Is fundamentalism a mental disorder?
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25-03-2013, 12:24 PM (This post was last modified: 25-03-2013 12:28 PM by kim.)
RE: Is fundamentalism a mental disorder?
Yes, also from the article:
They argue that some individuals in the religious minority, or those who struggle with their beliefs, experience higher levels of stress. This causes a release of stress hormones that are known to depress the volume of the hippocampus over time. This might also explain the fact that both non-religious as well as some religious individuals have smaller hippocampal volumes.

A life long atheist, the only thing in my own life I might compare it to was my marriage, which I see now as an odd mixture of reinforced wishful thinking and downright, bought into illusion. Both the experiences of my marriage and those of religious folk might be seen as lived realities but the destruction of that conceptual mind frame most certainly takes it's toll. The stress factor in both situations (the religious/my marriage) seems on one hand quite real yet extremely irrational to me; struggling through or for something that is simply not a reality rather, a conceptual construct.

Have to wonder about that. Is the thing that makes people so desperately cling to religion, possibly the very thing that causes it to be rejected; the realization of it being a conceptual construct? Living the dream ... as they say.

This would be where my compassion and empathy for the theist mind set lies; I relate it to my own struggle with my marriage and subsequent divorce.

So... the original question; is fundamentalism a mental disorder? Consider I'm gonna go with calling it ... a temporary insanity. And I'm gonna hope for rehabilitation. Wink

A new type of thinking is essential if mankind is to survive and move to higher levels. ~ Albert Einstein
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25-03-2013, 12:28 PM
RE: Is fundamentalism a mental disorder?
(25-03-2013 10:32 AM)houseofcantor Wrote:  
(25-03-2013 10:21 AM)Impulse Wrote:  No.

With all due respect, I'm not sure if this was intended to be tongue-in-cheek or serious, but since it seems serious, I'm going to answer as such. I think calling fundamentalism or any other religious persuasion a mental disorder does more to harm atheists than anything else it might do. I believe we serve our cause much better by respecting believers as much as possible while simply pointing out the logical fallacies and evidence to the contrary. There are plenty of intelligent, mentally healthy people who are believers, including some fundamentalists. And, just as we don't like to be disrespected, neither do they.
No.
No, what?

"Religion has caused more misery to all of mankind in every stage of human history than any other single idea." --Madalyn Murray O'Hair
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25-03-2013, 12:37 PM
RE: Is fundamentalism a mental disorder?
(25-03-2013 12:24 PM)kim Wrote:  Yes, also from the article:
They argue that some individuals in the religious minority, or those who struggle with their beliefs, experience higher levels of stress. This causes a release of stress hormones that are known to depress the volume of the hippocampus over time. This might also explain the fact that both non-religious as well as some religious individuals have smaller hippocampal volumes.

A life long atheist, the only thing in my own life I might compare it to was my marriage, which I see now as an odd mixture of reinforced wishful thinking and downright, bought into illusion. Both the experiences of my marriage and those of religious folk might be seen as lived realities but the destruction of that conceptual mind frame most certainly takes it's toll. The stress factor in both situations (the religious/my marriage) seems on one hand quite real yet extremely irrational to me; struggling through or for something that is simply not a reality rather, a conceptual construct.

Have to wonder about that. Is the thing that makes people so desperately cling to religion, possibly the very thing that causes it to be rejected; the realization of it being a conceptual construct? Living the dream ... as they say.

This would be where my compassion and empathy for the theist mind set lies; I relate it to my own struggle with my marriage and subsequent divorce.

So... the original question; is fundamentalism a mental disorder? Consider I'm gonna go with calling it ... a temporary insanity. And I'm gonna hope for rehabilitation. Wink
You would be a fascinating and informative subject for a brain scan, given your lifetime of non belief. If the stress in your marriage occurred before twenty five, there's a good chance that the same atrophy could be present, although I can't help but think it would be less so than that in the brain of someone who suffered through religious indoctrination as a child. Of course, we'd have to control for childhood experience, which is one thing that often gets little consideration.

The beginning of wisdom is to call things by their right names. - Chinese Proverb
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25-03-2013, 01:12 PM
RE: Is fundamentalism a mental disorder?
Impulse is 100% right.

Either you champion science and evidence or you do not. There is no in between. If you make statements, inflamatory or otherwise, about the nature of religion or the religious that is NOT based on concrete science, then you are no better than any fly by night charlatan. To do it in the name of science is an even greater crime.

Psychiatry and psychology are scientific disciplines, not the tool of people looking to score cheap points. These disciplines have had to fight for over 100 years to smash the stigma of mental illness and bring the conversation to a rational level and when people throw around the stigma of mental health to demonise people they don't like, quite frankly if fucking angers me.

It's some dark side of the Force bullshit. Quicker, more seductive. But not stronger.

Hey, Kim.

I'm sorry, but that study has been trotted out before. It in no way provides a link between religion, fundamentalism and mental health disorder. Not at all.

Peace and Love and Empathy,

Matt
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25-03-2013, 01:26 PM
RE: Is fundamentalism a mental disorder?
(25-03-2013 09:33 AM)DeathsNotoriousAngel Wrote:  While searching around I came across a couple of interesting articles that describe the symptoms of mental disorders. While reading the symptoms list a couple of these list symptoms that almost mimic the mindset of a fundamentalist. I have provided the links to these articles so that everyone can decide for themselves. Is fundamentalism a mental disorder?


http://www.psychcentral.com/disorders/sx11.htm

http://www.psychcentral.com/disorders/sx33.htm

Some people on the forum remind me of fundamentalists. If there is some mental disorder, it isn't exclusive to fundamentalist.
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25-03-2013, 01:51 PM
RE: Is fundamentalism a mental disorder?
Fundamentalism is NOT a mental disorder.
Yes, it is, precious.
No, it's not. The stress mentioned comes from people's abject stubborn nature in rejecting everything moral, decent and lovely, including the Word of God.
Yes, it is a mental disease or defect, Gollum!
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25-03-2013, 01:53 PM (This post was last modified: 04-04-2013 06:18 PM by Doctor X.)
RE: Is fundamentalism a mental disorder?
******

Those who administer and moderate in order to exercise personal agenda merely feed into the negative stereotype of Atheism
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25-03-2013, 01:55 PM
RE: Is fundamentalism a mental disorder?
No. Case in point: Dusty Smith.

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25-03-2013, 02:14 PM
RE: Is fundamentalism a mental disorder?
(25-03-2013 12:37 PM)bbeljefe Wrote:  You would be a fascinating and informative subject for a brain scan, given your lifetime of non belief. If the stress in your marriage occurred before twenty five, there's a good chance that the same atrophy could be present, although I can't help but think it would be less so than that in the brain of someone who suffered through religious indoctrination as a child. Of course, we'd have to control for childhood experience, which is one thing that often gets little consideration.

You know, now that you throw the notion of "childhood experience" into the mix ... there was always something in the back of my mind that told me something was wrong with my situation, but still, I went along with it because "that's what people do". I can almost pinpoint a moment where I decided to "stick with it" even when presented with an easy out. I wonder if that moment might be characterized as a "split" and maybe my marriage was a fugue state? Consider Hmm.

Yep, I'm going with temporary insanity worsened by encouragement from the unruly mob(relatives, friends, paparazzi). Thumbsup

Oh, and uh... thanks for telling me quite politely that I should have my head examined... I've often thought that very thing. Wink

A new type of thinking is essential if mankind is to survive and move to higher levels. ~ Albert Einstein
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25-03-2013, 03:04 PM
RE: Is fundamentalism a mental disorder?
(25-03-2013 02:14 PM)kim Wrote:  You know, now that you throw the notion of "childhood experience" into the mix ... there was always something in the back of my mind that told me something was wrong with my situation, but still, I went along with it because "that's what people do". I can almost pinpoint a moment where I decided to "stick with it" even when presented with an easy out. I wonder if that moment might be characterized as a "split" and maybe my marriage was a fugue state? Consider Hmm.

Yep, I'm going with temporary insanity worsened by encouragement from the unruly mob(relatives, friends, paparazzi). Thumbsup

Oh, and uh... thanks for telling me quite politely that I should have my head examined... I've often thought that very thing. Wink
People who remain in dysfunctional relationships are almost always restaging early trauma(s), as are people who repeatedly seek dysfunctional relationships. So in your case, if you've identified the problems with your marriage as being something you are prone to and have since avoided men like your ex then yes, it was probably temporary. However, if you've continued to gravitate toward assholes, it's just plain dissociation. Unsure

The beginning of wisdom is to call things by their right names. - Chinese Proverb
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