Is it immoral to allow the elderly to live?
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07-05-2012, 08:17 AM
RE: Is it immoral to allow old people live?
(02-05-2012 06:29 PM)mysticjbyrd Wrote:  
(02-05-2012 05:52 PM)Mr Woof Wrote:  Well lets start with your family members 70 and over; as for the dysfunctional, I suggest you head the queue
I would be fine with that if the law was enacted.

I can look past my own selfish desires, and see that its for the better.



Selfish desires?
You're agreeing with killing at least 2-3 billion people because you somehow assume it will save the human race.
I would agree with limiting the amount of children one has,but killing the disabled,the elderly or enforcing abortion and sterilization is disgusting and a violation of human rights.

The meaning of peace is the absence of opposition to socialism.
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07-05-2012, 08:31 AM
RE: Is it immoral to allow the elderly to live?
(03-05-2012 07:15 PM)Antirepublican Wrote:  
(03-05-2012 06:46 PM)Mr Woof Wrote:  OOOOHHH Marge we all gotta die to save mankind! Ohmy
You don't have to die, just stop having kids.

Child limit laws work.
China's population is about to skyrocket DOWN over the next few decades.
And large cities in China are overpopulating with males. Because of child limit laws when many people find out they are having a girl they get an abortion. They want boys to carry on the name.

Quote:In 1979, China implemented a highly intrusive policy to limit the number of births per family. Government workers monitor families for birth control use and tell couples when they are authorized to conceive. Couples are pressured to terminate “unauthorized” pregnancies, and this has occurred even in the eighth or ninth month of pregnancy (U.S. Department of State, 1997). The policy was implemented because of the enormous size of the Chinese population. The government predicted that it would be unable to meet its needs (Potter, 1987). The policy is more likely to be enforced in cities than out in the countryside, where families may be allowed to have more than one child because they need extra help on the farm (Potter, 1987).The government’s policy, however, runs counter to the family traditions of the Chinese people. In Chinese society, sons are the means of continuity, prosperity, and the only valid source of care and support. The happiness of the aging relatives is thought to be secure when there are many sons who can help, thus the village expression: “the more sons, the more happiness.” If a couple has only one child, and she is a girl, there will be no one to care for the parents as they age. It is a cause of great shame when aging parents must rely on the government for sustenance, and the amount provided by the government guarantees that the parents will end their days in poverty (Potter, 1987).As you can see, there is cultural incentive to have more than one child. To counter this, the government provides steep penalties to families who have “unauthorized pregnancies.” These include psychological coercion, loss of employment, heavy fines (up to twice annual earnings) and confiscation of property. The Government does not authorize the use of force to compel persons to submit to abortion or sterilization, but officials acknowledge that this does occur (U.S. Department of State, 1997).Interestingly, the new Maternal and Child Health Care Law forbids the use of ultrasound to detect the sex of a fetus. Moreover, regulations forbid sex-selectiveabortions, even promising punishment of medical practitioners who violate this provision. However, population statistics at least suggest that these practices continue nonetheless. The Chinese press has reported that the national ratio of male to female births is 114 to 100. One October 1994 survey of births in rural areas put the ratio as high as 117 male births to 100 female. However, these official statistics may actually underestimate the problem in that they may exclude many female births, especially the second or third in a family. Such births are unreported so that the parents can keep trying to conceive a boy (U.S. Department of State, 1997).In some press accounts, the ratio is even higher. The London Telegraph reports that the sex ratio of China's population is 131:100 in favor of males. In Zhejiang province there were 860,000 unmarried males aged 22 and above, but only 360,000 unmarried females of the same age group. Among 20- to 25-year olds, the sex ratio was 167:100 in a rural county in Henan province. In a population of 25 million babies born in China each year, there were 750,000 more males than females (Hutchings, 1997).Since China is a closed society, it is difficult to obtain accurate statistics. India, on the other hand, is more open and may provide a more candid view of female infanticide.


