Jupiter Question
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10-07-2016, 07:28 AM
RE: Jupiter Question
Cool gif, RS. Is it me or does it look like Jupiter is outside of Saturn?

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The very idea of God is a product of the human imagination."
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10-07-2016, 07:34 AM
RE: Jupiter Question
It looks that way to me also.

"They think, therefore I am" - god
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10-07-2016, 01:22 PM
RE: Jupiter Question
(10-07-2016 06:45 AM)RocketSurgeon76 Wrote:  Jupiter gets most of it, but not all. That's why we see impact craters all around the world. However, if you'll think for a little bit about the almost infinite number of ways the billions of bits of debris in our system can approach Jupiter, the Sun, and Earth, you'll realize that the (relatively) small number of strikes is pretty incredible. Be very glad Jupiter is there, doing its job, or we probably wouldn't be here. On the other hand, Jupiter does occasionally disturb one of the "stable" asteroids in our system, and takes a "pot shot" at Earth... I suppose it's properly called after the fickle god that is its namesake.

If you really want to blow your mind, consider the fact that the plane of the planetary orbits is perpendicular to the direction the sun is traveling (very quickly) through the galaxy as it spins, making the planetary orbits (and all of the debris) look like this in three dimensional projection:

[Image: tumblr_mj0vvcqnZx1qdlh1io1_400.gif]

Fascinating stuff that motion of the sun. I had always assumed that the plane of the solar system was more or less the same as the galactic plane - now that you point this out, it makes sense that it doesn't have to be.

About the rarity of impacts. Part of it is surely also because space is really big, the rocks are relatively tiny and earth forms but a tiny gap in the arc traced by its orbit. Most of its orbit is devoid of itself at any given moment, if that makes sense.

We have to remember that what we observe is not nature herself, but nature exposed to our method of questioning ~ Werner Heisenberg
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10-07-2016, 05:30 PM
RE: Jupiter Question
(10-07-2016 07:28 AM)The Organic Chemist Wrote:  Cool gif, RS. Is it me or does it look like Jupiter is outside of Saturn?

LOL it does look like that. I was so mesmerized by the motion that I didn't even notice!

Might just be the angle... or somebody effed up.

"Theology made no provision for evolution. The biblical authors had missed the most important revelation of all! Could it be that they were not really privy to the thoughts of God?" - E. O. Wilson
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10-07-2016, 05:33 PM
RE: Jupiter Question
(10-07-2016 01:22 PM)tomilay Wrote:  Fascinating stuff that motion of the sun. I had always assumed that the plane of the solar system was more or less the same as the galactic plane - now that you point this out, it makes sense that it doesn't have to be.

According to Cornell's astronomy department, our the plane of our orbits are tipped roughly 63 degrees from the direction of the galaxy's rotation. It appears to be totally random what orientation a system will get, relative to the galaxy.

http://curious.astro.cornell.edu/about-u...termediate

"Theology made no provision for evolution. The biblical authors had missed the most important revelation of all! Could it be that they were not really privy to the thoughts of God?" - E. O. Wilson
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10-07-2016, 05:58 PM
RE: Jupiter Question
(10-07-2016 03:25 AM)Heywood Jahblome Wrote:  Another question to ponder is would you rather get hit from an average Kiper belt object or an average asteroid belt object?




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10-07-2016, 06:10 PM
RE: Jupiter Question
"Jupiter Question", he he, for a second I was thinking "The Jewish Question" and thought "What did Jupiter ever do to you?"

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10-07-2016, 06:27 PM
Jupiter Question
I'm glad that God put Jupiter there so it can catch the comets that he throws at us.
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10-07-2016, 07:27 PM
RE: Jupiter Question
(10-07-2016 01:22 PM)tomilay Wrote:  I had always assumed that the plane of the solar system was more or less the same as the galactic plane ...

That has to do to with our "up/down' thinking. It has to be tough for the astronauts on a space walk.

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11-07-2016, 12:06 AM
RE: Jupiter Question
(10-07-2016 06:24 AM)tomilay Wrote:  I am thinking there would be some clear cut calculus that one can point to that supports that view.

Play with this:

http://hermann.is/gravity/

Its fun!
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