Lawsuit for allowing prayer
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16-08-2015, 02:03 AM
RE: Lawsuit for allowing prayer
There is an Australian film called The man who sued God.

Check it out. Billy Connelly stars in it.

It's take a freaking fortune to sue all the churches.




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16-08-2015, 07:47 AM
RE: Lawsuit for allowing prayer
(16-08-2015 02:03 AM)Banjo Wrote:  There is an Australian film called The man who sued God.

Check it out. Billy Connelly stars in it.

It's take a freaking fortune to sue all the churches.




That looks pretty funny. Is it any good?

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16-08-2015, 08:15 AM
RE: Lawsuit for allowing prayer
All public events should remain secular otherwise the prayers which are accepted as being Christian are discriminating against other religions. Either the prayer includes all the religions in their languages or none at all.
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16-08-2015, 08:26 AM
RE: Lawsuit for allowing prayer
(16-08-2015 07:47 AM)TarzanSmith Wrote:  
(16-08-2015 02:03 AM)Banjo Wrote:  There is an Australian film called The man who sued God.

Check it out. Billy Connelly stars in it.

It's take a freaking fortune to sue all the churches.




That looks pretty funny. Is it any good?

Yes, it's not bad. Nothing Oscar worthy but good solid performances etc....... and Billy Connelly. Big Grin
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16-08-2015, 08:52 AM
RE: Lawsuit for allowing prayer
(16-08-2015 01:57 AM)Stevil Wrote:  
(15-08-2015 05:01 PM)microterf Wrote:  If you believe that intercessory prayer works, then you have to acknowledge that it could give an unfair advantage to a team or player that is being prayed for.
But it depends on their belief. They may not believe that they can pray for a win. They may believe that they can pray for other things, like determinations, courage etc. Most smart religious leaders will never make claims that can be statistically proven.

You are correct. I'm talking about fundamentalists who do make the claims of intercessory prayer working. I've heard pastors make specific claims, and know there are many more. That is my target. People can have irrational beliefs, and that's not a huge deal. People who look at prayer for what it is, a meditation of sorts, tend to be a little more rational and just like to "feel comforted"

Remember, just because you want something to be true, doesn't make it true. Yes, even if you have faith.
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16-08-2015, 01:47 PM
RE: Lawsuit for allowing prayer
(16-08-2015 08:52 AM)microterf Wrote:  You are correct. I'm talking about fundamentalists who do make the claims of intercessory prayer working. I've heard pastors make specific claims, and know there are many more. That is my target. People can have irrational beliefs, and that's not a huge deal. People who look at prayer for what it is, a meditation of sorts, tend to be a little more rational and just like to "feel comforted"
Innocent until proven guilty, right?

You would have to prove that they created a binding contract with their god (via prayer) to fix the game. You would also have to prove that their god did in fact have the means and intent to interfere with the game.

Let's say I was a bit odd and video taped myself wishing to my pillow that my favourite team would win a game. Do you think this video tape would be sufficient to incriminate me in fixing a game? Even if, under oath, I told people that I believed wishes to my pillow sometimes come true?
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16-08-2015, 10:15 PM
RE: Lawsuit for allowing prayer
(16-08-2015 01:47 PM)Stevil Wrote:  
(16-08-2015 08:52 AM)microterf Wrote:  You are correct. I'm talking about fundamentalists who do make the claims of intercessory prayer working. I've heard pastors make specific claims, and know there are many more. That is my target. People can have irrational beliefs, and that's not a huge deal. People who look at prayer for what it is, a meditation of sorts, tend to be a little more rational and just like to "feel comforted"
Innocent until proven guilty, right?

You would have to prove that they created a binding contract with their god (via prayer) to fix the game. You would also have to prove that their god did in fact have the means and intent to interfere with the game.

Let's say I was a bit odd and video taped myself wishing to my pillow that my favourite team would win a game. Do you think this video tape would be sufficient to incriminate me in fixing a game? Even if, under oath, I told people that I believed wishes to my pillow sometimes come true?

Hrrrrm.

Actually, the "prove it" might not be necessary.

Two possible paths. First, you can try to get the opposing side to STIPULATE to the "fact" that prayer can alter the outcome of the game. In a civil suit, stipulation by both parties amounts to the matter being proven. If they refuse to stipulate, hammer them in public on the subject.

Second, you can try to prove that they BELIEVE they were affecting the outcome, and admit as many public statements of theirs on the subject of intercessory prayer as possible to that end. Here they're not in trouble for ACTUALLY rigging the game, but just ATTEMPTING to do it. Leagues may have enforced sportsmanship rules that make even an attempt to cheat actionable, no matter how credible the attempt was.

Remember, you don't have to win the lawsuit to win the gambit. Them going on record under oath saying that intercessory prayer doesn't work is also a win.

All in all, it's an amusing thought experiment, but I think it's awful tactics. I'd rather change minds than take religion away by governmental fiat. Don't sue them. Just bring it up next time you encounter someone praying for their team to win. "Hey, knock it off. I'd like a fair game without any outside force rigging the outcome." Discussion ensues.
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17-08-2015, 12:21 AM
RE: Lawsuit for allowing prayer
I somehow don't think that is going to work. It is a really funny idea though.


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17-08-2015, 12:52 AM
RE: Lawsuit for allowing prayer
(14-08-2015 06:29 AM)microterf Wrote:  Sue a professional sports organization (NFL/MLB/NBA etc) for not protecting the integrity of the game by not specifically banning prayer. Being the plaintiff, we would then subpoena many of the top fundamentalist pastors/preachers who have stated that prayer works in creating miracles.

Individuals and corporations are not liable for acts of God.

Since praying is not against the rules, it is permissible by all teams and their fans. No team has a monopoly on prayer so it is not an unfair advantage to any team. If you could sue the NFL for this, you could sue teams that allow their players to talk smack to the opposing team. Or you could sue teams whose fans make more noise when the visiting team is on offense, etc.

Making this complaint would only make atheists look stupid and petty and to be honest, you have enough atheists here making the rest of you look stupid and petty.
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17-08-2015, 12:59 AM
RE: Lawsuit for allowing prayer
(17-08-2015 12:52 AM)Heywood Jahblome Wrote:  
(14-08-2015 06:29 AM)microterf Wrote:  Sue a professional sports organization (NFL/MLB/NBA etc) for not protecting the integrity of the game by not specifically banning prayer. Being the plaintiff, we would then subpoena many of the top fundamentalist pastors/preachers who have stated that prayer works in creating miracles.

Individuals and corporations are not liable for acts of God.

Since praying is not against the rules, it is permissible by all teams and their fans. No team has a monopoly on prayer so it is not an unfair advantage to any team. If you could sue the NFL for this, you could sue teams that allow their players to talk smack to the opposing team. Or you could sue teams whose fans make more noise when the visiting team is on offense, etc.

Making this complaint would only make atheists look stupid and petty and to be honest, you have enough atheists here making the rest of you look stupid and petty.

You are mistaken. Atheists here are clever and pretty. Stop projecting.

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(06-02-2014 03:47 PM)Momsurroundedbyboys Wrote:  And I'm giving myself a conclusion again from all the facepalming.
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