Jane Austen?
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21-06-2017, 08:50 AM
Jane Austen?
Are there any big Jane Austen fans on TTA? I kinda like her stories, mostly because of the Regency style costumes which are suprisingly difficult to make. Anyway, what's the deal with Jane Austen? There's whole groups of people that belong to the Jane Austen Society. Any Jane Austen people here?

Shakespeare's Comedy of Errors.... on Donald J. Trump:

He is deformed, crooked, old, and sere,
Ill-fac’d, worse bodied, shapeless every where;
Vicious, ungentle, foolish, blunt, unkind,
Stigmatical in making, worse in mind.
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21-06-2017, 08:56 AM
RE: Jane Austen?
[Image: 1457390174767-978180266.jpg?resize=494%2C600]

Always loved her wrestling, when she hits the Stunner...Crazy shit goes down.

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21-06-2017, 09:00 AM (This post was last modified: 21-06-2017 09:28 AM by Emma.)
RE: Jane Austen?
She's my wife's favorite author. I really like a lot of the Austen movies and shows I've seen. We watch them together occasionally. I haven't read any of her books though. I really should though!
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21-06-2017, 09:03 AM
RE: Jane Austen?
(21-06-2017 09:00 AM)Emma Wrote:  She's my wife's favorite author. I really like a lot of the Austin movies and shows I've seen. We watch them together occasionally. I haven't read any of her books though. I really should though!

Milady is a big fan too. I've read Pride and Prejudice and, while it's not really my thing, it is undoubtedly flawless. Pick it up - the book, not the movie. There are levels of depth in the book that are missed on celluloid.
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21-06-2017, 09:11 AM
RE: Jane Austen?
Read all her books in high school (in English, of course). My favourite has always been Persuasion. There is only one (possibly two) movie based on her books that's any good (if you ask me ;-)). Though I haven't seen Northanger Abbey (not my favourite book of hers). I even have her juvenilia. Some hilarious, sarcastic stuff there.

And then, there is Ozten And you thought original Shakespeare was hard to understand, didn't ya? Rolleyes

MRS BENNET: Someone’s finally moving into Netherfield!
ELIZABETH: Really? I thought they were going to tear that down and build a Red Rooster.

MR BENNETT: When the sailors come to town you all act like a pack of flaming galahs! No daughter of mine will be going to schoolies on the Gold Coast! But if you’re very good, Kitty, in a few years you might earn yourself a Blue Light Disco.

ELIZABETH: Bingo has the hots for you, Jane, for sure.

BINGLEY: Isn’t Jane a stunner?
DARCY: I don’t want to use the b-word but…
LYDIA: BURN OUT COMPETITION IN THE CAR PARK, NOW!
DARCY: Jesus H Christ Bingley they’re the biggest bogans I’ve ever seen, you can’t marry into that, you drive a beemer.

ELIZABETH: Wickham! What are you doing here?
WICKHAM: Ehh, chucked a sickie.

LYDIA: Bingo promised us a party! It’ll be super grouse – just like a B and S! I’m hoping for some goon, a bang-up barbie, and a pash.
KITTY: And some fairy bread and a dancefloor.
LYDIA: And a pash.
KITTY: And a pash.

DARCY: Oh, you met Wickham?
ELIZABETH: Yeah, and he didn’t call me a bloody bogan.
DARCY: Well he’s – I – fuck him. *flounces off*
ELIZABETH: What a sooky la la.

MR COLLINS: Cousin Elizabeth.
ELIZABETH: Yeah, nah, mate.

ELIZABETH: Charlotte, he’s a bloody wowser! He’s gonna make you go to church every Sunday and not just at Christmas, and how’s he gonna feel about your Sunday shift at Coles?
CHARLOTTE: Liz, not all of us can get into uni, yeah?
ELIZABETH: But he DRIVES A FORD and wears SOCKS WITH SANDALS.

