Karl Richter
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26-08-2012, 04:53 AM (This post was last modified: 26-08-2012 04:57 AM by Vosur.)
Karl Richter
"Karl Richter (15 October 1926 – 15 February 1981) was a German conductor, organist, and harpsichordist. He was born in Plauen and studied first in Dresden, where he was a member of the Dresdner Kreuzchor and later in Leipzig, where he received his degree in 1949. He studied with Günther Ramin, Carl Straube and Rudolf Mauersberger. In the same year, he became organist at St. Thomas Church, Leipzig, where Johann Sebastian Bach once held the position as Musical Director. In 1951, he moved to Munich, where he taught at the conservatory and was cantor and organist at St. Mark's Church. He also conducted the Münchener Bach-Chor starting in 1954 and the Münchener Bach-Orchester. In the 1960s and 1970s, he did a great deal of recording and undertook tours to Japan, the United States, Canada, Latin America, Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karl_Richter_(conductor)

That being said, for anyone who is interested in classical music, I present to you this documentary about Karl Richter and his works (German voices with English subtitles). One thing became clear to me after watching it, he is my all-time favorite conductor. Heart



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26-08-2012, 07:17 AM
RE: Karl Richter
Wow!

Thanks for that.

(faster fingering than Japanese porn)

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26-08-2012, 08:15 AM (This post was last modified: 29-08-2012 08:48 PM by Bucky Ball.)
RE: Karl Richter
Cool. Thanks. Reminds me of "still waters run deep''.

Do you know if either one of those organs is St. Thomas ? That first one is really really old, and has a very odd pedal board. Have you ever played one of those old old tracker action instruments ? The action is actually mechanical, (not electrical), so they are really hard on your hands, and the stops are hard to reach, and pushing the key down actually pulls the lever, out from under the pipe, to let the air up. I have the action on my parents piano set to as light as it will go, so basically I look at the keys, and they play by themselves. I HATE actual tracker-action, and tracker-touch instruments.

Harpsicords always sound so "tinny" to me. As part of a group I guess that are ok for added "passing" harmonics, but they are so "busy" sounding. My teacher's (piano) teacher was in the line of Bach's students, so I guess I am too. I went through an organ phase. Now I would rather play in an ensemble, as a pianist. Organs are nice, but you have to deal with churches, and clergy to get in to use them. I was once told I had a great talent for the organ. I like to, (within the actual framework of the rhythm), anticipate the note by a few fractions of a second. It makes things sound very energetic. I can MAKE you want to stand up and sing something. I've been thinking about how to work on, and present some sort of "secular" hymns, as I think it's a shame that art form is ONLY associated with religion. The phrasing and rhythms are so "danceable"/musical. I have a friend who is into "gospel music", and another friend who, (she just graduated from high school), is going to be a great percussionist .. she is going to Julliard and do Tympani, mostly. Anyhow, we are trying to work out a way to introduce audience participation, concert "poems", or whatever set to hymn tunes, with no reference to deities. It has received some support, 'Symphonic Hymn Tunes", or something. Could be popular. We'll see. I only have a few from the "hoilday" season completed. They take a long long time to write out all the parts, descants, and orchestrations. We tried out a few with a choir, and orchestra, and a bunch of friends, and it worked great. We had a gospel choir, two soprano soloists, lots of percussion, (bongo drums, regular drums, 6 tympani, strings, woodwinds, brass, piano, and organ.) We rocked that place ! And not one mention of god(s). There is no reason all those great old tunes have to be dumped, just cuz they were first used in a religious context, and/or are only the property of religions.

Am sort of "wary" of Bach. Some stuff is really great, (the opening two movements of the Magnificat .. the BEST trumpet/cornet lines EVER written), a few of the Cantatas are "musical" to my ears, but so much is just plain b.o.r.i.n.g. .. There is a duet in a Cantata from the Christmas season, which I don't see right now, for double sopranao, usually done by, (maybe written for), a boy-choir. It hops along. It's my fav Jack Batch piece. Edit: I found it. I prefer an antiphonal boy choir .. but here it is :
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ujLK28Nlmq4

My fav organ piece is the F Major tocatta. The descending line in the pedal, (starts around 3:20), makes you want to sing with it. I double it, add a 32', if there is one, and use both feet. The problem is everybody plays it WAY too fast, and the "musical-ness" is just lost. I need to post one on YouTube just to "show em" how to do it. (heh heh .. arrogant much !) The descending line is so lyrical, and majestic, but everyone massacres it, instead of letting it sing. This one is by Marie-Claire Alain, the wife of the famous French composer Jehan Alain. She was THE best virtuoso from her day, I guess. (But I still think she plays this too fast, plus the pedal at the beginning is WAY too loud..you can barley hear the canon start, and if she would just slow down, and phrase it, it would be so much more musical).





I'm working on Diane Bish's arrangement of the tune from Bethoven's 9th symphony. I like her messing with rhythms. Am very skeptical of female organists. So many are so "mamby-pamby". I like firm energetic, rhythmic definition. This lady, (whom I hated when I first saw her), really has it, and I really respect her now.





I drove my poor family to distraction the summer I learned the Widor tocatta. If they could have locked me out, they would have. I cheat and not do the double sixteenths, and just do one 8th. I can't make my wrist flip that fast for some reason. It's actually some sort of "psych" block, as I can do it, my brain just doesn't want to allow it. Very odd.





Then I want to finish learning Marcel Dupre's Prelude and Fugue in B. (It's so hilarious. The pedal theme, is the SAME as the old US television show, "The Last of the Mohicans". heh heh ). Someone pointed that out, now I can't get it out of my head. This is a Cavaille-Coll, the greatest French organ maker, of all time. Most of the big Paris churches have organs he installed. They're not very "brilliant" (don't have many mixtures and overtones, like the German/Austrian/other European ones), but they are sort of "smooth", very "Romantic" era sounding. So humorous to see these Europen consoles which actaully mechanically "couple", (link) the keyboards, instead of modern day electrical couplers.