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07-05-2012, 10:07 AM (This post was last modified: 07-05-2012 10:13 AM by Antirepublican.)
RE: Is it immoral to allow the elderly to live?
(07-05-2012 08:31 AM)germanyt Wrote:  
(03-05-2012 07:15 PM)Antirepublican Wrote:  You don't have to die, just stop having kids.

Child limit laws work.
China's population is about to skyrocket DOWN over the next few decades.
And large cities in China are overpopulating with males. Because of child limit laws when many people find out they are having a girl they get an abortion. They want boys to carry on the name.

Quote:In 1979, China implemented a highly intrusive policy to limit the number of births per family. Government workers monitor families for birth control use and tell couples when they are authorized to conceive. Couples are pressured to terminate “unauthorized” pregnancies, and this has occurred even in the eighth or ninth month of pregnancy (U.S. Department of State, 1997). The policy was implemented because of the enormous size of the Chinese population. The government predicted that it would be unable to meet its needs (Potter, 1987). The policy is more likely to be enforced in cities than out in the countryside, where families may be allowed to have more than one child because they need extra help on the farm (Potter, 1987).The government’s policy, however, runs counter to the family traditions of the Chinese people. In Chinese society, sons are the means of continuity, prosperity, and the only valid source of care and support. The happiness of the aging relatives is thought to be secure when there are many sons who can help, thus the village expression: “the more sons, the more happiness.” If a couple has only one child, and she is a girl, there will be no one to care for the parents as they age. It is a cause of great shame when aging parents must rely on the government for sustenance, and the amount provided by the government guarantees that the parents will end their days in poverty (Potter, 1987).As you can see, there is cultural incentive to have more than one child. To counter this, the government provides steep penalties to families who have “unauthorized pregnancies.” These include psychological coercion, loss of employment, heavy fines (up to twice annual earnings) and confiscation of property. The Government does not authorize the use of force to compel persons to submit to abortion or sterilization, but officials acknowledge that this does occur (U.S. Department of State, 1997).Interestingly, the new Maternal and Child Health Care Law forbids the use of ultrasound to detect the sex of a fetus. Moreover, regulations forbid sex-selectiveabortions, even promising punishment of medical practitioners who violate this provision. However, population statistics at least suggest that these practices continue nonetheless. The Chinese press has reported that the national ratio of male to female births is 114 to 100. One October 1994 survey of births in rural areas put the ratio as high as 117 male births to 100 female. However, these official statistics may actually underestimate the problem in that they may exclude many female births, especially the second or third in a family. Such births are unreported so that the parents can keep trying to conceive a boy (U.S. Department of State, 1997).In some press accounts, the ratio is even higher. The London Telegraph reports that the sex ratio of China's population is 131:100 in favor of males. In Zhejiang province there were 860,000 unmarried males aged 22 and above, but only 360,000 unmarried females of the same age group. Among 20- to 25-year olds, the sex ratio was 167:100 in a rural county in Henan province. In a population of 25 million babies born in China each year, there were 750,000 more males than females (Hutchings, 1997).Since China is a closed society, it is difficult to obtain accurate statistics. India, on the other hand, is more open and may provide a more candid view of female infanticide.


Great plan. Thumbsup
Yah, that is true, but that is due to chinese culture, and it's also not really a bad thing. That too will drastically lower the chinese population.



(07-05-2012 08:17 AM)znk666 Wrote:  
(02-05-2012 06:29 PM)mysticjbyrd Wrote:  I would be fine with that if the law was enacted.

I can look past my own selfish desires, and see that its for the better.



Selfish desires?
You're agreeing with killing at least 2-3 billion people because you somehow assume it will save the human race.
I would agree with limiting the amount of children one has,but killing the disabled,the elderly or enforcing abortion and sterilization is disgusting and a violation of human rights.
According to the OP, so is their existence.

Which is sort of the point. Which is the greater violation of human rights?
If people would stop taking it personally, they would easily see that.
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