LADY CATHERINE: And when you’re out in the sun, you must always wear a hat, and a rashie. And trust the life savers, they’re very trained. Although I do wish they’d change the colour of the life savers; red and yellow is simply not my colour. If I were to be a life saver – as a child I’m sure I would have been a very strong swimmer, you know, and I do know the correct way to exit a rip – I should insist on a blue or a green. I’m more of a winter, and so is the Bay, you know.
COLONEL FITZWILLIAM, ASIDE: I love a bit of a life saver. *wink*
LADY CATHERINE: And you must never eat a life saver. Those lollies are just terrible for you.

MR DARCY: Elizabeth.
ELIZABETH: Yeah, nah, mate.
MR DARCY: Yeah, well, your mum’s a bogan and your dad’s a bludger and your sisters are all fucking root rats who wear too much Billabong.
ELIZABETH: My dad’s legit on compo and you’re figjam and you can fuck right off!

LYDIA: We’ve come to meet you! And also buy a new trucker cap and a MAMBO shirt, but I’ve got no cash; can I borrow a pineapple?

UNCLE GARDINER: You know, Lizzie, we’re actually quite near Darcy’s place.
ELIZABETH: Ugh.
AUNT GARDINER: Oh I’ve heard that Pemberley has wonderful views of the Harbour Bridge!
ELIZABETH: But it’s a bloody coat hanger!

ELIZABETH: Well okay I SUPPOSE the bridge does look pretty good from here.

MRS HOUSEKEEPER: And here is the kitchen. It was recently renoed.
AUNT GARDINER: Look at the Hills Hoist out there!
MRS HOUSEKEEPER: It is pretty fucking sweet.
AUNT GARDINER: And the games of goon of fortune you could have there!

ELIZABETH: So look, we only came to Pemberley because my aunt and uncle wanted a sticky beak and… whoa.
DARCY: What?
ELIZABETH: This is a GROUSE pergola.
DARCY: Thanks?
ELIZABETH: I’m not kidding you could have the mother of all barbeques out here.

JANE’S LETTER: …and then mum, hearing the knocks, shrieked, “Has a dingo come for us?!” But it was just the postie with a note. Why she couldn’t of fucking called, I don’t know. Classic Lydia.

JANE: I can’t believe that Lydia would run off with Wickham like that.
ELIZABETH: Come on, I can.
JANE: I guess none of us really wanted to acknowledge that she’s THAT much of a root rat.

WICKHAM: Look I’m sorry for basically kidnapping your sister, marrying her, and pissing off you and your dad. I hope this doesn’t affect all the future flirting I plan to send your way.
ELIZABETH: I’m gonna put a potato in your Monaro’s tailpipe, you complete deadshit.

LADY CATHERINE: I’ve heard some shit.
ELIZABETH: Are you sure?
LADY CATHERINE: Are you, or are you not, moving in with my nephew?
ELIZABETH: Sheila, have you seen the size of his backyard pool and his Hills Hoist?

DARCY: And then when Aunty Cath came back mad as a cut snake I knew you still had the hots for me.
ELIZABETH: That obvious, was it?

Anyone wondering if they're actually in a Jane Austen novel? Here's how you find out for sure Rolleyes

Someone disagreeable is trying to persuade you to take a trip to Bath.

Your father is absolutely terrible with money. No one has ever told him this.

All of your dresses look like nightgowns.

Someone disagreeable tries to persuade you to join a game of cards.

A woman who hates you is playing the pianoforte.

A picnic has gone horribly wrong.

A member of the armed forces has revealed himself to be morally deficient.

You once took a walk with a cad.

Everyone in the neighborhood, including your mother, has ranked you and your sisters in order of hotness. You know exactly where you fall on the list.

You say something arch yet generous about another woman both younger and richer than you.

You have one friend; he is thirty years old and does business with your father and you are going to marry him someday.

You attempt to befriend someone slightly above or slightly below your social station and are soundly punished for it.

A girl you have only just met tells you a secret, and you despise her for it.

You have five hundred a year. From who? Five hundred what? No one knows. No one cares. You have it. It’s yours. Every year. All five hundred of it.

