Is there a safe* glow-in-the-dark metal?
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07-03-2016, 03:32 PM
Is there a safe* glow-in-the-dark metal?
*not radioactive

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07-03-2016, 03:44 PM
RE: Is there a safe* glow-in-the-dark metal?
http://noxton.com/glow-paint-metal-light_en.html

A fluorescent paint coating like this one that was specifically made for metal surfaces is probably as close as you're going to get. Tongue

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07-03-2016, 04:29 PM
RE: Is there a safe* glow-in-the-dark metal?
Are you going to spray paint a gun? Tongue


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And without so much as a mere touch, cut me into little pieces

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07-03-2016, 08:17 PM (This post was last modified: 07-03-2016 09:31 PM by Fireball.)
RE: Is there a safe* glow-in-the-dark metal?
(07-03-2016 03:32 PM)kingschosen Wrote:  *not radioactive

Metals do not generally glow in the dark; they need a source of illumination. Colors that seem extra-bright in daylight are that way because they take light from another portion of the electromagnetic spectrum and return it in our visible spectrum. Since that extra illumination is nonexistent after the sun goes down, nothing can take advantage of the other wavelengths. What are you trying to achieve?
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07-03-2016, 10:01 PM
RE: Is there a safe* glow-in-the-dark metal?
(07-03-2016 08:17 PM)Fireball Wrote:  
(07-03-2016 03:32 PM)kingschosen Wrote:  *not radioactive

Metals do not generally glow in the dark; they need a source of illumination. Colors that seem extra-bright in daylight are that way because they take light from another portion of the electromagnetic spectrum and return it in our visible spectrum. Since that extra illumination is nonexistent after the sun goes down, nothing can take advantage of the other wavelengths. What are you trying to achieve?

This...now, if you throw a little mercury vapor in a tube, excite a carrier gas into a plasma state, run a current through that plasma, and call it a fluorescent light, you just might have something Smile Just not without running high voltage current through it.
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07-03-2016, 10:30 PM
RE: Is there a safe* glow-in-the-dark metal?
Who needs glow in the dark metal when South Korea has already managed to create and clone glow in the dark cats?

You should reexamine your priorities...

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08-03-2016, 03:52 PM
RE: Is there a safe* glow-in-the-dark metal?
I'm exploring the concept of making a blade that can glow in the dark.

It's based on a concept/idea I have for a sword which in turn is based on an ancient Japanese ghost story.

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08-03-2016, 04:05 PM
RE: Is there a safe* glow-in-the-dark metal?
(08-03-2016 03:52 PM)kingschosen Wrote:  I'm exploring the concept of making a blade that can glow in the dark.

It's based on a concept/idea I have for a sword which in turn is based on an ancient Japanese ghost story.

Under what conditions?
(ie, fluorescent or phosphorescent?)

By which I mean, for how long, with what other light sources, to withstand what sort of contact, powered/unpowered, etc... ?

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08-03-2016, 06:21 PM
RE: Is there a safe* glow-in-the-dark metal?
(08-03-2016 03:52 PM)kingschosen Wrote:  I'm exploring the concept of making a blade that can glow in the dark.

It's based on a concept/idea I have for a sword which in turn is based on an ancient Japanese ghost story.

You could use ceramic with a photoluminescent pigment.
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08-03-2016, 06:28 PM (This post was last modified: 08-03-2016 06:35 PM by EvolutionKills.)
RE: Is there a safe* glow-in-the-dark metal?
(07-03-2016 03:32 PM)kingschosen Wrote:  *not radioactive

Fuck!


Killjoy...




But on a more serious note, have you tried Tritium?


The emitted electrons from the radioactive decay of small amounts of tritium cause phosphors to glow so as to make self-powered lighting devices called betalights, which are now used in firearm night sights, watches, exit signs, map lights, knives and a variety of other devices. This takes the place of radium, which can cause bone cancer and has been banned in most countries for decades. Commercial demand for tritium is 400 grams per year and the cost is approximately US $30,000 per gram.

Tritium is an isotope of hydrogen, which allows it to readily bind to hydroxyl radicals, forming tritiated water (HTO), and to carbon atoms. Since tritium is a low energy beta emitter, it is not dangerous externally (its beta particles are unable to penetrate the skin), but it is a radiation hazard when inhaled, ingested via food or water, or absorbed through the skin. HTO has a short biological half-life in the human body of 7 to 14 days, which both reduces the total effects of single-incident ingestion and precludes long-term bioaccumulation of HTO from the environment. Biological half life of tritiated water in human body, which is a measure of body water turn over, varies with season. Studies on biological half life of occupational radiation workers for free water tritium in the coastal region of Karnataka, India show that the biological half life in winter season is twice that of the summer season.



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tritium

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