Jane Austen?
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21-06-2017, 12:10 PM (This post was last modified: 21-06-2017 12:25 PM by Vera.)
RE: Jane Austen?
Moms, I read it is an adult (not sure if still religious, possibly). Didn't help one teensie weensie bit [Image: puke.gif]

And Charlotte Bronte was a bitch, who tried to suppress the works of her, arguably (well, I argue it at the very least Rolleyes ) much more talented and forward-thinking sister, Anne. Among other things, for daring to write about - gasp! - a strong woman (not the bloody misogynistic caricatures created by her (and Emily's) diseased imaginations) who actually left her POS of a husband and didn't necessarily need a big strong man in her life, another gasp. Also, for daring to admit she was struggling with losing her faith.

FUCK, Charlotte, is what I say. She can go jump from the mad wife's attic for all I care. Censored

"ETERNAL Power, of earth and air!
Unseen, yet seen in all around,
Remote, but dwelling everywhere,
Though silent, heard in every sound.

If e'er thine ear in mercy bent,
When wretched mortals cried to Thee,
And if, indeed, Thy Son was sent,
To save lost sinners such as me:

Then hear me now, while, kneeling here,
I lift to thee my heart and eye,
And all my soul ascends in prayer,
Oh, give me–give me Faith! I cry.

Without some glimmering in my heart,
I could not raise this fervent prayer;
But, oh! a stronger light impart,
And in Thy mercy fix it there.

While Faith is with me, I am blest;
It turns my darkest night to day;
But while I clasp it to my breast,
I often feel it slide away.


Then, cold and dark, my spirit sinks,
To see my light of life depart;
And every fiend of Hell, methinks,
Enjoys the anguish of my heart.

What shall I do, if all my love,
My hopes, my toil, are cast away,
And if there be no God above,
To hear and bless me when I pray?

If this be vain delusion all,
If death be an eternal sleep,

And none can hear my secret call,
Or see the silent tears I weep!

Oh, help me, God! For thou alone
Canst my distracted soul relieve;
Forsake it not: it is thine own,
Though weak, yet longing to believe.

Oh, drive these cruel doubts away;
And make me know, that Thou art God!
A faith, that shines by night and day,
Will lighten every earthly load.

If I believe that Jesus died,
And, waking, rose to reign above;
Then surely Sorrow, Sin, and Pride,
Must yield to Peace, and Hope, and Love.

And all the blessed words He said
Will strength and holy joy impart:
A shield of safety o'er my head,
A spring of comfort in my heart."

Also, like I've said before, it makes me so incredibly sad (and mad), thinking about all the anguish and pain religion has brought into the lives of billions, making their life a hell on earth... Undecided

"E se non passa la tristezza con altri occhi la guarderò."
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21-06-2017, 12:10 PM
RE: Jane Austen?
(21-06-2017 11:48 AM)Vera Wrote:  God, Little Women, dumbest, annoyingest, self-righteousest, preachiest shit I've ever read in my life. Ditto for the characters, wanted to punch each and every one. Multiple times. [Image: pukingemoticon.gif]

You think the book is bad, there's a play of Little Women. I had to design the costumes for it and watch he damned play several times during rehearsals. Your throw up icon is spot on.

Shakespeare's Comedy of Errors.... on Donald J. Trump:

He is deformed, crooked, old, and sere,
Ill-fac’d, worse bodied, shapeless every where;
Vicious, ungentle, foolish, blunt, unkind,
Stigmatical in making, worse in mind.
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21-06-2017, 12:15 PM
RE: Jane Austen?
(21-06-2017 11:55 AM)julep Wrote:  Austen's from the generation before Twain, and it's not surprising that he doesn't appreciate her (pretty common for the next gens to diss the one immediately preceding). Twain has company. Edmund Crispin, for example, calls Austen heroines "vulgar little man-hunting minxes," and Charlotte Bronte and Virginia Woolf are also among her detractors.

