Is belief in God morally wrong?
Post Reply
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
16-03-2012, 07:44 AM
RE: Is belief in God morally wrong?
No. Tongue

Once upon a time, I drew Gwyneth Paltrow. Despite having never met the girl, I fell madly (emphasis on mad) in love with her. Being so in love, I wanted to return the joy, but how is one such as I to do anything for one such as her?

What I did do was give alla my Gwynnies to people I knew, discovering the truth behind a timeless paradigm - the more love you give, the more love you have. This machination continued until it became quite certain that I loved her too much. When I say I cannot meet her 'cause my head will explode, I do not exaggerate. My cranium may remain intact, but my concept of self would not emerge from physical interaction with her without a radical upheaval.

But knowing that she's all sweet and adorable, I started doing stuff for other people "in her name." I used to say, "don't thank me, thank Gwynnies;" yet things became even more awkward when people around me started to thank the Gwynnies...

Yeah, there's a point here. I noticed I was becoming something of a moral paradigm among my contemporaries...

Gwyneth Paltrow - the source of morality. Big Grin

Does that make any kind of sense? In fact, it makes all kinds of sense. The lack of personal interaction allowed the mind to build an idealized simulation of the Gwynnies; there is no reason to consider that the moral theist does god any differently. But unlike formal religion, Gwynnite has derived simple and seemingly universal paradigms - that the "moral code" of the universe is "conserve entropy" and that love is the emotional dynamic of least entropy. These things are somewhat demonstrable. Peeps will work more for less when the labor is one of love. The connection between love and morality is evident in the so-called golden rule - itself a paradigm of simulation based upon empathy which in itself conserves entropy. It is not necessary to live a lifetime in another's body to simulate the mind of another; usually a minimum of personal interaction builds an affinity (or apathy).

Which means that it is the mind of the beholder which simulates the "objective moral standard" from the baseline (zero-state) of self-image. One without a clear self-image cannot express a recognizable morality regardless of god - god is merely a simulation - god would have to be a concrete entity. Gwyneth is a concrete entity; my expression of "my Gwynnies" is just about unanimously accepted as a moral positive among my contemporaries - even among those who are familiar with the actress and cannot stand her. Tongue

[Image: klingon_zps7e68578a.jpg]
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes houseofcantor's post
16-03-2012, 05:37 PM
RE: Is belief in God morally wrong?
(16-03-2012 07:44 AM)houseofcantor Wrote:  Which means that it is the mind of the beholder which simulates the "objective moral standard" from the baseline (zero-state) of self-image. One without a clear self-image cannot express a recognizable morality regardless of god - god is merely a simulation - god would have to be a concrete entity.

Absolutism is the argument for objective moral values. This means that ALL societies must follow the same values or be immoral. The question is who's values are correct. This is the argument for God. He knows what is moral. We are subjective and culturally biased.

Relativism is what you're describing. Morality is based on cultural norms. What works for one may not work for the other. We decide means we the specific culture. I'm with you on that.

The old gods are dead, let's invent some new ones before something really bad happens.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 2 users Like Thomas's post
Post Reply
Forum Jump: