Jobs Without a Time Clock
Post Reply
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
09-07-2012, 11:14 AM
Jobs Without a Time Clock
I'm in the middle of what has become a common Monday morning dilemma for me. I work in outside sales and don't have a direct manager so I have very little accountability. I guess technically the GM is my manager, but he has a very laissez-faire management style...meaning, almost non-existent. I can get away with doing things the way I want to with little consequence, except to limiting my own income, I suppose.

So my dilemma is...I'm supposed to be working, but I have very little motivation. I'm burned out and don't like making cold calls or even warm calls at this point. Large amounts of money is not the motivator for me that it seemingly is for other people. Hard work and a sense of accomplishment after a long work day are also not very strong motivators for me. In essence, I struggle to make myself go to work, especially if it's after a weekend or vacation. I'd much rather be here watching CNN, surfing the net and playing with my dog. However, I know that I will soon start feeling very anxious that I've wasted the past few hours and feel guilty about not putting in a full day of work.

Anyone else have a job where you don't have to log in? If so, what motivates you? How do you keep going even when no outside force is keeping your nose to the grindstone? Anyone else as lazy as I am? No

"All that is necessary for the triumph of Calvinism is that good Atheists do nothing." ~Eric Oh My
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes Erxomai's post
09-07-2012, 11:25 AM
RE: Jobs Without a Time Clock
Last job I had I would go basically live in apartments as I cleaned them up and painted them. I had absolutely no supervision and was paid by giving a sheet with times I wrote myself. I worked hard to get things done and generally kept the horseplay to a minimum. Did plenty of work while going ahead and doing anything I happened to need on the side. It made life simpler for me and was much better than having to deal with other people and their issues with me being alive. I was pretty happy to have a hands off job an the main thing that kept the momentum for me was just that it was a better option than any of those button pushing jobs where you spend half your workday getting talked to by some boss. It's nice to be able to do things on your own, so maybe it'll perk you up quite a bit that you could be doing the same job with annoying quotas hearing some asshole seedy seeming guy who thinks you're just not putting enough "effort" into your work.

Since there aren't restricions you can do your jb and get what you want to get done done. So just look for a good mix of doing both.

I'm not a non believer, I believe in the possibility of anything. I just don't let the actuality of something be determined by a 3rd party.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 2 users Like Lilith Pride's post
09-07-2012, 11:29 AM
RE: Jobs Without a Time Clock
Until I was self employed, I was definitely the type to do a good job, but only as good as needed. I was never really motivated to do anything more than was necessary to bring in a pay cheque.

Then I started what I do now. Farmer/rat breeder/etc. I discovered that not only was my income dependant on how well I performed my tasks, but that I really wanted to do things the best way I could. I think it had a lot to do with how directly my work affected the amount of food on my table. Suddenly I was motivated, because I saw direct and immediate results, that were in direct proportion to the amount of effort I put in.

I am not money motivated. I am happiness motivated. Working brings in money, without which we would be very unhappy (no food, shelter, clothing, makes for pretty miserable living conditions). But when the work is also something that you enjoys most of the time, it makes that extra, not-so-enjoyable aspect of your day a whole heck of a lot more tolerable. The key is, stop waiting for the situation to fall into your lap. I get told all the time how lucky I am to be able to do what I do. I call bullshit. It took huge effort and sacrifice to get to where I am, and continues to take huge effort and sacrifice to stay here and continue to progress. You gotta get out there and look for the situation that best motivates you and keeps you happy. And if you can't find it, create it.

Just visiting.

-SR
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 2 users Like Stark Raving's post
09-07-2012, 02:11 PM
RE: Jobs Without a Time Clock
(09-07-2012 11:14 AM)Erxomai Wrote:  Anyone else have a job where you don't have to log in? If so, what motivates you? How do you keep going even when no outside force is keeping your nose to the grindstone? Anyone else as lazy as I am?