Then, before I die, I have to do Dieu Parmi Nous, (by Messiaen, and next to fucking impossible), The Liszt "Ad Nos, ad salutarem undam", (or whatever it's called), and the Prelude and Fugue on Alain. by Maurice Durufle, (very spooky), and the Roger-Ducasse "Pastorale"...almost done learning that. Fuck. :( Starts out so easy, and is the damn hardest thing I have ever played.)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fYPPVuG6bj4
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a1P9pvU_8...el&list=UL

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5OGDZDfSIgM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cbhyFVJP0wA
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HC6YzSzwluk

Need to do this also :
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=svtEckCaMRg

Somewhere on a tape I have myself doing the Mozart Fantasia in f minor. Boy, that was a bitch to learn. It was actually written for one of those mechanical (clock ?) devices, and he never expected anyone to actually "do" the notes, as they are written. I used to like it. Now, I'm not so sure. My teacher used to do such a fantastic job with it, maybe that's why I wanted to learn it. It's not all that musical. There is another mechanical fugue by him that's a real bitch, I should try someday.
(skip to the last 2 minutes)




So much for Bucky's organ music career.

I played this Messiaen thing in a concert once. We turned off the lights, and the lights were on in, inside the shuttered divisions. When the shutters opened the lights came through. It was so spooky. But I could not stop laughing. It was on a concert stage, so I had to behave. I almost didn't make it.





Oh BTW, Vosur..you are from Germany, right ? I'm looking for a copy of Joseph Kronsteiner's, (he used to be the choirmaster at the Cologne Cathedral), Krippen Messe. I need the whole ball of wax. The "Propers", the "Ordinary", the organ part, and the orchestra parts. I will pay for it. I want to use it. It combines many Austrian Carols, and I can't find it here. It's hauntingly beautiful.

Here's a couple more favs. The Dorian toccata is about the right tempo, but needs FAR more excitement and energy. It drives me crazy, they make it so broing.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2PhX3RwpfpA
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ncVblmduSQ

This trio sonata was a bitch, but got me into, and past my auditions.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-bs267MSa...re=related

Finally, a great old war-horse : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mm2eTylMB...re=related

There is a French Carillon Sortie, by Mullet, which has long places which have sextplets going in the right hand, and sixteenths in the left. The first time I saw it, I though "no way can my brain do two different rhythms at once". So I sat down, and thought, "well, there's no point practicing it, it's either gonna go or it won't" I can't explain it, but it just fell out, and happened. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gq8i69-L-Fs .
He wrote this too :
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TVwQZttmk...re=related

OK. I found a Frederick Swan hymn. He was at Riverside, then the Crystal Cathedral, and then LA. Even he is a little boring with this. Wow. Maybe I should have stayed in music ?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ToAwhhEOg...re=related

Insufferable know-it-all.Einstein Certified Ancient Astronaut Theorist
Isaiah 45:7 "I form the light, and create darkness: I make peace, and create evil: I the LORD do all these things" (KJV)

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26-08-2012, 02:10 PM
RE: Karl Richter
(26-08-2012 08:15 AM)Bucky Ball Wrote:  Cool. Thanks. Reminds me of "still waters run deep''.
You're welcome.

(26-08-2012 08:15 AM)Bucky Ball Wrote:  Do you know if either one of those organs is St. Thomas ?
Sorry Bucky, I have no idea.

(26-08-2012 08:15 AM)Bucky Ball Wrote:  That first one is really really old, and has a very odd pedal board. Have you ever played one of those old old tracker action instruments ? The action is actually mechanical, (not electrical), so they are really hard on your hands, and the stops are hard to reach, and pushing the key down actually pulls the lever, out from under the pipe, to let the air up. I have the action on my parents piano set to as light as it will go, so basically I look at the keys, and they play by themselves. I HATE actual tracker-action, and tracker-touch instruments.
I had the chance to play one of those in one of our local churches, however that was many years ago. The only instrument I am currently capable of playing is the piano, though I have stopped advancing my skills long ago.

(26-08-2012 08:15 AM)Bucky Ball Wrote:  So much for Bucky's organ music career.
I don't recall ever meeting someone at that age who is interested in playing an organ. I have to say that I'm impressed by your enthusiasm for music. I know I'm not even nearly as motivated, which is probably exactly why I stopped learning to play the piano.

(26-08-2012 08:15 AM)Bucky Ball Wrote:  Oh BTW, Vosur..you are from Germany, right ? I'm looking for a copy of Joseph Kronsteiner's, (he used to be the choirmaster at the Cologne Cathedral), Krippen Messe. I need the whole ball of wax. The "Propers", the "Ordinary", the organ part, and the orchestra parts. I will pay for it. I want to use it. It combines many Austrian Carols, and I can't find it here. It's hauntingly beautiful.
I think I know what you're looking for. Though I'm not sure if you can order it from your place.
http://www.di-arezzo.co.uk/sheet+music/c...f51&chdv=1

One last thing, you might like this version of Toccata and Fugue performed by Karl Richter.



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26-08-2012, 02:12 PM
RE: Karl Richter
(26-08-2012 08:15 AM)Bucky Ball Wrote:  I drove my poor family to distraction the summer I learned the Widor tocatta. If they could have locked me out, they would have. I cheat and not do the double sixteenths, and just do one 8th. I can't make my wrist flip that fast for some reason. It's actually some sort of "psych" block, as I can do it, my brain just doesn't want to allow it. Very odd.

Probably too much fappin'.


Or maybe not enough.


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