Jesus' Method of Execution
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02-04-2013, 02:53 PM
RE: Jesus' Method of Execution
(02-04-2013 02:51 PM)Chas Wrote:  
(02-04-2013 02:45 PM)Momsurroundedbyboys Wrote:  It's a physical reaction. Much like what happens during auto-erotic asphyxiation.


The voice of experience? Consider

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05-04-2013, 08:26 AM
RE: Jesus' Method of Execution
I always make these "insight" threads and never bother to thank anyone for their input. I just kind of sit back and take it all in and move on.

I do appreciate it, however. There are frequently interesting points being made, and I'm glad there are those intelligent enough to respond. Much obliged. Thumbsup

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07-04-2013, 07:08 PM
RE: Jesus' Method of Execution
(05-04-2013 08:26 AM)Misanthropik Wrote:  I always make these "insight" threads and never bother to thank anyone for their input. I just kind of sit back and take it all in and move on.

I do appreciate it, however. There are frequently interesting points being made, and I'm glad there are those intelligent enough to respond. Much obliged. Thumbsup

I've got a couple of other points worth making re the crucifixion.

Luke had a dying Jesus say
“Father, forgive them, they do not know what they are doing” (Luke 23:34, NJB), referring to the Roman soldiers who had just scourged, mocked and nailed him to a cross. Yeshua is more likely to have damned these soldiers with his dying breath.

A centurion supposedly said,
“In truth this was the Son of God” (Matt. 27:54, NJB). Yet Christianity, which claimed Jesus was the son of God, had yet to be invented!

The men Yeshua was crucified with were labeled as “lestai,” incorrectly translated in some Bibles as “robbers.” In fact “lestai” was a derogatory term for insurrectionists, who, by armed action, opposed Roman rule (http://www.drabruzzi.com/jesus_movement.htm and http://haqol.wordpress.com/2010/12/30/th...i-rebel/). So Jesus was crucified between two zealots, but we’re told wasn’t one himself. I think informed readers are too perceptive to fall for that.

Roman law allowed no burial rights to those killed by crucifixion. Yeshua’s emaciated body would have been left for the scavenging birds and dogs as a deterrent to others who might disobey Rome, although it’s possible Pilate made an exception and gave permission for the body to be buried.
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07-04-2013, 07:18 PM
RE: Jesus' Method of Execution
What my mind sees when I hear "Jesus died on the stake". Rolleyes

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07-04-2013, 07:24 PM
RE: Jesus' Method of Execution
(07-04-2013 07:08 PM)Mark Fulton Wrote:  The men Yeshua was crucified with were labeled as “lestai,” incorrectly translated in some Bibles as “robbers.” In fact “lestai” was a derogatory term for insurrectionists,

MF, I Googled "lestai" Shocking
Its a pornsite!

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07-04-2013, 07:27 PM
RE: Jesus' Method of Execution
Crucifixion was an ancient method of execution in which the victim's hands and feet were bound and nailed to a cross. There was a strong social stigma associated with crucifixion, a punishment reserved for traitors, captive armies, slaves and the worst of criminals. Detailed descriptions of crucifixions are few, perhaps because secular historians could not bear to describe the gruesome events of this horrible practice. However, archaeological finds from first century Palestine have shed a great deal of light on this early form of death penalty.

Four basic structures or types of crosses were used for crucifixions:
Crux Simplex was a single upright stake or post upon which the victim was tied or impaled. It was the simplest, most primitive cross used for capitol punishment of criminals. The victim's hands and feet were bound and nailed to the stake using just one nail through both wrists and one nail through both ankles, with a wooden plank fastened to the stake as a footrest. Most often, at some point the victim's legs would be broken, hurrying death by asphyxiation.

Crux Commissa was a capital T-shaped structure, also known as St. Anthony's cross or the Tau Cross, named after the Greek letter ("Tau") that it resembles. The horizontal beam of the Crux Commissa or "connected cross" was connected at the top of the vertical stake. This cross was very similar in shape and function to the Crux Immissa

Crux Decussata was an X-shaped cross, also called St. Andrew's cross. The Crux Decussata was named after the Roman "decussis," or Roman numeral ten. It is believed that the Apostle Andrew was crucified on an X-shaped cross at his own request. As tradition tells, he felt unworthy to die on the same type of cross on which his Lord, Jesus Christ, had died.

Crux Immissa was the familiar lower case, t-shaped structure upon which the Lord, Jesus Christ was crucified according to Scripture and tradition. Immissa means "inserted." This cross had a vertical stake with a horizontal cross beam (called a patibulum) inserted across the upper portion. Also called the Latin cross, the Crux Immissa has become the most widely recognized symbol of Christianity today.

Upside Down Crucifixions
At times victims were crucified upside down. Historians report that at his own request, the Apostle Peter was crucified with his head toward the ground because he did not feel worthy to die in the same manner as his Lord, Jesus Christ.
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07-04-2013, 07:31 PM
RE: Jesus' Method of Execution
(07-04-2013 07:27 PM)TheJCexperience Wrote:  Crucifixion was an ancient method of execution in which the victim's hands and feet were bound and nailed to a cross. There was a strong social stigma associated with crucifixion, a punishment reserved for traitors, captive armies, slaves and the worst of criminals. Detailed descriptions of crucifixions are few, perhaps because secular historians could not bear to describe the gruesome events of this horrible practice. However, archaeological finds from first century Palestine have shed a great deal of light on this early form of death penalty.

Four basic structures or types of crosses were used for crucifixions:
Crux Simplex was a single upright stake or post upon which the victim was tied or impaled. It was the simplest, most primitive cross used for capitol punishment of criminals. The victim's hands and feet were bound and nailed to the stake using just one nail through both wrists and one nail through both ankles, with a wooden plank fastened to the stake as a footrest. Most often, at some point the victim's legs would be broken, hurrying death by asphyxiation.

Crux Commissa was a capital T-shaped structure, also known as St. Anthony's cross or the Tau Cross, named after the Greek letter ("Tau") that it resembles. The horizontal beam of the Crux Commissa or "connected cross" was connected at the top of the vertical stake. This cross was very similar in shape and function to the Crux Immissa

Crux Decussata was an X-shaped cross, also called St. Andrew's cross. The Crux Decussata was named after the Roman "decussis," or Roman numeral ten. It is believed that the Apostle Andrew was crucified on an X-shaped cross at his own request. As tradition tells, he felt unworthy to die on the same type of cross on which his Lord, Jesus Christ, had died.

Crux Immissa was the familiar lower case, t-shaped structure upon which the Lord, Jesus Christ was crucified according to Scripture and tradition. Immissa means "inserted." This cross had a vertical stake with a horizontal cross beam (called a patibulum) inserted across the upper portion. Also called the Latin cross, the Crux Immissa has become the most widely recognized symbol of Christianity today.

Upside Down Crucifixions
At times victims were crucified upside down. Historians report that at his own request, the Apostle Peter was crucified with his head toward the ground because he did not feel worthy to die in the same manner as his Lord, Jesus Christ.

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