A resounding YES. And that little sad "no" guy shaking his noggin isn't helping me get off my ass, either. Dodgy

From the time I was 15 years of age, until 4 years ago, I was "employed", and often in full time positions alongside a part time position elsewhere. That's 28 years. In fact since 1984 until 2008, there was not a single week I did not have at least two employers and at one time, was even self employed.

All through this time, I always managed my life outside "work", but I know many things took a back seat to maintaining that gainful employment. For instance, though I had the money and did well, it took probably three times as long just to put myself through school -everything was structured around "the job" situation.

In 2008, I left my full time position(mgt) in one company because among other reasons, I felt the part time position I maintained at another company would better provide for my needs. As a result, I now have one job, part time/full benefits. I'm still adjusting to this luxury.

I feel at times defiantly lazy while other times I feel like just a waste of space - not sad about it, it's just how it feels. I know it's my own guilt trip, but I also think I've begun to almost neglect other aspects of my life because I am just completely burnt out.

It's not that I lack motivation - I'm motivated as hell. It's that I just don't want to DO anything concerning that motivation... it would be too much work. At times, and really for the first time in my life, I've found myself easily bored even after beginning a creative project that I really would love to see realized. This is a struggle for me.

I've never had such low stress but everything still feels odd... I've only recently begun looking at it from a health perspective. I'm happy with the zero job stress; pressure to perform is next to nothing, and I've positioned myself well, so I could concentrate on "me" for a change.

I feel almost as if I'm slowly deprograming myself from being a slave to something outside myself. How familiar does that sound? Wink

I had to learn to be selfish with me. I'm slowly dragging myself through that "non-motivation" stage, and little by little I'm starting to do some things for myself -just for me- and it feels pretty good. I've found that if I'm to do anything, the motivating factor needs to be me. I've found the more I do for me, the easier it gets to follow through with any further motivation. And what do you know... sometimes, I even feel quite accomplished.

Like Stark said - "You gotta get out there and look for the situation that best motivates you and keeps you happy. And if you can't find it, create it." For a while, I didn't even want to create that situation... sometimes, I still don't. I had to start really looking for myself within the creative process to even want to DO anything. I found that is the thing that keeps me at it.

It's a struggle to find out where I fit between desire and necessity. It seems like such a small thing... but I still struggle with it.
Sheesh, right now I don't even want to get up and take out the trash. If I don't, I might eventually find myself under it... funny how things pile up so fast when I don't seem to be doing anything. Blink

I think in the end, I just feel like I'm a secular person who has a skeptical eye toward any extraordinary claim, carefully examining any extraordinary evidence before jumping to conclusions. ~ Eric ~ My friend ... who figured it out.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
09-07-2012, 03:03 PM
RE: Jobs Without a Time Clock
I love to be employed, or to work in general. I see what i get from it. I worked since I was allowed to, every holiday I worked. I was unemployed for a short time (due to illness) but apart from that I always enjoy working. Yes, I have those days, especially lately, when I simply feel too tired in the morning, and I wish I would not lose money in case I am late to work. But my direct employer is shitty and I can't change it, so I just go and work. I am the person that thinks practical about it. The job itself is pretty monotone, very repetative, but pays well. So I try not to stay home sick, I am on time every day, and I play my cards well.
That's all there is for me. I don't feel like going to work? Fuck it, I am going to work!

[Image: 69p7qx.gif]
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes Leela's post
09-07-2012, 04:07 PM
RE: Jobs Without a Time Clock
(09-07-2012 02:11 PM)kim Wrote:  I feel at times defiantly lazy while other times I feel like just a waste of space - not sad about it, it's just how it feels. I know it's my own guilt trip, but I also think I've begun to almost neglect other aspects of my life because I am just completely burnt out.

It's not that I lack motivation - I'm motivated as hell. It's that I just don't want to DO anything concerning that motivation... it would be too much work. At times, and really for the first time in my life, I've found myself easily bored even after beginning a creative project that I really would love to see realized. This is a struggle for me.

This part I can relate to. The part about having two jobs for most of your life is completely foreign to me.