However, it's easy for me to love both Austen and Twain. She works in miniatures while he works in landscapes.

It's not entirely generational, though. Twain also disliked Henry James ("our finest lady writer"), who was from Twain's own generation, but whose writing probably has more in common with Austen's than Twain's. I haven't read anything by Austen (although I plan to do so at some point), but I like both James and Twain.
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21-06-2017, 12:24 PM
RE: Jane Austen?
Dance, I feel your pain! At least the movie version has a very young Christian Bale going for it. Not that I've seen it.

I did, however, see (and liked [Image: embarrassed.gif]) The Road to Avonlea... Okay, I was a kid/very early teens. And def. still religious, but still, the shame is real, man [Image: embarrassed.gif]

"E se non passa la tristezza con altri occhi la guarderò."
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21-06-2017, 12:34 PM
RE: Jane Austen?
(21-06-2017 12:10 PM)Vera Wrote:  Moms, I read it is an adult (not sure if still religious, possibly). Didn't help one teensie weensie bit [Image: puke.gif]

And Charlotte Bronte was a bitch, who tried to suppress the works of her, arguably (well, I argue it at the very least Rolleyes ) much more talented and forward-thinking sister, Anne. Among other things, for daring to write about - gasp! - a strong woman (not the bloody misogynistic caricatures created by her (and Emily's) diseased imaginations) who actually left his POS of a husband and didn't necessarily need a big strong man in her life, another gasp. Also, for daring to admit she was struggling with losing her faith.

FUCK, Charlotte, is what I say. She can go jump from the mad wife's attic for all I care. Censored

"ETERNAL Power, of earth and air!
Unseen, yet seen in all around,
Remote, but dwelling everywhere,
Though silent, heard in every sound.

If e'er thine ear in mercy bent,
When wretched mortals cried to Thee,
And if, indeed, Thy Son was sent,
To save lost sinners such as me:

Then hear me now, while, kneeling here,
I lift to thee my heart and eye,
And all my soul ascends in prayer,
Oh, give me–give me Faith! I cry.

Without some glimmering in my heart,
I could not raise this fervent prayer;
But, oh! a stronger light impart,
And in Thy mercy fix it there.

While Faith is with me, I am blest;
It turns my darkest night to day;
But while I clasp it to my breast,
I often feel it slide away.


Then, cold and dark, my spirit sinks,
To see my light of life depart;
And every fiend of Hell, methinks,
Enjoys the anguish of my heart.

What shall I do, if all my love,
My hopes, my toil, are cast away,
And if there be no God above,
To hear and bless me when I pray?

If this be vain delusion all,
If death be an eternal sleep,

And none can hear my secret call,
Or see the silent tears I weep!

Oh, help me, God! For thou alone
Canst my distracted soul relieve;
Forsake it not: it is thine own,
Though weak, yet longing to believe.

Oh, drive these cruel doubts away;
And make me know, that Thou art God!
A faith, that shines by night and day,
Will lighten every earthly load.

If I believe that Jesus died,
And, waking, rose to reign above;
Then surely Sorrow, Sin, and Pride,
Must yield to Peace, and Hope, and Love.

And all the blessed words He said
Will strength and holy joy impart:
A shield of safety o'er my head,
A spring of comfort in my heart."

Also, like I've said before, it makes me so incredibly sad (and mad), thinking about all the anguish and pain religion has brought into the lives of billions, making their life a hell on earth... Undecided

Meanwhile across the Pond was Emily Dickenson. My mother looooved Emily Dickenson's poetry because it was so sparce and contained. My mom had several of her books and as a moody teenager I would sometimes pick one of the books and read all about death and other sad situations. Most of the time I really didn't understand what the hell I was reading but I thought it was cool anyway.

It's so sad that women weren't allowed to write and publish their writings until the
a couple centuries ago. So sad indeed. Imagine what past history would look like if women had been allowed to go to schools and universities. My gawd. The world would be very different. It would have changed history.

