Is Driving Hard?
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06-06-2017, 08:52 AM
RE: Is Driving Hard?
Never drove a manual, don't want to. Seems useless to know now and days, like how to control a horse drawn carriage. Driving an automatic though is very easy with practice. I love driving and take any chance I get to go on long drives. It can be intimidating at first especially if you are in a place with a lot of traffic and roads but you get used to it.




(06-06-2017 08:06 AM)OakTree500 Wrote:  Are there rules for teaching people in the US? In the UK you're allowed to drive a car if there is a person in there with you, who has held a valid UK license for 5 years I believe.You also need to be on the insurance for the vehicle as a named driver.

Over here it's still the "normal" thing to go via a driving school, as you learn in their car, which the has dual controls, which you can also use for the test accordingly. The only minor thing is it costs a fair amount now, one of the reasons it took me so long.

You have to first get a permit where you can legally drive with someone who holds a license for a period of time before you are allowed to take a test to see if you are ready to have a license. As much as it is said, we do not just hand out licenses over here.

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06-06-2017, 09:00 AM
RE: Is Driving Hard?
(06-06-2017 08:52 AM)JDog554 Wrote:  You have to first get a permit where you can legally drive with someone who holds a license for a period of time before you are allowed to take a test to see if you are ready to have a license. As much as it is said, we do not just hand out licenses over here.
Here in the UK, you apply for a "provisional" license, which you can learn on (with the aforementioned adult/driving school involved). To pass onto a "full" driving license, there is a theory test, consisting of 40+ multiple choice questions and a hazard perception test, and THEN pass your practical driving test. The UK motor department (the DVLA) are on about making it harder as well.

You can also ride a motor bike of a certain size on a learners license as well, [once you pass a basic road safty exam, that then lasts for two years].

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06-06-2017, 09:16 AM
RE: Is Driving Hard?
(06-06-2017 09:00 AM)OakTree500 Wrote:  
(06-06-2017 08:52 AM)JDog554 Wrote:  You have to first get a permit where you can legally drive with someone who holds a license for a period of time before you are allowed to take a test to see if you are ready to have a license. As much as it is said, we do not just hand out licenses over here.
Here in the UK, you apply for a "provisional" license, which you can learn on (with the aforementioned adult/driving school involved). To pass onto a "full" driving license, there is a theory test, consisting of 40+ multiple choice questions and a hazard perception test, and THEN pass your practical driving test. The UK motor department (the DVLA) are on about making it harder as well.

You can also ride a motor bike of a certain size on a learners license as well, [once you pass a basic road safty exam, that then lasts for two years].

Yeah we have a test like that, you get a drivers handbook which you have to study, I don't think it's that big of a test though.

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06-06-2017, 10:25 AM
RE: Is Driving Hard?
(06-06-2017 05:44 AM)Peebothuhul Wrote:  At work.

(06-06-2017 05:34 AM)Gawdzilla Wrote:  I'm in the US, Missouri right now. Learned to drive in Indiana.

Manual transmissions are more work and doubtful benefit. I learned on an automatic and my first experience with a manual transmission was when the Y-donor bought a car with a "stick shift" and told me to get it home. Took me three hours. Tongue

Benifits of a manual/stick shift:

Able to 'Clutch' start the vehicle should the battery be flat and a hill available to 'Roll start'/turn the engine over.

Technically a manual uses less horse power. Since some engine power is used to work the gears for you in an automatic.

Some 'Purist' insist that they can work the manual transmission 'better' than the settings of an automatic.

Though, with todays much better electonic controls etc, such thoughts have probably fallen by the wayside

Just some minor points. Tongue

For a driving enthusiast, it is certainly much better to have a manual. You can keep the engine at the appropriate RPM range for optimal performance, and do things like downshift at the apex of a curve to properly accelerate out of it. Even my Jaguar and both my Infinitis with paddle shifters (clutchless shifter, basically) can't really mimic a true manual with clutch properly.

