Is faith an irrational concept outside the realm of religion?
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17-05-2012, 11:58 PM
Is faith an irrational concept outside the realm of religion?
Clearly, within the context of religion, faith is the antithesis of rational thought. It is believing with certainty that which has no evidence, based purely on emotion and feeling. Following that line of reasoning, we should also be certain that aliens, santa, and the tooth fairy all exist, because if they didn't I would be sad. Also, one day soon, a man will pull up to me driving a Lamborghini filled with money and toss me the keys. I feel it to be the truth deep in my heart.

But outside the cognitive madness that is religion, faith is held in high regard by even the secular. Faith in humanity. Faith that things will get better. Faith that noble ideals will prevail over malevolent acts. They tell those struggling or facing hardship to keep the faith as a way of extending their sympathy. But I believe that these are all misuses of the word. Faith in these instances is being used as a synonym for hope or trust. Which is perfectly reasonable. You absolutely should keep hope in your fellow man to do the right thing or trust that you will prevail against the terrorist.

Regardless of context, faith is still "a belief that is not based on proof," which goes against any honest intent for progressive thinking. The process itself of "having faith" is a hindrance to the collective well-being of mankind. It has survived in our vocabulary by disguising itself as more noble terms.

"Ain't got no last words to say, yellow streak right up my spine. The gun in my mouth was real and the taste blew my mind."

"We see you cry. We turn your head. Then we slap your face. We see you try. We see you fail. Some things never change."
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18-05-2012, 12:22 AM
 
RE: Is faith an irrational concept outside the realm of religion?
You are describing religious faith, but not faith as Jesus talked about it when he was performing miracles. Keep in mind, Jesus never taught us how to have faith; he just chided us (or maybe was simply informing us) that we don’t have any faith. Because if we had faith, the way he had faith, we could tell a mountain to be cast into the sea and it would be. We could raise the dead. We could walk on water.

There’s a reason these ludicrous capabilities are used in the Gospel. There’s something he’s trying to tell us. So, I thought about it. The only place I know where his teachings on faith actually work is in a lucid dream. If you haven’t had one, it is a dream where you are aware that you are dreaming while you’re in the dream. I have had many of them, some lasting quite a while.

In a lucid dream, faith is what makes shit happen. You want to walk through a wall, just have a little confidence and start pressing up against that wall. You want to make love to a babe, just start believing she’s behind the next door you open, and there she is. Did you lose a pet? Do you want that pet back? Just believe and he or she will come running around the corner looking for you.

So, maybe we have the Gospels wrong: What if they’re an instruction manual for how to run your lucid spiritual plane after you die? What if they have nothing to do with this life whatsoever?

All I'm saying is maybe we need to start thinking outside the box. It is 2012, after all. Consider
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18-05-2012, 12:32 AM
RE: Is faith an irrational concept outside the realm of religion?
This could easily delve into philosophy. Some degree of faith is required before you can even use language and have a foundation for thought.




“Forget Jesus, the stars died so you could be born.” - Lawrence M. Krauss
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18-05-2012, 01:27 AM
RE: Is faith an irrational concept outside the realm of religion?
Not saying this a thread-ender, but if it is, let me know. But isn't faith required when a person goes into surgery? Often at the time you're so drugged up you will never be able to pick them out of the crowd. If I didn't have the hiccups right now that are driving me crazy, I would probably better help at the find more common ground between the wise and the wacky Jesus factions.

Wow...my eyes are blurry and I'm stumbling over my own words. Better call it quits and come laugh at this tomorrow.

It was just a fucking apple man, we're sorry okay? Please stop the madness Laugh out load
~Izel
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18-05-2012, 02:06 AM
RE: Is faith an irrational concept outside the realm of religion?
(17-05-2012 11:58 PM)Buddy Christ Wrote:  Regardless of context, faith is still "a belief that is not based on proof," which goes against any honest intent for progressive thinking.

My internet seems to think "faith" is derivate of the Latin word for "trust." My experience tells me "trust" is based upon anecdotal evidence. Most atheists disregard anecdotal evidence as proof, yet let's have a show of hands: anybody surprised that Egor somehow associated this with the Gospels and after-death mysticism?

Can anybody guess what I'm gonna associate this with? That's right - I love my Gwynnies!

I put that in italics, cause every time I write it, I say it out loud as like one word; with this happy-bouncy inflection - cause I'm a total fucking idiot - and you can trust that I ain't gonna be thinking in paragraphs without my stupid obsession inserting itself into the context of the composition somehow. Cause it's viral and shit.

If atheism is just a "lack of belief," then wtf is with this dogmatic attack on the concept of faith?

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18-05-2012, 02:37 AM
RE: Is faith an irrational concept outside the realm of religion?
(18-05-2012 12:22 AM)Egor Wrote:  You are describing religious faith, but not faith as Jesus talked about it when he was performing miracles. Keep in mind, Jesus never taught us how to have faith; he just chided us (or maybe was simply informing us) that we don’t have any faith.

That's because Jesus believed there'd be no need for faith. He believed the Rapture would happen before his followers were dead (Matthew 24:34). He didn't think 2000 years later, his followers would have to base their entire belief system on a poorly edited and mistranslated collection of arbitrary texts about witches and dragons.



(18-05-2012 02:06 AM)houseofcantor Wrote:  
(17-05-2012 11:58 PM)Buddy Christ Wrote:  Regardless of context, faith is still "a belief that is not based on proof," which goes against any honest intent for progressive thinking.

My internet seems to think "faith" is derivate of the Latin word for "trust." My experience tells me "trust" is based upon anecdotal evidence. Most atheists disregard anecdotal evidence as proof, yet let's have a show of hands: anybody surprised that Egor somehow associated this with the Gospels and after-death mysticism?

Well according to my internet (Conservapedia), "faith" is described as:

"Faith embodies more than belief. Faith elevates one's being, while belief is limited to a mental state or emotion. Faith implies a causal role by the believer in an outcome[2] or in overcoming a personal fear. Faith also implies advancement or accomplishment rather than wrongdoing, while belief implies neither.

Liberals and non-believers in general (see Atheism) will often try to use common descriptions of faith against faith in God the Lord. Dictionaries and other blasphemous publications, almost always with a strong liberal bias, describe faith as the blind belief in something for which there is no evidence. This, however, is wrong. Faith can also describe the true, benevolent belief in our Lord God, for which there are literally oceans of evidence, but mainstream publications simply won't admit that, probably due to satanic deceit. One should mind, however, that the true, transcedental definition of faith is *completely* different from any other, as Christianity is superior to any other form of belief."



This is, of course, right wing extremism to the point of hilarity, but it still demonstrates that the use of the word faith has transcended simply "trusting" and is more commonly used to describe "clinging to beliefs in the face of logic."

"Ain't got no last words to say, yellow streak right up my spine. The gun in my mouth was real and the taste blew my mind."

"We see you cry. We turn your head. Then we slap your face. We see you try. We see you fail. Some things never change."
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18-05-2012, 03:03 AM
RE: Is faith an irrational concept outside the realm of religion?
Conservapedia? I was just searching youtube for Einstein's field equations only to encounter pages of Haramein, but did I post that shit? No. Conclusion: you're a troll. Big Grin

"Faith" is a "my Gwynnies" kinda consideration, so you ain't gonna get any kind of objectivity from this source. More like thinking of throwing my cat at you... I kan say I have faith (see what I did there?Big Grin ) that the conceptualization behind the syntax represents an integral component of the human condition - something you ain't gonna get rid of, in other words. Wink

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18-05-2012, 04:24 AM
RE: Is faith an irrational concept outside the realm of religion?
Faith is trust…… being single-minded.

Interestingly…..

Wikipedia “Single-minded” …it will redirect to “Critical thinking” : )

Critical thinking
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
(Redirected from Single-minded)


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Single-minded
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