Is Evolution Observable?
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29-04-2017, 07:16 PM
RE: Is Evolution Observable?
(29-04-2017 06:48 AM)Bucky Ball Wrote:  Is Evolution Observable?
Yes, every minute in every hospital lab in the world.
http://www.sciencephoto.com/media/296977/view

You can also observe it in every delivery room too.
Every child born is a product of evolution.
Each child isn't an exact copy of either parent.
Those similarities & differences get passed down to the next generation.

Insanity - doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results
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30-04-2017, 01:55 PM
RE: Is Evolution Observable?
What a creatard means by asking is evolution observable is rather the question has there been the observation of an event of speciation, one species transforming into another. I guess what they usually mean by species is reproductive isolation. If that is the case, the likely answer is not only that it hasn't been observed, but that it likely will never be observed. The changes which accumulate to result in reproductive isolation are seen in hindsight. Most species transitions are ones of cumulative change, not of one mutative event giving rise to offspring that are reproductively isolated from their parents. So I suspect that what the creatard is doing in asking the question is asking a loaded question, which supposedly refutes evolution, and can never be answered in the affirmative. Perhaps the most appropriate response is not to dredge up examples where evolution has (supposedly) occurred--note the past tense--but rather to question the person as to what they actually mean by the question. If they indeed mean has there been an observation of reproductive isolation arising in one or a few generations, then perhaps the answer is to explain that evolution doesn't work that way.
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01-05-2017, 05:51 AM
RE: Is Evolution Observable?
(30-04-2017 01:55 PM)big green mouth Wrote:  What a creatard means by asking is evolution observable is rather the question has there been the observation of an event of speciation, one species transforming into another. I guess what they usually mean by species is reproductive isolation. If that is the case, the likely answer is not only that it hasn't been observed, but that it likely will never be observed. The changes which accumulate to result in reproductive isolation are seen in hindsight. Most species transitions are ones of cumulative change, not of one mutative event giving rise to offspring that are reproductively isolated from their parents. So I suspect that what the creatard is doing in asking the question is asking a loaded question, which supposedly refutes evolution, and can never be answered in the affirmative. Perhaps the most appropriate response is not to dredge up examples where evolution has (supposedly) occurred--note the past tense--but rather to question the person as to what they actually mean by the question. If they indeed mean has there been an observation of reproductive isolation arising in one or a few generations, then perhaps the answer is to explain that evolution doesn't work that way.

Yes you can observe speciation within several generations. Ring species are a great example.
You can find examples of this on YouTube.

The Ensatina's of northern California is a good example.

http://evolution.berkeley.edu/evolibrary.../devitt_02

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01-05-2017, 11:21 AM
RE: Is Evolution Observable?
I had forgotten about ring species. Whenever I ask creationists about ring species, they tend to get very quiet. Anyway, I was poking around looking for the creationist explanation of ring species (no doubt having something to do with the Fall), and I found this:

https://whyevolutionistrue.wordpress.com...g-species/

"A while back, when I said in the comments of an evolution post that there were no good “ring species,” a few readers asked me what I meant by that. “What about the salamander Ensatina eschscholtzii? Or seagulls in the genus Larus? Aren’t those good ring species?” My answer was that those had been shown not to be ring species in the classic sense, but there was still one species that might be a candidate: the greenish warbler Phylloscopus trochiloides around the Tibetan Plateau.

"But now that one, too, has been struck off the list of ring species, leaving no good cases. Its removal from the class is documented in a new paper by Miguel Alcaide et al. in Nature (reference and link below), in a group headed by Darren Irwin, a professor at the University of British Columbia and including my next-door Chicago colleague Trevor Price."
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