There are three men in your life: one true love, one tempting but rakish acquaintance, and a third distant possibility — he is courteous and attentive but only slightly interested in you. He is almost certainly the cousin or good friend of your true love, and nothing will ever happen between you two.

A woman who is not your mother treats you like her own daughter. Your actual mother is dead or ridiculous.

You develop a resentment at a public dance.

Someone you know has fallen ill. Not melodramatically ill, just interestingly so.

A man proposes to you, then to another, lesser woman when you politely spurn him. This delights you to no end.

A charming man attempts to flirt with you. This is terrible.

You have become exceedingly ashamed of what your conduct has been.

A shocking marriage of convenience takes place within your social circle two-thirds of the way in.

A woman in an absurd hat is being an absolute bitch to you; there is nothing you can do about it.

You are in a garden, and you are astonished.

"E se non passa la tristezza con altri occhi la guarderò."
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21-06-2017, 09:12 AM
RE: Jane Austen?
I'm not a Jane Austen Society type, but I respect and admire Austen and her writing. I've read and reread all of her novels and seen most of the TV and film adaptations of them. I've even seen some of the adaptations more than once, which is unusual for me when it comes to movies.

I wouldn't want to live under those circumstances, but I love the way Austen handles dialogue, character, and conflict. And I love the idea of Bath--which seems to me like some third-rate beach community that thinks it's the Hamptons--all the slightly important people slumming and the nobodies trying to catch a break and the teenagers trying to have fun outside of the grownups' eyes--and also the way Austen writes about Bath, with sardonic, but genuine, affection.

I wouldn't want to go getting dressed up as an Austen heroine and prancing around, nor would I want to spend a whole weekend talking about Mr. Darcy, but I do like the aesthetics, at least as they're presented in the movies and TV.
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21-06-2017, 09:26 AM
RE: Jane Austen?
I should note that my wife really likes the name "Emma", partially because of the Jane Austen book. And that's part of why I chose the name. Tongue (Mainly because I really like it too, I think it's pretty)
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21-06-2017, 09:39 AM
RE: Jane Austen?
Huge Jane Austen fan. Don't do any weird shit, just read the books.

It's funny, my friends husband (before they were together) admitted once he read Emma to get laid.

I found very funny since he's incredibly well read....

I'm not that into books, but there is something about some of the characters in Austen's novels that do resonate with me.


But as if to knock me down, reality came around
And without so much as a mere touch, cut me into little pieces

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21-06-2017, 09:41 AM
RE: Jane Austen?
I think Mark Twain said it best:

I haven't any right to criticise books, and I don't do it except when I hate them. I often want to criticise Jane Austen, but her books madden me so that I can't conceal my frenzy from the reader; and therefore I have to stop every time I begin. Everytime I read 'Pride and Prejudice' I want to dig her up and beat her over the skull with her own shin-bone.
- Letter to Joseph Twichell, 13 September 1898
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21-06-2017, 10:35 AM
RE: Jane Austen?
(21-06-2017 09:41 AM)Mr. Boston Wrote:  I think Mark Twain said it best:

I haven't any right to criticise books, and I don't do it except when I hate them. I often want to criticise Jane Austen, but her books madden me so that I can't conceal my frenzy from the reader; and therefore I have to stop every time I begin. Everytime I read 'Pride and Prejudice' I want to dig her up and beat her over the skull with her own shin-bone.
- Letter to Joseph Twichell, 13 September 1898

Laugh out load Did Twain say why he hated her writing so much? I'd love to know. My understanding is that some of today's English grammer rules come from Jane Austen's novels. ( I read that somewhere but don't recall exactly where) Maybe that's why Mark Twain disliked her writing. He wasn't much on paying attention to correct English grammer.

Shakespeare's Comedy of Errors.... on Donald J. Trump:

He is deformed, crooked, old, and sere,
Ill-fac’d, worse bodied, shapeless every where;
Vicious, ungentle, foolish, blunt, unkind,
Stigmatical in making, worse in mind.
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