Journalism at its finest
Post Reply
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
16-10-2012, 01:25 PM
Journalism at its finest
Story here.

Snippet:

Late Friday night, the boys snuck out of Corey's home to go skateboarding and were caught by the cops for violating curfew. After police brought the boys back to the Sundermans' home, Crystal Sunderman tried to make sure the teens wouldn't run out again.

Late Friday night, the boys snuck out of Corey's home to go skateboarding and were caught by the cops for violating curfew.

the boys snuck out of Corey's home to go skateboarding and were caught by the cops

the boys snuck out of Corey's home

snuck

Really? Snuck? Really?

Might as well use "ain't" in there was well.

[Image: dog-shaking.gif]
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
16-10-2012, 01:27 PM
RE: Journalism at its finest
There ain't no problem usin' snuck in my books. Well, pamphlet. Big Grin

[Image: 3d366d5c-72a0-4228-b835-f404c2970188_zps...1381867723]
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
16-10-2012, 01:28 PM
RE: Journalism at its finest
Good newspapers can use colloquialisms surely? Oh i 4got ur an Ing-LiSh, teeChar Tongue

Bechased
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes morondog's post
16-10-2012, 02:07 PM
RE: Journalism at its finest
This is a battle not worth fighting, KC. If you google "snuck" you'll find a hundred discussions of "sneaked" vs. "snuck." The bottom line is that a lot of authorities now count "snuck" as fully acceptable alongside "sneaked."

Here, for example, is the Merriam-Webster online dictionary entry for "sneak":

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionar...1350417556

As you'll see, the Usage Discussion says:

Merriam-Webster Wrote:From its earliest appearance in print in the late 19th century as a dialectal and probably uneducated form, the past and past participle snuck has risen to the status of standard and to approximate equality with sneaked. It is most common in the United States and Canada but has also been spotted in British and Australian English. [Emphasis added.]

Religious disputes are like arguments in a madhouse over which inmate really is Napoleon.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
16-10-2012, 03:20 PM
RE: Journalism at its finest
[Image: borrowing.jpeg?w=450]

Nuff said. Drinking Beverage

[Image: 3d366d5c-72a0-4228-b835-f404c2970188_zps...1381867723]
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 6 users Like cheapthrillseaker's post
Post Reply
Forum Jump: