Is there a doctor in the house? How to treat cuts.
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25-04-2013, 04:05 AM
RE: Is there a doctor in the house? How to treat cuts.
Seriously though you should talk to your doctor.

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25-04-2013, 04:11 AM (This post was last modified: 25-04-2013 04:37 AM by Heathen.)
RE: Is there a doctor in the house? How to treat cuts.
When It happened...

-Clean the wound gently with anti-bacterial soap and rinse with clean water.
-Rinse again and when completed rinse a little longer.
-Seriously, 10 minutes or more.

Now...

-Leave the fucking thing alone.
-Leave it open to the air when possible.
-Cover it with sterile bandaging if you are going out somewhere or
doing something where there could be a risk of infection or it needs to be protected.
-Keep it clean.
-A small amount of antibiotic ointment like Polysporin can be applied but go easy.
-Seek professional medical attention if there is evidence of infection.

Stitches need to be done within hours. At this point, assuming that you are not crazy and there is exposed bone, you are likely in one of those situations where you could have used a stitch or two but it's probably to late now. I've been there. Several times. Watch for infection! That's nothing to mess around with.

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25-04-2013, 05:38 AM
RE: Is there a doctor in the house? How to treat cuts.
(24-04-2013 09:29 PM)Free Thought Wrote:  
(24-04-2013 07:56 PM)Dark Light Wrote:  (You can skip this bit) How I hurt myself:

About a week ago I was in Home Depot picking up a Trimmer (also known as a brand name, Weed Eater). I grabbed the box off the shelf and slid it toward the floor, and in doing so I caught my thumb on an industrial staple which ripped it open pretty good. It slowly oozed dark red blood but I was able to check out and get home without notice. A decent amount of blood had oozed out, but nothing serous. I cleaned it up, and over a 2 day period it had started to heal. 2 days afterward I found an old rusty axe head worthy of saving so I got a good handle and started to clean it up and sharpen it. As I was finishing up the bit on the last side my hand slipped and just so happened to go right into my cut, making it a pretty nasty cut. Blood poured out....a lot of blood. The cut (along with both on my hands) was covered in dirt, rust, and oil. I called over my mother-in-law, a nurse, to take a look to see if she though it needed stitches, and she said she thought it would be okay without stitches.

How to treat?:

I was advised my my mother-in-law to soak it in Hydrogen Peroxide regularly, so I did for a couple of days, but it got infected. I read up and some docs are saying that soaking it in H. Peroxide stops the healing process, and to not do it. Then I took my cat to the get who also had an infected wound. The vet advised (in addition to treatment) advised to soak his wound in Epsom Salts and warm water twice daily, so I thought "Hey, I should probably do that too." I did, and it seemed to help and is healing nicely now. After looking it up some docs are advising against the later practice, some are saying it's a good idea, now I have no idea what I'm supposed to do for future cuts like this. I don't know the science behind either of these, and my only medical training is as basically a first responder in the military...treat wounds till I can get 'em to a proper doc. Can someone clear up the confusion on this? What SHOULD you do to treat semi-serious cuts? Oh, uh, PS...What's the deal with bandages, leave on all the time? Let it air out? Half the day?

Just so no one is worried, I am not a complete idiot. I washed the wound the best I could immediately after I cut myself, I wash my hands several times a day, change my bandages about 3 or 4 times a day and use a topical antibacterial. My tetanus shots are up to date. Thumbsup

Irrigate the wound, preferably with some saline solution, but running tap water will suffice so long as it is clean, after it has been irrigated, dress the wound. You shouldn't really need to change the bandage (which I assume is little more than a bandaid, considering your stated thumb wound, please correct me if I am incorrect in this assumption) if the bleeding has slowed down or halted, if you can see the dressing (which comes adhered to adhesive bandage strips) and it is covered in blood, than it is decent idea to change it. but it is possible that frequently changing will slow the scabbing process by taking some of solidifying blood with it. I am unsure if airing wounds actually has any positive effects, I personally avoid airing out cuts, it opens a slightly greater possibility for the cut to be damaged further and completely reopened.

As an after-thought; Why would anybody say to soak an open cut in Hydrogen Peroxide? Last I heard Hydrogen peroxide is toxic to the human body...

Air = scab
No air = wet healing.

Wet healing is much faster but it encourages bacteria to grow.

If you dry heal - air to the wound - the dressing does not have to be changed because you have a scab covering the wound.

If you wet heal, it needs to be changed religiously and disinfected with antibiotic cream each time.

Whether you want to wet or dry heal depends on the size of the wound.

You want to get the wound down to a small area that can easily scab without the scab falling off all the time. For that you need wet healing.

The last bit can be left to scab - dry healing.

I am positive that this is right and the latest medical knowledge. None of the pros I consulted about this ( 2 surgeons, 4 nurses and two general practitioner docs) differed in their recommendation.

And then I saw a humongous wound heal based on this. So I am quite positive this is the way to go.

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25-04-2013, 07:19 AM
RE: Is there a doctor in the house? How to treat cuts.
(25-04-2013 05:38 AM)Dom Wrote:  
(24-04-2013 09:29 PM)Free Thought Wrote:  Irrigate the wound, preferably with some saline solution, but running tap water will suffice so long as it is clean, after it has been irrigated, dress the wound. You shouldn't really need to change the bandage (which I assume is little more than a bandaid, considering your stated thumb wound, please correct me if I am incorrect in this assumption) if the bleeding has slowed down or halted, if you can see the dressing (which comes adhered to adhesive bandage strips) and it is covered in blood, than it is decent idea to change it. but it is possible that frequently changing will slow the scabbing process by taking some of solidifying blood with it. I am unsure if airing wounds actually has any positive effects, I personally avoid airing out cuts, it opens a slightly greater possibility for the cut to be damaged further and completely reopened.

As an after-thought; Why would anybody say to soak an open cut in Hydrogen Peroxide? Last I heard Hydrogen peroxide is toxic to the human body...

Air = scab
No air = wet healing.

Wet healing is much faster but it encourages bacteria to grow.

If you dry heal - air to the wound - the dressing does not have to be changed because you have a scab covering the wound.

If you wet heal, it needs to be changed religiously and disinfected with antibiotic cream each time.

Whether you want to wet or dry heal depends on the size of the wound.

You want to get the wound down to a small area that can easily scab without the scab falling off all the time. For that you need wet healing.

The last bit can be left to scab - dry healing.

I am positive that this is right and the latest medical knowledge. None of the pros I consulted about this ( 2 surgeons, 4 nurses and two general practitioner docs) differed in their recommendation.

And then I saw a humongous wound heal based on this. So I am quite positive this is the way to go.

I stand corrected, my apologies.

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25-04-2013, 09:30 AM
RE: Is there a doctor in the house? How to treat cuts.
Dom is 100% correct, so no need for me to get into that.

On the subject of H2O2 (hydrogen peroxide), it is only useful in emergency situations where no irrigation fluid (clean water) is available. Peroxide kills living cells. So when it is applied to a wound, both the bacteria present as well as living human tissue, is killed. This is acceptable only if the loss of human tissue is balanced by removing infectious bacteria that cannot be removed otherwise.

In short, you should pretty much never use peroxide. If you have peroxide available, you are likely in a situation that also provides clean water.

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25-04-2013, 02:09 PM
RE: Is there a doctor in the house? How to treat cuts.
I would still reccomend going to a free clinic if one is available to you to get that cut checked. Depending on the depth of the laceration. But everyone else here has pretty much covered what you need to do.

Stay away from peroxide unless you don't possess another solution to cleanse your wound with. Keep your dressing fresh.
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25-04-2013, 03:22 PM
RE: Is there a doctor in the house? How to treat cuts.
I have insurance and a doctor, I just hate the hassle of going. As I general rule I only go to the doc when it is absolutely necessary. Despite this I've still managed to spend about a dozen evenings in the ER, maybe I am accident prone, or a klutz. Thanks for the info, especially about the Hydrogen Peroxide, I never knew. Double thanks to Dom, now I know. I just always thought of wet=bad place for germs to grow and should be avoided. Anyhow, it is scabbed over now, the infection is gone or nearly gone. It is no longer particularly sensitive and the blackness of rust, oil, and dirt is fading. Looks and feels a whole lot better, but I can't take it easy. I can't set around watching tv with all this beautiful weather. Just got a table saw so my next trip may be to the ER Big Grin

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25-04-2013, 05:33 PM
RE: Is there a doctor in the house? How to treat cuts.




Also: Seriously? Put a fuckin' band-aid on it and go do other stuff. Damn.

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30-04-2013, 08:10 PM
RE: Is there a doctor in the house? How to treat cuts.
(24-04-2013 08:29 PM)Dom Wrote:  My husband had an open wound from his chest to his groin, a deep one.

Daaaaaang! What the hell happened? Velociraptors?
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30-04-2013, 08:22 PM
RE: Is there a doctor in the house? How to treat cuts.
(30-04-2013 08:10 PM)cbb2274 Wrote:  
(24-04-2013 08:29 PM)Dom Wrote:  My husband had an open wound from his chest to his groin, a deep one.

Daaaaaang! What the hell happened? Velociraptors?

No, after another operation he was unable to pass anything - they waited and waited and finally when he was getting ready to sign off they went in and looked around and found his small intestine had attached itself to a surgery wound on his kidney and grown into the forming scar tissue there. Freak post-op accident.

I left him in the hospital at night and when I came back in the early morning he was post op in the ICU again, with a belly that looked like it had a giant zipper going from the chest to the groin.

Then he got an infection and they removed all the stitches and left the wound open to heal, after carving it out even further. It was as wide and deep as a fist. Nuts.

Those wound vacs are miraculous though. Absolutely amazing. Healed up within a couple of months.

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