Learning To Kick Ass
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26-01-2017, 02:23 PM (This post was last modified: 26-01-2017 02:26 PM by evil_live.)
Learning To Kick Ass
Anyone do boxing, kickboxing, muay thai, wrestling, sambo, bjj, judo, and etc? I was reading this article on The Best Fighting Styles To Kick Anyone’s Ass and thinking of joining a class soon. And no, not because I want to kick peoples ass. I don't go around wanting to fight or pick fights. Doing more to learn something that I think is cool and as another form of fitness for myself.

I found a nice gym by my area that those both BJJ and MMA. I'm guessing the MMA class will be a mixture of different arts? Anyways this had me wondering if anyone here did any kind of martial arts and what their experience was.
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26-01-2017, 02:29 PM
RE: Learning To Kick Ass
You'll find it nearly impossible to kick a really big guy's ass ---

but,

With a bit of practice - you can probably out-run them....

Big Grin

.......................................

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26-01-2017, 02:31 PM
RE: Learning To Kick Ass
I did some Krav Maga classes a couple of years ago and really enjoyed it, but I hurt my back (unrelated to KM or the classes) and couldn't continue.
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26-01-2017, 03:20 PM
RE: Learning To Kick Ass
Dabbled in a few different martial arts over the course of my life including Aikido, Sanshou / Sanda, BJJ, Krav Maga, and Army Combatives if that counts. Currently studying BJJ through a Renzo Gracie affiliate in Ottawa and also jump into a Krav Maga class every now and then.

(26-01-2017 02:23 PM)evil_live Wrote:  I found a nice gym by my area that those both BJJ and MMA. I'm guessing the MMA class will be a mixture of different arts?

MMA is a mixture of grappling and striking. More data driven than most traditional martial arts, but within a context usually limited to the rules of the sport of MMA.

If you're looking to legitimately learn how to fight (whether to kick people's asses or to defend yourself Tongue), I'd steer clear of most westernized traditional martial arts. Regardless of what that article says, most Aikido, JKD, and Karate self proclaimed masters couldn't fight their way out of a paper bag. Boxing, Kickboxing / Muay Thai, BJJ, and MMA are limited to the rules as set by the sports towards which they are geared, but at least what is taught is based on data and not "Sure, it worked a hundred years ago. We can't prove it, just trust us." Krav Maga schools can go either way. It's concept is practical, and the fact that it's newer has resulted in less time for that concept to have been diluted by the time it reaches your average westernized McDojo. Some instructors know what they're doing, others are just regurgitating what someone else told them without having ever put it to real use.

Edit: Also, don't underestimate the white people arts like Greco-Roman wrestling.

'Murican Canadian
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26-01-2017, 03:55 PM
RE: Learning To Kick Ass
I really like Krav Maga. I think whatever you decide to take, make sure you really like your instructor. My instructor is amazing and does not treat me like a girl. He treats me like one of the guys and pushes me just as hard. The reason I mention this is that in high school, I took a few karate classes and felt the instructor "babied" the women. Not the case in my current classes Tongue

"Let the waters settle and you will see the moon and stars mirrored in your own being." -Rumi
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26-01-2017, 04:43 PM
RE: Learning To Kick Ass
(26-01-2017 02:29 PM)onlinebiker Wrote:  You'll find it nearly impossible to kick a really big guy's ass ---

but,

With a bit of practice - you can probably out-run them....

Big Grin

Haha, they do have weight classes for a reason. Tongue
I'll be sure to focus on my cardio for that reason alone.

(26-01-2017 02:31 PM)Heath_Tierney Wrote:  I did some Krav Maga classes a couple of years ago and really enjoyed it, but I hurt my back (unrelated to KM or the classes) and couldn't continue.

My one friend did Krav Maga and he loved it. I was thinking about it but I couldn't find one close to where I live. Sorry to hear about your back. Sad

(26-01-2017 03:20 PM)yakherder Wrote:  Dabbled in a few different martial arts over the course of my life including Aikido, Sanshou / Sanda, BJJ, Krav Maga, and Army Combatives if that counts. Currently studying BJJ through a Renzo Gracie affiliate in Ottawa and also jump into a Krav Maga class every now and then.

(26-01-2017 02:23 PM)evil_live Wrote:  I found a nice gym by my area that those both BJJ and MMA. I'm guessing the MMA class will be a mixture of different arts?

MMA is a mixture of grappling and striking. More data driven than most traditional martial arts, but within a context usually limited to the rules of the sport of MMA.

If you're looking to legitimately learn how to fight (whether to kick people's asses or to defend yourself Tongue), I'd steer clear of most westernized traditional martial arts. Regardless of what that article says, most Aikido, JKD, and Karate self proclaimed masters couldn't fight their way out of a paper bag. Boxing, Kickboxing / Muay Thai, BJJ, and MMA are limited to the rules as set by the sports towards which they are geared, but at least what is taught is based on data and not "Sure, it worked a hundred years ago. We can't prove it, just trust us." Krav Maga schools can go either way. It's concept is practical, and the fact that it's newer has resulted in less time for that concept to have been diluted by the time it reaches your average westernized McDojo. Some instructors know what they're doing, others are just regurgitating what someone else told them without having ever put it to real use.

Edit: Also, don't underestimate the white people arts like Greco-Roman wrestling.

Damn, that's a bit a of a shocking news to read about. I was leaning towards BJJ a lot because of how universal it felt. But you're right on how these arts are mostly made for a fixed environment. I wish I had wrestling in high school or in any school I attended. I guess I'll just pick on and pray to god I never end up in a fight situation.

(26-01-2017 03:55 PM)jennybee Wrote:  I really like Krav Maga. I think whatever you decide to take, make sure you really like your instructor. My instructor is amazing and does not treat me like a girl. He treats me like one of the guys and pushes me just as hard. The reason I mention this is that in high school, I took a few karate classes and felt the instructor "babied" the women. Not the case in my current classes Tongue

Good point! I'm going to definitely take advantage of the trial classes to get a feel for the gyms I'm looking at. I can't imagine how it would feel to be babied in a combat sport class.. Seems like you're being cheated out of the full experience. Hope I find an instructor like yours! Smile
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26-01-2017, 05:05 PM
RE: Learning To Kick Ass
Don't get me wrong. BJJ is awesome. Just be aware of its drawbacks if you choose to put it to use in a real fight. Namely, the fact that a real fight has the potential to change from one on one to two on one while you're tied up on the ground.

'Murican Canadian
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27-01-2017, 04:52 PM
RE: Learning To Kick Ass
(26-01-2017 05:05 PM)yakherder Wrote:  Don't get me wrong. BJJ is awesome. Just be aware of its drawbacks if you choose to put it to use in a real fight. Namely, the fact that a real fight has the potential to change from one on one to two on one while you're tied up on the ground.

That's very true. I think that's why majority of any martial arts say to avoid at fight at all costs and to only fight if you have no other options. Too many factors can happen in a street fight, right?

Definitely going to be looking into BJJ though. Found one that does both sports BJJ and self-defence BJJ. Smile
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27-01-2017, 05:25 PM
Learning To Kick Ass
If you want to learn how to take someone out, find a style of Koryu Bujutsu.
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27-01-2017, 08:59 PM
RE: Learning To Kick Ass
(27-01-2017 04:52 PM)evil_live Wrote:  
(26-01-2017 05:05 PM)yakherder Wrote:  Don't get me wrong. BJJ is awesome. Just be aware of its drawbacks if you choose to put it to use in a real fight. Namely, the fact that a real fight has the potential to change from one on one to two on one while you're tied up on the ground.

That's very true. I think that's why majority of any martial arts say to avoid at fight at all costs and to only fight if you have no other options. Too many factors can happen in a street fight, right?

Definitely going to be looking into BJJ though. Found one that does both sports BJJ and self-defence BJJ. Smile

If it's only your own ass on the line, then yeah your best bet is generally to avoid the fight and, if it happens, fight yourself free then disengage and run. That's not only the best way to stay safe, but also the most likely to protect you legally. If you stomp someone into the ground, you'd better be able to explain to a jury (probably composed of jurors who've never been in a fight before) how it was absolutely necessary. Obviously, if it's someone else you're trying to protect then that might not be an option.

But all that aside, the biggest difference is time and predictability. In combat sports, you generally have the option to take your time, feel out your opponent, develop a plan, etc. You also know there aren't going to be any surprises. In a real fight, it not only tends to happen without warning but you don't know anything about your opponent, you don't know if they have friends waiting to jump you from behind, you don't know if they've got a knife in their pocket.

There's a cliché that pretty much everyone in the military knows. A fight is won by speed, surprise, and violence of action. If, for whatever reason, you decide you're going to take someone out, your best chance of coming out ahead is:

1. Making them believe you have no intention of fighting, right up until the second you launch your attack.
2. Don't screw around. Once the time for diplomacy is passed, go from peacemaker to grim reaper in half a second and don't let up until the threat has been neutralized.
3. Make it fast and brutal. This will not only throw your opponent into a state of temporary shock and disarray, often long enough for you to win the fight, but it can suck the will out of their friends that might be thinking about jumping in.
And once you and whoever you are trying to protect are safe, get the hell out of there before they recover or their friends regain their composure.

Another thing is what is often referred to as spiritual fitness. The term is obviously not an accurate reflection of my way of thinking as an atheist, but the state of mind it represents is relevant nonetheless. If you're going to be the type of person that acts in such situations, you need to be psychologically prepared for the possibility of failure. You might die or, even if you win, you might go to jail. So don't do it unless it's worth it and, ideally, make that decision before the situation actually occurs.

But back to the martial arts discussion...

What you can take away from BJJ that will always be useful is a solid understanding of how to control someone on the ground. The difference is that in a real fight, once you gain control, you either snap the limb to create an opportunity for you to escape or end the fight (as opposed to going for a submission), or you disengage and get out of there once you have enough control to do so. Army Combatives is based heavily on BJJ ground control concepts, except instead of teaching submission they teach us to establish enough control so that we can get to our sidearm or, at the very least, keep it out of reach from them, and in the meantime be calling for help. Another popular saying is "The winner is whoever's buddy shows up first."

'Murican Canadian
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