"All that is necessary for the triumph of Calvinism is that good Atheists do nothing." ~Eric Oh My
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
09-07-2012, 05:44 PM
RE: Jobs Without a Time Clock
I am sort of self-employed.
I started a software company 18 months ago with two other guys. I had a software consulting business in the 80's, too. I love creating software and can work extremely hard - but only when motivated. The motivation is sometimes internal, but I often need a kick in the ass like a deadline.

I can be extremely lazy when I don't have the urge or need to create, debug, test. Sometimes it goes for days or even weeks, but ultimately something kicks in and I get off my ass.

One of my techniques is to do the least interesting thing on the to do list to get it out of the way so I can get to the good stuff.

I wouldn't do sales if you held a gun to my head. No

Skepticism is not a position; it is an approach to claims.
Science is not a subject, but a method.
[Image: flagstiny%206.gif]
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 3 users Like Chas's post
09-07-2012, 08:03 PM
RE: Jobs Without a Time Clock
I have been self employed all my life. It started in grade school when I charged the other kids for doing their homework. And it never stopped. I have had a lot of very different kinds of businesses, and when I got bored or annoyed with them I sold them. I have always made enough money to keep on keeping on, and I've always had staff to do what I don't want to.

Like all entrepreneurs worth a shit, I've lost my ass a couple of times, but overall I have done well for myself.

Motivation comes all by itself - I get an idea for a business and just go for it. It's fun to do.

Now with the web I can even do it from home in my pyjamas. The only thing that ever slowed me down was my husband's illness and death, I am on a working vacation since then, I deal with mail and queries in the morning and am available for questions by staff. I am not growing anything now, just keeping things running.

I am realizing that it's the suspense of growing a business that gives me incentive, I am getting bored on my hiatus here. Maybe at the end of my sabbatical I will sell out and start something new - I caught myself poking around at ideas the other day.

We'll see what happens. I know one thing - I would make a lousy employee. I don't subordiante well, and I thrive on ideas and creativity, something most jobs don't allow. Also, making money for someone else takes all the fun out of it, the personal interest in seeing things grow isn't there and the suspense of how it will all turn out is missing.

[Image: dobie.png]

Science is the process we've designed to be responsible for generating our best guess as to what the fuck is going on. Girly Man
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 3 users Like Dom's post
10-07-2012, 03:16 AM
RE: Jobs Without a Time Clock
I had my own business for a short time. I gave it up before it had a chance to get running properly because I moved out of the country.
But for the time, I really worked, and I liked it. I had days when I worked 12, 13, 14 hours a day, and on other days I did 4 or 5 hours. I did everything myself and it was fun, and exciting, and boring (everything that has to do with numbers, because numbers are evil!).
I had a few times when I needed to kick my own ass, because I did not want to leave the house but I had to.
But I am good in kicking my own ass, so it worked just fine Big Grin I am positive that given a few more month it would have been a good business, running and all.
My motivation was that I actually could see what I produced as half of the things that I sold where made by myself. I liked seeing the ready product and have people who want to buy it. I liked advertising my stuff.... Was cool!

[Image: 69p7qx.gif]
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
10-07-2012, 03:58 AM
RE: Jobs Without a Time Clock
Erx,
Does your performance directly impact putting food on other people's tables? If salespeople don't sell... no revenue, no company.

Do you believe in the products/services you are selling? (I use the term "believe in" in a non-religious sense.

Does competition with / against other sales staff excite you?

Do you like setting yourself goals (not just sales or revenue targets) that when met give you a sense of pride / achievement?

If the answers to these questions is "no"... change jobs.


I am sure that I don't need to say that you need to find out what drives / motivates / excites you... outcomes / targets / deadlines / your own happiness / the happiness of others etc.

Maybe it's about sharing your wisdom and experiences with others so that they can learn from you mistakes / successes, if so:
a) Write a book
b) Become a trainer
c) Become a priest

Just a thought.

Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply
Forum Jump: