Makers fairs
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23-08-2016, 11:37 PM
Makers fairs
Maybe not science exactly but could, hopefully, include scientific ieas as well as technology and skill.

Is there anyone here who has any experience in organising, participating, visiting or just having anecdotes or an opinion regarding such a fair?

We have only one or two in England and I am considering approaching the city council with a proposal for on in Gloucester. I am at the stage of just gathering stuff for a presentation of some sort - before polling the local schools and tbe public to gauge interest or companies to provide support or sponsorship.

Being optimistic here, could take two years to set up and I have to consider my rather dickey ticker . . . but the itch won't go away!

Tomorrow is precious, don't ruin it by fouling up today.
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24-08-2016, 05:11 AM
RE: Makers fairs
Looking at the title, I thought it's about a new type of bourbon whiskey. Smile

Is it like one of those things where you have people displaying all sorts of gadgets?

We have to remember that what we observe is not nature herself, but nature exposed to our method of questioning ~ Werner Heisenberg
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24-08-2016, 05:21 AM (This post was last modified: 24-08-2016 05:24 AM by Gloucester.)
RE: Makers fairs
(24-08-2016 05:11 AM)tomilay Wrote:  Looking at the title, I thought it's about a new type of bourbon whiskey. Smile

Is it like one of those things where you have people displaying all sorts of gadgets?

That is the idea.

Maybe just people just (rightfully) showing off, others looking for crowd funding or sales, maybe companies looking for stuff to buy the rights of or for inovative people.

Schools can show how they are promoting technology, or even "commercialising" stuff they can make on a 3D printer for example.

I will be sitting down this pm to brainstorm the idea before my head explodes! Then I have to do some sort of postable presentation for the local councils, companies and media to gather support. Any suggestions or questions from here will be part of that process. You have already triggered four ideas, tomilay, just by making me answer your question!

Thanks.

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24-08-2016, 05:31 AM
RE: Makers fairs
(24-08-2016 05:21 AM)Gloucester Wrote:  
(24-08-2016 05:11 AM)tomilay Wrote:  Looking at the title, I thought it's about a new type of bourbon whiskey. Smile

Is it like one of those things where you have people displaying all sorts of gadgets?

That is the idea.

Maybe just people just (rightfully) showing off, others looking for crowd funding or sales, maybe companies looking for stuff to buy the rights of or for inovative people.

Schools can show how they are promoting technology, or even "commercialising" stuff they can make on a 3D printer for example.

I will be sitting down this pm to brainstorm the idea before my head explodes! Then I have to do some sort of postable presentation for the local councils, companies and media to gather support. Any suggestions or questions from here will be part of that process. You have already triggered four ideas, tomilay, just by making me answer your question!

Thanks.

I have always understood that one of the things what made tiny England the main cog in the industrial revolution was the opening up of the innovative space for the masses. And steam. People could make gadgets with steam. They would get wealthy sponsors. Empirical scientists became salaried. The rest is history.

We have to remember that what we observe is not nature herself, but nature exposed to our method of questioning ~ Werner Heisenberg
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24-08-2016, 06:40 AM (This post was last modified: 24-08-2016 06:44 AM by Gloucester.)
RE: Makers fairs
(24-08-2016 05:31 AM)tomilay Wrote:  
(24-08-2016 05:21 AM)Gloucester Wrote:  That is the idea.

Maybe just people just (rightfully) showing off, others looking for crowd funding or sales, maybe companies looking for stuff to buy the rights of or for inovative people.

Schools can show how they are promoting technology, or even "commercialising" stuff they can make on a 3D printer for example.

I will be sitting down this pm to brainstorm the idea before my head explodes! Then I have to do some sort of postable presentation for the local councils, companies and media to gather support. Any suggestions or questions from here will be part of that process. You have already triggered four ideas, tomilay, just by making me answer your question!

Thanks.

I have always understood that one of the things what made tiny England the main cog in the industrial revolution was the opening up of the innovative space for the masses. And steam. People could make gadgets with steam. They would get wealthy sponsors. Empirical scientists became salaried. The rest is history.

Yup, most science has become very expensive The height of excitement and striving for knowledge and inventions of the Industrial Revolution and the Victorian age has been almost wholly sunk. People are still inventing in their living rooms, but not quite do much on this sjde of the pond from the Youtube crowd funding videos.

The Internet and games culture has possibly reduced the number if kids doing practical hobbies or just experimenting like I did. The local school closed its evening clubs due to lack of interest.

A few TV progs try with Robot Wars and the occassional, "Let"s see what happens when we microwave a paint can half full of petrol," type experiment. Great, and they sometimes explain what happened, but not in my backyard please! Also the "Scrap Yard Challenge" is good at sparking interest.

STEM and fun science shows also help, but I think it needs an open-to-all show, for participation and viewing, for a few days in local venues.

And there's another eight points and ideas in my mind from this reply alone!

Hey, this works!

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24-08-2016, 09:31 AM
RE: Makers fairs
(24-08-2016 06:40 AM)Gloucester Wrote:  
(24-08-2016 05:31 AM)tomilay Wrote:  I have always understood that one of the things what made tiny England the main cog in the industrial revolution was the opening up of the innovative space for the masses. And steam. People could make gadgets with steam. They would get wealthy sponsors. Empirical scientists became salaried. The rest is history.

Yup, most science has become very expensive The height of excitement and striving for knowledge and inventions of the Industrial Revolution and the Victorian age has been almost wholly sunk. People are still inventing in their living rooms, but not quite do much on this sjde of the pond from the Youtube crowd funding videos.

The Internet and games culture has possibly reduced the number if kids doing practical hobbies or just experimenting like I did. The local school closed its evening clubs due to lack of interest.

A few TV progs try with Robot Wars and the occassional, "Let"s see what happens when we microwave a paint can half full of petrol," type experiment. Great, and they sometimes explain what happened, but not in my backyard please! Also the "Scrap Yard Challenge" is good at sparking interest.

STEM and fun science shows also help, but I think it needs an open-to-all show, for participation and viewing, for a few days in local venues.

And there's another eight points and ideas in my mind from this reply alone!

Hey, this works!

My guess is a lot of potentially consequential tinkerers have wound up in well paying careers, promoted to senior management. A nice office. Deadlines. Fetching secretary. A not too shabby portfolio. Among other trappings associated with doing well in this century. Rare is the boss that tinkers. That tinkering threatens to go the way of the dodo is not a notion entirely without basis.

We are at the moment firmly anchored on the discoveries that happened at the turn of the last century. The early 1900s.

We have to remember that what we observe is not nature herself, but nature exposed to our method of questioning ~ Werner Heisenberg
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24-08-2016, 09:59 AM
RE: Makers fairs
(24-08-2016 09:31 AM)tomilay Wrote:  
(24-08-2016 06:40 AM)Gloucester Wrote:  Yup, most science has become very expensive The height of excitement and striving for knowledge and inventions of the Industrial Revolution and the Victorian age has been almost wholly sunk. People are still inventing in their living rooms, but not quite do much on this sjde of the pond from the Youtube crowd funding videos.

The Internet and games culture has possibly reduced the number if kids doing practical hobbies or just experimenting like I did. The local school closed its evening clubs due to lack of interest.

A few TV progs try with Robot Wars and the occassional, "Let"s see what happens when we microwave a paint can half full of petrol," type experiment. Great, and they sometimes explain what happened, but not in my backyard please! Also the "Scrap Yard Challenge" is good at sparking interest.

STEM and fun science shows also help, but I think it needs an open-to-all show, for participation and viewing, for a few days in local venues.

And there's another eight points and ideas in my mind from this reply alone!

Hey, this works!

My guess is a lot of potentially consequential tinkerers have wound up in well paying careers, promoted to senior management. A nice office. Deadlines. Fetching secretary. A not too shabby portfolio. Among other trappings associated with doing well in this century. Rare is the boss that tinkers. That tinkering threatens to go the way of the dodo is not a notion entirely without basis.

We are at the moment firmly anchored on the discoveries that happened at the turn of the last century. The early 1900s.

Can't agree with some if that, though many innovative people have been sucked into the system, the establishment or fallen for the root of all evil. The "real" inmovators just want to be in the labor workshop. I turned down promotion because it would have changed my job dramatically. Actually would not have paid much more.

Not sure what your last sentence means, there are fundamentals that we can't improve on much. Removing metals, say, has moved on from carving chunks off with sharp tools and loads of mechanical effort, we now have laser and plasma cutting, plus "water lasers" cutting stone, plastics etc.

3D printing is beginning to take over from casting and other ancient techniques.

There's a whole thread worth in comparing old and new. Even without touching on medical equipment.

Tomorrow is precious, don't ruin it by fouling up today.
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24-08-2016, 10:02 AM
RE: Makers fairs
I started looking into Maker Faires as a way to get my children more interested in STEM related activities. It seemed like great fun for kids, till I looked closer and realized it wasn't actually a cool gadgets to make but more of a group for people with shit tons of $ to spend on robotics, 3D printers and computers.

maybe I'm wrong, but that was my impression of it.


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24-08-2016, 11:06 AM (This post was last modified: 24-08-2016 11:09 AM by Gloucester.)
RE: Makers fairs
(24-08-2016 10:02 AM)Bows and Arrows Wrote:  I started looking into Maker Faires as a way to get my children more interested in STEM related activities. It seemed like great fun for kids, till I looked closer and realized it wasn't actually a cool gadgets to make but more of a group for people with shit tons of $ to spend on robotics, 3D printers and computers.

maybe I'm wrong, but that was my impression of it.

Know what you mean. But good point, needs "classes" for entries. At the moment I don't think we have the spread of techonology at home this side of the Pond. Cost is a big factor, a $300 3D printer price tab translates to £300. Same happens with a lot of other stuff. There are £200 3D printers now, hobby level for some - I have spent much more than that much on a camera.

Watching videos from various locations the tone does vary somewhat.

Room in the house is also a problem, there are few houses not in terraces round here, no room if you have a family. I have a single room, apart from kitchen and bathroom, smaller than a friend's bedroom. I have tools and a folding bench in the attic, but not easy to do much even there. Temperature varies a lot, could not run a 3D printer without building a temp controlled box for it.

Hmm, combine fair with a hands-on science show?

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24-08-2016, 12:07 PM
RE: Makers fairs
(24-08-2016 09:59 AM)Gloucester Wrote:  
(24-08-2016 09:31 AM)tomilay Wrote:  My guess is a lot of potentially consequential tinkerers have wound up in well paying careers, promoted to senior management. A nice office. Deadlines. Fetching secretary. A not too shabby portfolio. Among other trappings associated with doing well in this century. Rare is the boss that tinkers. That tinkering threatens to go the way of the dodo is not a notion entirely without basis.

We are at the moment firmly anchored on the discoveries that happened at the turn of the last century. The early 1900s.

Can't agree with some if that, though many innovative people have been sucked into the system, the establishment or fallen for the root of all evil. The "real" inmovators just want to be in the labor workshop. I turned down promotion because it would have changed my job dramatically. Actually would not have paid much more.

Not sure what your last sentence means, there are fundamentals that we can't improve on much. Removing metals, say, has moved on from carving chunks off with sharp tools and loads of mechanical effort, we now have laser and plasma cutting, plus "water lasers" cutting stone, plastics etc.

3D printing is beginning to take over from casting and other ancient techniques.

There's a whole thread worth in comparing old and new. Even without touching on medical equipment.

That last sentence. I had in mind Albert Einstein's insights. In retrospect, it may not be fair to expect such things every century. But a lot of other non-gradual discoveries are made around that time.

We have to remember that what we observe is not nature herself, but nature exposed to our method of questioning ~ Werner Heisenberg
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