Learning languages
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26-07-2015, 03:19 AM
Learning languages
Is there anyone with advice for learning languages? I am teaching myself.

I also noticed we don't have an education or language section.

“[Science] works! Planes fly. Cars drive. Computers compute. If you base medicine on science, you cure people. If you base the design of planes on science, they fly. If you base the design of rockets on science, they reach the moon. It works...bitches.” - Richie D Da Illest
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26-07-2015, 03:28 AM (This post was last modified: 26-07-2015 03:33 AM by DLJ.)
RE: Learning languages
Vad säger du? Jag är ledsen, jag talar inte svenska

Blush

Actually, I shouldn't really offer advice as I can only speak 2 languages (English and Gibberish) but regarding learning in general, it's all about repetition.

Every time you read it or say it you make another copy in your brain.

Every time you read it or say it you make another copy in your brain.

Every time you read it or say it you make another copy in your brain.

Thanks to Dan Dennett for that one ... he's talking about meme replication. And obviously words (in whichever language) are memes.

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26-07-2015, 05:38 AM
RE: Learning languages
My advice is Rosetta stone. Bite the bullet and pay the $.

**Crickets** -- God
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26-07-2015, 06:13 AM (This post was last modified: 26-07-2015 06:18 AM by yakherder.)
RE: Learning languages
I'm a language nerd and I'll write up my method that I've fine tuned over the past 15 years when I really started to get into language learning, but I'll wait until tonight when I can get on my laptop and not try to write an essay on my phone Tongue

In the meantime, here's what you need:
• Anki - http://ankisrs.net/ - a free, multi media capable flash card program that automatically syncs between your computer and smartphone, and reviews cards based on a more scientifically valid system of memorization than simply going through the cards like you would with actual flashcards.

• A keyboard input method for the language you want to learn. Most of the time Microsoft's language settings has one that is sufficient. I've only really had to go 3rd party for more obscure languages, like Chipewyan, which I'm learning for my work up in Northwest Territories, or if I want to be able to use romanization as a pronunciation guide alongside characters, such as with Chinese.

• Audacity - because even the most overpriced software is usually inefficient, but with simple audio editing software you can still make use of any dialogues you can find either in language software or at countless other places online or from movies and other media.

• Decent MP3 player software. You need to be able to have a large playlist, with possibly several hundred items, and play it completely randomized.

• Skype - so you can practice with actual people if you're not in an exceptionally diverse environment.

Sometime today or tonight I'll give you the details on how to put all that to use and learn a language very quickly.

'Murican Canadian
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26-07-2015, 07:05 AM
RE: Learning languages
The best retention occurs when you hear it, see it, say it, and write it at the same time. You may feel stupid sitting there staring at a pic while listening to a recording and saying something out loud while writing, but you will retain things much better in a shorter time.

It also helps to watch the news in the new language, as well as any kid's programming. You will pick out enough words to make general sense of it and learn the way kids do.

Some people need grammar analysis first to properly use grammar, others do better learning expressions and sentences as a unit and looking at the grammar only after these are committed to memory. Find out which suits you.

Rosetta Stone et al do work. Supplement as outlined above.

The more time you spend in the other language the better you learn. Total immersion is best, but tiring and often not possible.

[Image: dobie.png]Science is the process we've designed to be responsible for generating our best guess as to what the fuck is going on. Girly Man
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26-07-2015, 08:59 AM
RE: Learning languages
I learnt Spanish in Spain. My girlfriend didn't speak a lick of English, nor I Spanish, so I bought an English/Spanish dictionary. We'd tussle over it -- whoever had the dictionary had the floor.

I know it's not very helpful, but I guess the point is that motivation can be important, and immersion helpful.
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26-07-2015, 10:01 AM
RE: Learning languages
(26-07-2015 05:38 AM)Tonechaser77 Wrote:  My advice is Rosetta stone. Bite the bullet and pay the $.

Actually I wouldn't. I bought Rosetta Stone and it really isn't that good compared to other free tools now. Memrise.com is one, another is duolingo.com Most people don't really rate Rosetta Stone it seems.

I spent my first three months in Germany using Rosetta Stone and not really feeling like I was making any progress. The problem was that there are just so many words that you have to learn in a new language. You'll need 1,000 just to have a chance to communicate, 5,000 to reach the level of someone who is poorly educated. So I used memrise to build up my vocabulary. And there is no way around it, it just takes time to learn these words.

Memrise used to be really amazing when it first came out but every update they mess it up a little bit more. But then they brought out the IOS and Android version and I started using it again.

When Memrise really messed up their website but before they brought out their mobile versions I started using Anki instead. That's a free program that you can use for learning anything. Both are developed around the idea of virtual flashcards for rote learning. Memrise is better though because the community create memes to help you remember the words. I currently have 4,915 words.
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26-07-2015, 10:24 AM
Learning languages
(26-07-2015 10:01 AM)Mathilda Wrote:  
(26-07-2015 05:38 AM)Tonechaser77 Wrote:  My advice is Rosetta stone. Bite the bullet and pay the $.

Actually I wouldn't. I bought Rosetta Stone and it really isn't that good compared to other free tools now. Memrise.com is one, another is duolingo.com Most people don't really rate Rosetta Stone it seems.

I spent my first three months in Germany using Rosetta Stone and not really feeling like I was making any progress. The problem was that there are just so many words that you have to learn in a new language. You'll need 1,000 just to have a chance to communicate, 5,000 to reach the level of someone who is poorly educated. So I used memrise to build up my vocabulary. And there is no way around it, it just takes time to learn these words.

Memrise used to be really amazing when it first came out but every update they mess it up a little bit more. But then they brought out the IOS and Android version and I started using it again.

When Memrise really messed up their website but before they brought out their mobile versions I started using Anki instead. That's a free program that you can use for learning anything. Both are developed around the idea of virtual flashcards for rote learning. Memrise is better though because the community create memes to help you remember the words. I currently have 4,915 words.

It probably depends on the person. I used Rosetta Stone to learn French before I went to Europe 8 years ago. I felt it was an excellent way to learn. I learned quickly, which I would denote was not to my ability, but to the course.

I've also known several people who have had the same experience as me. That obviously doesn't mean everyone will, which you have stated, but from my small sampling of users, you are the first person I have come across to form a negative opinion of the product.

**Crickets** -- God
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26-07-2015, 11:09 AM
RE: Learning languages
I'd suggest DuoLingo over Rosetta Stone, because it's free, and it actually teaches you conjugation rules, instead of leaving you to figure them out on your own.

If we came from dust, then why is there still dust?
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26-07-2015, 11:31 AM
RE: Learning languages
I would recommend you learn some Latin. It's pretty intuitive, and could be fun in a class. Then I'd say take French. I'm about to start learning Italian with a Paisano friend. I see many similarities.

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