Is Evolution Observable?
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03-02-2014, 11:15 AM
RE: Is Evolution Observable?
And the creationist says, . . . "....but it's still a fish." . . . . or "....but it is still a virus." They really get hung up on "the crockoduck" concept.
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03-02-2014, 11:20 AM
RE: Is Evolution Observable?
You tell me. Shy



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05-02-2014, 08:05 AM
RE: Is Evolution Observable?
I had already answered a similar question in another thread, so I am going to copy paste. The answer to your question is also in there:



Science doesn't mean that we have to duplicate a phenomenon that we describe in a theory. Once we formulate a theory, which is backed up by evidence (experiments, findings, calculations, etc). we can predict things based on that theory. If the predictions are wrong, there is a flaw in the theory, which necessitates further inquiries.

For instance: Electricity is a theory from physics, and as you can see we have been able to utilize electricity in our everyday life because we can predict the outcome when we build electrical devices.

Evolution also helps us to predict things.

Obviously, one is that bacteria (duplicating every 20-60 min under good conditions) develop resistance to antibiotics after exposure. To the best of my knowledge, we can not observe evolution with any other organism, which has a longer replication time, because it would take too long.

Breeding dogs, horses, cats or breeding plants is based on evolution as well. You cross individuals, in which you see a desired phenotype to obtain offspring with that phenotype. As an example: You might want to bread an especially sturdy horse. For that you select an individual horse, which is especially sturdy, cross him with multiple other horses, observe the offspring and continue crossing sturdy horses until this phenotype is maximized to your satisfaction. Or, you could make tomatoes which aren't squishy and slow rotting. Or wheat plants, which are more bountiful.

In the lab, our research is based on evolution, too. We are working to characterise the function and mechanism of important proteins that act in our body. It is very challenging, and sometimes we need to look for homologues in other organisms. Homologues are proteins from other organisms which are relatives to the proteins of the organism we are studying (homo sapiens). The homology is the degree to which they are similar. If you compare humans with other apes, you very often get homologies higher than 95%! If you compare humans with mice, that number doesn't fall much. But we often compare humans with more distant relatives in our search for proteins that are simpler and easier to work with, like yeast. When we compare human proteins with yeast proteins, we still often get 30-40% homology. And by comparing protein sequences from a lot of different organisms, I can even track how that protein has evolved over time!

There are definitely other examples, but I give you these for now.

Fun "paradox": The higher the selection pressure, the slower evolution takes place.
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05-02-2014, 08:11 AM
RE: Is Evolution Observable?
Mutation x reproduction= evolution
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05-02-2014, 08:35 AM
RE: Is Evolution Observable?
(01-02-2014 12:12 PM)ThePaleolithicFreethinker Wrote:  Thank you cantor i never even heard of evolutionary algorithms. This is very neat information and i shall do more homework on it.

In short, evolutionary algorithms take our understanding of Darwinian evolution and applies it practically to perform computational searches. This means that at the very least the theory of evolution is logically consistent otherwise we wouldn't be able to use it in practice.

Genetic algorithms have been used for a multitude of purposes, from optimising aircraft wings, producing designs for circuit boards for radios, evolving computer programs, controllers for artificially intelligent robots etc. These are just the examples off the top of my head. Essentially when you get down to it, it's just another way of performing a search of potential solutions using a computer.
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05-02-2014, 08:42 AM
RE: Is Evolution Observable?
It occurs every hour of every day in every hospital lab in the world. Bacteria evolve resistance to antibiotics, all the time, everywhere.
People who say it's "not observed" are poopy heads.

Insufferable know-it-all.Einstein God has a plan for us. Please stop screwing it up with your prayers.
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06-02-2014, 02:08 AM
RE: Is Evolution Observable?
I have someone arguing that microevolution is real but macroevolution isn't.

I was like, there's only one evolution, and it's all micro. Tiny changes over a long period of time. A looooooong period of time!
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06-02-2014, 08:38 AM
RE: Is Evolution Observable?
Why do you need a new flu shot every year?
The influenza virus mutates and "evolves" over the year . It evolves so your immune system can't identify it.
Also, If you see a trait in a species develop over a period of time, so if I said, "more people are taller than 2 meters than they were 20 years ago," that can be a trait that came from natural selection or "girls who like tall guys."
And remember, macro evolution is part of evolution.
So yes, evolution is observable.

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06-02-2014, 08:40 AM
RE: Is Evolution Observable?
Check here,and here.
(05-02-2014 08:35 AM)Mathilda Wrote:  
(01-02-2014 12:12 PM)ThePaleolithicFreethinker Wrote:  Thank you cantor i never even heard of evolutionary algorithms. This is very neat information and i shall do more homework on it.

In short, evolutionary algorithms take our understanding of Darwinian evolution and applies it practically to perform computational searches. This means that at the very least the theory of evolution is logically consistent otherwise we wouldn't be able to use it in practice.

Genetic algorithms have been used for a multitude of purposes, from optimising aircraft wings, producing designs for circuit boards for radios, evolving computer programs, controllers for artificially intelligent robots etc. These are just the examples off the top of my head. Essentially when you get down to it, it's just another way of performing a search of potential solutions using a computer.

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06-02-2014, 11:50 AM
RE: Is Evolution Observable?
Again, . . . it's why the creationist will come up with the "but it is STILL . . . a dog!" Or, . . "It's still a virus." Surely there is a link that shows credible examples of a lifeform that has characteristics found in "two different kinds". I am not at all well versed on this topic, but I read that there was an animal that had similarities to both canines and felines.
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