Kurt Gödel
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15-02-2014, 04:12 PM
Kurt Gödel
Kurt Gödel is one of the most genius logicians of all time. And he believed in afterlife and a personal god. What do you think about this?

Quote: In your last letter you pose the weighty question whether I believe we shall see each other again [in the hereafter]. About that I can only say the following: if the world is rationally organized and has a sense, then that must be so. For what sense would it make to bring for a being (man) who has such a wide range of possibilities of individual development and of relations to others and then allow him to achieve not one in a thousand of those? That would be much as if someone laid the foundation for a house with the greatest trouble and expense and then let everything go to ruin again. But do we have reason to assume that the world is rationally organized? I think so. For the world is not at all chaotic and capricious, but rather, as science shows, the greatest regularity and order prevails in all things; [and] order is but a form of rationality.



Now one can of course ask: Why didn’t God create man so that he does everything right immediately from the beginning?…But then if one of those characteristics is that we do not do everything right immediately, but many times only on the basis of experience, it follows that if God had created in our place beings that had nothing to learn, we just wouldn’t be those beings. That is, we wouldn’t exist at all.



One must in particular imagine that the “learning” will in large part take place only in the next world, namely in this way, that we will recall our experiences in this world and only then really understand them, so that our experiences here are, so to speak, only the raw material for the learning. For what, for example, could a cancer victim learn here from his pains? It is entirely conceivable, however, that in the second world it will be clear to him through what mistakes of his (not in hygienic matters, but perhaps in quite other respects) that sickness was caused, and that he thereby learns to understand not only that connection with his illness, but at the same time other similar connections.



The contemporary study of philosophy also doesn’t help much for understanding such questions, since 90% of contemporary philosophers see their principal task to be that of beating religion out of men’s heads.
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15-02-2014, 04:20 PM
RE: Kurt Gödel
Not much.
No one is an expert in everything.
Einstein made lots of mistakes.
http://discovermagazine.com/2008/sep/01-...v_oB4UsoUs

Insufferable know-it-all.Einstein
Those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music - Friedrich Nietzsche
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15-02-2014, 04:21 PM
RE: Kurt Gödel
His ontological "proof" never interested me.

This is what fascinates me about him:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G%C3%B6del%...s_theorems


Quote:Gödel's incompleteness theorems are two theorems of mathematical logic that establish inherent limitations of all but the most trivial axiomatic systems capable of doing arithmetic. The theorems, proven by Kurt Gödel in 1931, are important both in mathematical logic and in the philosophy of mathematics. The two results are widely, but not universally, interpreted as showing that Hilbert's program to find a complete and consistent set of axioms for all mathematics is impossible, giving a negative answer to Hilbert's second problem.

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15-02-2014, 04:21 PM
RE: Kurt Gödel



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15-02-2014, 04:23 PM
RE: Kurt Gödel
This still seems like wishful thinking to me. And it reminds me of the "what purpose do we have if there is no God?" argument.
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15-02-2014, 05:53 PM
RE: Kurt Gödel
(15-02-2014 04:12 PM)donotwant Wrote:  Kurt Gödel is one of the most genius logicians of all time. And he believed in afterlife and a personal god. What do you think about this?

That even geniuses are susceptible to wishful thinking.

His mathematical "proof of god" was little more than pretentious mental masturbation fundamentally devoid of meaning.

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15-02-2014, 09:16 PM
RE: Kurt Gödel
... you seriously started a whole thread to make one weaksauce hackneyed appeal to authority?

Isaac Newton invented calculus. And he was wrong as shit about pretty much everything else.

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15-02-2014, 09:26 PM
RE: Kurt Gödel
(15-02-2014 09:16 PM)cjlr Wrote:  ... you seriously started a whole thread to make one weaksauce hackneyed appeal to authority?

Isaac Newton invented calculus. And he was wrong as shit about pretty much everything else.

Yep, Isaac Newton is a classic example of the god of the gaps fallacy.

I think he did not know how all of the planets where aligned on the same plane or how they all went about an axis so he used god which conveniently ''answered'' the question. Correct me if I'm wrong here.

In case anyone doesn't know.. Isaac Newtons questions I posed above have now been answered. We have a very easy understanding of all of this and it's all very natural, no superstitious monkey involved!

He also predicted that the world would end in 2060, of the many things he was right about, I'm glad he's going to be wrong about that!

Everyday is judgement day. Use your judgement, use reason.
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15-02-2014, 11:48 PM
RE: Kurt Gödel
(15-02-2014 04:12 PM)donotwant Wrote:  Kurt Gödel is one of the most genius logicians of all time. And he believed in afterlife and a personal god. What do you think about this?

I think he was like so many others who proceeded him, and so many since - brainwashed from childhood to believe in invisible magic people, and unable to give that childish nonsense up, in spite of otherwise being brilliant and rational.

Softly, softly, catchee monkey.
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16-02-2014, 03:14 AM
RE: Kurt Gödel
(15-02-2014 04:21 PM)The Germans are coming Wrote:  His ontological "proof" never interested me.

This is what fascinates me about him:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G%C3%B6del%...s_theorems


Quote:Gödel's incompleteness theorems are two theorems of mathematical logic that establish inherent limitations of all but the most trivial axiomatic systems capable of doing arithmetic. The theorems, proven by Kurt Gödel in 1931, are important both in mathematical logic and in the philosophy of mathematics. The two results are widely, but not universally, interpreted as showing that Hilbert's program to find a complete and consistent set of axioms for all mathematics is impossible, giving a negative answer to Hilbert's second problem.

Seems really strange that with this approach, Gödel wanted to insist that there was a 'completeness' called God who would part the clouds and [thank you Jonathan Miller for this image] tell us all 'don't worry - it's all REALLY ok and in my plan'.

Obviously Gödel was *not* the messiah .... Moodie x
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