For day to day/commuter type driving, frankly it's more of a pain than anything else and the auto removes a lot of that stress.
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06-06-2017, 11:17 AM
RE: Is Driving Hard?
I must admit that I've always found it somewhat scary that parents get to teach their kids to drive in the US. But my views may be coloured, since it's illegal here.
I know from experience that anxiety makes driving not just hard, but dangerous. You simply can't focus and your reaction speed gets horrible. I've been in several hairy crashes thanks to that. I completely stopped driving thanks to this (and because of some meds I'm taking that makes driving illegal). It sounds like your dad is making you anxious and stressed, so that is no way to learn to drive! It's also hard to absorb new information when anxious or stressed. I'd say definitely, definitely get a driving instructor to teach you rather than your dad! Or find someone who makes you relax and able to focus.
Once you've learned in a proper manner, you won't find it difficult. However it does take practice and a good teacher. Learning in the environment your dad is providing is impossible and not safe, by the sound of it.
Be safe Smile

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06-06-2017, 11:29 AM
RE: Is Driving Hard?
(06-06-2017 11:17 AM)LadyDay Wrote:  I must admit that I've always found it somewhat scary that parents get to teach their kids to drive in the US.

I think it makes more sense. By the time my mom was teaching me she was already driving for like 30+ years. Plus you can trust them more to be more harsh and strict because they are putting their own kid in a potentially dangerous situation, and it's cheaper than paying for classes.

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06-06-2017, 12:02 PM
RE: Is Driving Hard?
(06-06-2017 10:25 AM)Stefan Mayerschoff Wrote:  
(06-06-2017 05:44 AM)Peebothuhul Wrote:  At work.


Benifits of a manual/stick shift:

Able to 'Clutch' start the vehicle should the battery be flat and a hill available to 'Roll start'/turn the engine over.

Technically a manual uses less horse power. Since some engine power is used to work the gears for you in an automatic.

Some 'Purist' insist that they can work the manual transmission 'better' than the settings of an automatic.

Though, with todays much better electonic controls etc, such thoughts have probably fallen by the wayside

Just some minor points. Tongue

For a driving enthusiast, it is certainly much better to have a manual. You can keep the engine at the appropriate RPM range for optimal performance, and do things like downshift at the apex of a curve to properly accelerate out of it. Even my Jaguar and both my Infinitis with paddle shifters (clutchless shifter, basically) can't really mimic a true manual with clutch properly.

For day to day/commuter type driving, frankly it's more of a pain than anything else and the auto removes a lot of that stress.

I've always preferred manuals, for the kinds of reasons you describe. I want to decide when to shift. I don't want the car deciding that for me. It has different priorities. I once heard it put this way: "Manual transmission is for people who want to drive a car. Automatic transmission is for people who want to ride in one."

As for driving being hard -- I found it hard to learn, but fairly easy once I got the hang of it. That took a while, though. I also think people tend to get complacent about how easy it is. It's not so easy that you can text or read or apply make-up while driving. You really do have to keep your full attention on driving. People need to keep in mind how dangerous a ton or two of metal in motion can be.
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06-06-2017, 01:51 PM
RE: Is Driving Hard?
(06-06-2017 05:03 AM)Ruby Crystal Wrote:  ---
I have to ask, is it hard to drive an automatic? He's telling me it's easier to drive that as you don't have to turned the wheel a full 360 to make turns. Is driving really that hard? And is there is a way I can build of confidence?
---

Pardon me but, uh ... your dad is an ignorant asshole. Dodgy no offence

Speaking as a professional driver, please advise your parent and possibly your grand parent that in my professional assessment, they are dangerous fucking morons, bent on distracting a driver and therefore endangering the lives of everyone on the road... possibly including me!

It had to said - I have a responsibility. Being a driver means safety first. And a confident driver is a safe driver. I want confident drivers on the roads where I drive. I'm glad to see you are an instinctively good driver - you already know that it takes confidence! Shy
***

Yes - go with an automatic vehicle. Thumbsup For any apprehensive driver, less is always best and there is less thinking about coordinating the feet with an automatic vehicle. There is less thinking about "operating" the vehicle, overall. In an automatic, driving is stripped down to what it is: steering. This is especially good for beginning drivers because the focus is directed to the most important thing: focus on the road. All you are doing is steering the vehicle along the road. And now, your one foot has only two functions to perform: stop and/or go.

Moving, steering, stopping <-- this is driving.

