrote:  Barukh ha-ba!

As an American Jew and an atheist, I've struggled with the identity issue myself. Years ago I went through a brief period where, if pressed, I would describe myself as "from a Jewish background" or even (which today embarrasses me) "a former Jew," since it didn't feel right, as a non-believer, to say "I'm Jewish." But as you pointed out, being Jewish is complicated: it's partly a religion, partly a culture, partly an ethnicity. "Christian atheist," "Catholic atheist," "Mormon atheist," "Muslim atheist"--those are all oxymorons; "Jewish atheist" is not.

Eventually I realized I didn't have to deny or underplay my heritage just because I didn't believe in the associated theology. And there was the historical context as well: Christians have been trying to convert Jews, often by force, for 2,000 years; I didn't want anyone to think even for a second that I had succumbed to that influence. Nowadays, if asked, I just say I'm a "secular Jew."

English doesn't have a very well-defined way of distinguishing between Jews as a people, Jewish culture and Judaism. In almost every situation all aspects are just called Jewish. I can imagine it must make self-identity hard at times for Jews who realise Judaism isn't for them :/

It's not something I've ever really considered, I guess because my cultural background has very little overt importance in my life.

"Sin, young man, is when you treat people as things" - Granny Weatherwax in Carpe Jugulum by Terry Pratchett.
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27-10-2011, 06:09 PM
RE: Introduce Yourself HERE!
Hello.

I found out about this website from watching a youtube video about the Christian national registry of atheists. I've been an atheist since I was 13. I'm tired of hearing about how atheists are bad people who don't hear morals...so I joined this site.
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28-10-2011, 02:20 PM
RE: Introduce Yourself HERE!
(27-10-2011 06:09 PM)Atheist#6667 Wrote:  Hello.

I found out about this website from watching a youtube video about the Christian national registry of atheists. I've been an atheist since I was 13. I'm tired of hearing about how atheists are bad people who don't hear morals...so I joined this site.

who don't HAVE morals*
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28-10-2011, 06:30 PM
 
RE: Introduce Yourself HERE!
(27-10-2011 01:40 PM)cufflink Wrote:  
(27-10-2011 12:00 PM)TheIronRuler Wrote:  I'm 17, from Israel and I live among "Jews".
My parents and their parents lived under a communist regime for about sixty years years in soviet Russia, which lead to them being not religious but they still thought of themselves as Jews. Go figure. I suppose that their repressed religion somehow became their religion, not because they were religious but because they were distinguished from their peers because they were Jews. Because of their ethnicity, not their religion (Important to note, since being a Jew is a pain in the arse... Both an identity, an ethnicity and a religion. I just want to be human).
Basically - I've stopped celebrating holidays and this year was the second year I didn't fast on Yom Kippur. The spaghetti was delicious, thank you for asking.
I'm struggling with my identity, because I AM a Jew, yet I do not believe in the ancient texts of the old Testament or any god. Though I did once think of sacrificing a goat to Baal so that he could help me with my physics exam.
You do realize that these days he has nothing to do so he's free to help, right?

Barukh ha-ba!

As an American Jew and an atheist, I've struggled with the identity issue myself. Years ago I went through a brief period where, if pressed, I would describe myself as "from a Jewish background" or even (which today embarrasses me) "a former Jew," since it didn't feel right, as a non-believer, to say "I'm Jewish." But as you pointed out, being Jewish is complicated: it's partly a religion, partly a culture, partly an ethnicity. "Christian atheist," "Catholic atheist," "Mormon atheist," "Muslim atheist"--those are all oxymorons; "Jewish atheist" is not.

Eventually I realized I didn't have to deny or underplay my heritage just because I didn't believe in the associated theology. And there was the historical context as well: Christians have been trying to convert Jews, often by force, for 2,000 years; I didn't want anyone to think even for a second that I had succumbed to that influence. Nowadays, if asked, I just say I'm a "secular Jew."

The great thing about being a freethinker from a rich religious-cultural tradition is that you can choose what you like and respect about it without having to swallow it whole. (Fundamentalists like to ridicule "cafeteria Christians" who pick the parts of the religion that appeal to them--but what's wrong with cafeterias? You get to see what's being served and choose the most wholesome and appealing dishes. Nothing wrong with that.) There are plenty of things to reject in Jewish tradition, but there's also the emphasis on learning; the focus on this life rather than the afterlife; the idea that you don't have to kiss up to God when he's being a dick but can argue with him, question, complain, scream at him. There are things in Judaism you can feel proud of.