Shakespeare's Comedy of Errors.... on Donald J. Trump:

He is deformed, crooked, old, and sere,
Ill-fac’d, worse bodied, shapeless every where;
Vicious, ungentle, foolish, blunt, unkind,
Stigmatical in making, worse in mind.
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21-06-2017, 12:48 PM
RE: Jane Austen?
Oh god, yes! For a HUGE part of humankind's history we (and by we, I mean the vileness that are the Abrahamic religions) decided to forgo the potential of HALF the human race (and that's not even taking into consideration all the talented people, even geniuses, who'd had the misfortune to have been born in the "lower" classes and spent their whole lives struggling for a loaf of bread).

What's even more stupefying, quite a few members of the "unfair sex" seem desperate that it remain this way. I wonder why Sleepy

"E se non passa la tristezza con altri occhi la guarderò."
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21-06-2017, 12:50 PM
RE: Jane Austen?
LOVE Jane Austen; she's one of my favourite authors.
I have read all her works, several times.
Her books improve upon reading, there always seem to be subtleties I missed.

I once read all of Pride and Prejudice aloud to my hubby and teen-aged children during an 8-hour road-trip to Niagara.
Initially they thought "huh?", but by the end they were begging for me to keep reading, when all I wanted was to give my voice a rest.

Your faith is not evidence, your opinion is not fact, and your bias is not wisdom
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21-06-2017, 12:54 PM
RE: Jane Austen?
(21-06-2017 12:48 PM)Vera Wrote:  Oh god, yes! For a HUGE part of humankind's history we (and by we, I mean the vileness that are the Abrahamic religions) decided to forgo the potential of HALF the human race (and that's not even taking into consideration all the talented people, even geniuses, who'd had the misfortune to have been born in the "lower" classes and spent their whole lives struggling for a loaf of bread).

What's even more stupefying, quite a few members of the "unfair sex" seem desperate that it remain this way. I wonder why Sleepy

Quite sad for humanity really. All the good and knowledge of the Noether's, Marie Curie's and De Chatelet's we've missed.

" Generally speaking, the errors in religion are dangerous; those in philosophy only ridiculous."
David Hume
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21-06-2017, 03:14 PM
RE: Jane Austen?
On a lighter note ...
Austenland




I found this movie to be pretty cute.
It's lovingly absurd and the entire cast is obviously having a blast. Jane Seymour shines in her role as demented head of household and Jennifer Coolidge is hilarious.

A new type of thinking is essential if mankind is to survive and move to higher levels. ~ Albert Einstein
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21-06-2017, 03:37 PM (This post was last modified: 21-06-2017 04:27 PM by Rockblossom.)
RE: Jane Austen?
(21-06-2017 11:48 AM)Vera Wrote:  God, Little Women, dumbest, annoyingest, self-righteousest, preachiest shit I've ever read in my life. Ditto for the characters, wanted to punch each and every one. Multiple times. [Image: pukingemoticon.gif]

But wasn't the author (L.M. Alcott) an American? So can't blame her on the British.

To me, one of the big differences between Alcott and Austen is that the former was oh-so-sincere about her characters, whereas Austen was essentially making fun of her characters and the conventions of her time. While the romantic novels of her time were all about Emotion, Chivalry and True Love; marriages (at least in Austen's class) were actually all about money and social position. Alcott was a slog to get through and left my brain cells wanting to find a dark place to hide, while Austen (though not really my genre of choice) was at least slyly humorous.

Like Alcott's work, I only got through the required reading of Little House on the Prairie by hoping I would turn the page and get to read about the whole Ingalls family being eaten by bears. Evil_monster (Sorry, Little House fans. Angel )

I’ll be a story in your head, but that’s okay, because we’re all stories in the end. Just make it a good one, eh? Because it was, you know. It was the best.
The Doctor
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