While driving: relax, keep the eyes scanning the areas in front and periodically, use the mirrors to briefly scan the rear & sides around the car. Looking front, chin up - try to place the focus of your eyes down the road several yards - basically, look where you want the car to be.
(when shooting a gun, you don't look at where the bullet comes out of the gun, you look at the thing you want to shoot - same principle)

If uncertain how to direct your steering on a highway, visualize an invisible horizon line slightly higher than the center of the windshield and generally have the eyes focus in that area. This is called "aiming high in steering" and it will magically keep the car centered in the lane for you. (I suspect many beginning drivers concentrate on what is right in front of the vehicle - this keeps the eyes down and far too close.)

Communicate with other drivers by properly using your turn indicators and flashers and yes, your horn.

A relaxed and comfortable driver is a safe and confident driver. Safety first - always. One must be relaxed yet, alert to be prepared - to expect the unexpected - to calmly react to any unexpected thing that might run in front of you ... or just avoid a giant pothole. Wink

If you are unsure of something on a highway, remain calm, maybe slow the speed a bit or even (with flashers on) pull to the side or a safe place to check it out. You are in control of your safety and everyone else on the road wants you to be safe.

You can do this. Thumbsup

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06-06-2017, 02:31 PM
RE: Is Driving Hard?
I think having lessons from a professional teacher rather than people you know makes a lot of difference. Being able to drive doesn't make you a good teacher.

I personally found driving hard to begin with, but it eventually became second nature. I've always driven manual, but automatic is generally easier. It's one less thing to think about. It also removes the risk of stalling, which is the bane of the beginner.

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07-06-2017, 02:32 AM
RE: Is Driving Hard?
(06-06-2017 11:29 AM)JDog554 Wrote:  
(06-06-2017 11:17 AM)LadyDay Wrote:  I must admit that I've always found it somewhat scary that parents get to teach their kids to drive in the US.

I think it makes more sense. By the time my mom was teaching me she was already driving for like 30+ years. Plus you can trust them more to be more harsh and strict because they are putting their own kid in a potentially dangerous situation, and it's cheaper than paying for classes.

I have several worries when it comes to parents, who lack the education and training it takes to be a professional instructor, teaching their kids. Firstly, where do they get the theory from? Over here we have theory classes along with the practical driving classes. There's a bunch of traffic laws. Another thing is that a professional driving instructor has the experience in what mistakes new drivers tend to make and where to focus. And they have teaching experience in general, meaning they can effectively communicate to the student.
A professional driving instructor also has the traffic rules fresh in mind and doesn't make the driving mistakes that the average driver makes. All "normal" drivers have developed bad habits and mistakes. F.ex. as a pedestrian you quickly learn not to trust that drivers stop for you at pedestrian crossings like they're supposed to.You'd get killed if you just assumed people remembered and followed the law.
Another thing is that when you learn to drive with a professional instructor, at least here, you do it in their car, which has a set of brakes build in for the instructor, so that (s)he can break if needed.
In reality being an experienced driver doesn't necessarily mean you're a good driver. And while I'm sure most parents can teach their kids reasonably good driving, I wouldn't trust the whole of parenthood with the responsibility of teaching it. As you can see from this thread, not all parents are capable of a teaching it, so not all parents should be trusted to do so. The student is not capable of judging for themselves if their parents are teaching them everything they're supposed to learn.
This is why I highly recommend that the thread starter get a professional instructor. She can't learn safe driving from this farther.

I do agree that it's a big advantage to the student that learning from mum and dad is free, while an instructor is expensive. They're expensive here too. And it is unfortunate if you aren't able to get a drivers license for financial reasons.
But safety comes first. It's a good lesson in learning how to save up for things you want. Or a good lesson in manipulating your parents to hand over money so that they don't have to drive you everywhere.
Until you've saved up for the instructor, there's always the wonders of the bike and public transport Smile That's healthy and environmentally friendly too Big Grin
But I might be biased because we don't really have proper poverty here and any normal teenager can find a job. So in the end, all of them can find the money to get the license.

Okay, that was a long post, sorry about that.

TL;DR The reasons why I think lessons by a professional instructor should be required to get a license.

"I believe that while not all people are essentially good, most are trying" - Adam Savage
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