I've completely given up the Jewish dietary restrictions; obviously I don't pray; I no longer celebrate the holidays. But on the yahrtsayts [anniversaries] of my parents' deaths, I light a candle--not because of any religious belief but because it's a meaningful thing to do; my mother did that for her own deceased relatives until she died, and I like carrying on that tradition. I also fast on Yom Kippur--partly for the discipline, partly for the feeling of being connected, even in a small way, to my tradition. (The other traditional thing I do on that day is read the Book of Jonah in Hebrew; it's definitely one of the better parts of the Tanakh. And it's very short.)

That said, your background and heritage don't define you. You "just want to be human"? Bravo. I wish more people felt that way. Your brothers and sisters are all of humanity, not just your fellow Jews. You live in a relatively free society; you can be what you want to be, make whatever connections you want to make. You can retain what you find meaningful in your background and reject what you don't, and you can form new associations and feel new loyalties.

Let us know what grade you got on your physics exam after the sacrifice to Baal. Wink

It's insane because I don't know how to define myself. I live in Israel, and like many of my peers I did not care for these rituals even when I was still preforming them. Why? Because our identity is anchored in our damn proclamation of Independence (Which is as close as you will get to a constitution here), as a Jewish Democratic country with an Arab Minority. Then you don't feel this need to preserve your believes. Then you begin to question your believes.
Then... You end up with no identity. Simple.
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30-10-2011, 02:31 AM
RE: Introduce Yourself HERE!
Hi, I'm 20 and I live in India. I used to be an agnostic from the start. My parents were always deep believers and when they urged me to pray, I used to be so reluctant and I didn't find any specific reason to pray because I used to believe, whatever be the path I'm going to take, requires my effort, self-motivation, interest and my decisive power. So why should I believe in something that isn't visible and should have faith in it just because someone says it can influence my life. I used to be rational regarding the way I think, always demanding a valid reason. And after sometime we faced a lot of problems financially due to some hasty decision took by my father. Even during those times my family members didn't lose faith in the so-called 'supreme being'. But on the other end I knew it was due those decisions made by my father everything happened. And they were still praying to get out of troubles and to someone who's non-existential. And it was time when I became firm upon being an atheist. Later my father became paralyzed due to pressure he faced upon his mind. Neither faith nor hope saved him. I worked out my way through a job clearing out the debts. And that's how I've been living my life now.

Apart from all this I'm quite proficient in maths. A metal-head too Smile

Think rational. Be real.
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30-10-2011, 01:14 PM
RE: Introduce Yourself HERE!
(30-10-2011 02:31 AM)whizz Wrote:  Hi, I'm 20 and I live in India. I used to be an agnostic from the start. My parents were always deep believers and when they urged me to pray, I used to be so reluctant and I didn't find any specific reason to pray because I used to believe, whatever be the path I'm going to take, requires my effort, self-motivation, interest and my decisive power. So why should I believe in something that isn't visible and should have faith in it just because someone says it can influence my life. I used to be rational regarding the way I think, always demanding a valid reason. And after sometime we faced a lot of problems financially due to some hasty decision took by my father. Even during those times my family members didn't lose faith in the so-called 'supreme being'. But on the other end I knew it was due those decisions made by my father everything happened. And they were still praying to get out of troubles and to someone who's non-existential. And it was time when I became firm upon being an atheist. Later my father became paralyzed due to pressure he faced upon his mind. Neither faith nor hope saved him. I worked out my way through a job clearing out the debts. And that's how I've been living my life now.

Apart from all this I'm quite proficient in maths. A metal-head too Smile

Wow that is awesome. I haven't met anyone from India before. What kind of metal do you like? I like mostly Death Metal myself. Cannibal Corpse and such.
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31-10-2011, 12:33 AM
RE: Introduce Yourself HERE!
I'm a atheist that lives in the southern part of the United States, yeah the "Bible belt". I have always been an atheist but I have recently become active in promoting atheism. It was a real breath of fresh air to find websites like the thinking atheist and freedom from religion foundation. I honestly can't say that in my regular life I know any other atheist to talk to. I sometimes feel like the only sound minded person in a group of religious nuts. The Internet has really sparked a fire in me for intelligent thinkers and science. I have recently read the God dissolution and letter to a Christian nation. I found these books to be very inspiring. I just listened to my first thinking atheist podcast tonight. Will somebody tell me the name of the host of the show?
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