Mammals during the age of the dinosaurs?
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18-02-2014, 02:32 PM
RE: Mammals during the age of the dinosaurs?
(09-02-2014 03:27 PM)ghostexorcist Wrote:  I have a PDF of a book about the origin of mammals if anyone is interested.

Yes! Smile PM me please!

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19-02-2014, 04:26 AM
RE: Mammals during the age of the dinosaurs?
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20-02-2014, 01:08 AM
RE: Mammals during the age of the dinosaurs?
There is a controversy amongs the scientific community, whether mammals lived alongside dinosaurs or whether they emerged after the asteroid impact and the extinction of the dinosaurs. The reason for this is because there are two contradicotry sets of data

Have a look at this Nature news article about the current "debate over which mammals roamed with dinosaurs". You can find additional scientific references in the article.

Here is a paper, again from the scientific journal "Nature", presenting findings to support the claim that an adaptive radiation of Multituberculata began at least 20 million years before the extinction of non-avian dinosaurs.

And finally, here is a review, again from "Nature", on early mammalian evolution, which states that mammals filled in a niche as nocturnal Insectivores during the Mesozoic age and performed rapid adaptive radiation after the extinction of non-avian dinosaurs.

"Whether or to what extent the lineage splitting is correlated with morphological and ecological diversification is a question with broad implications for macroevolution. Marsupials and placentals, the two main groups that make up 99% of all extant mammal species, show great ecomorphological diversity, and most of their orders have unique ecological specializations correlated with distinctive morphological traits. There is no question that this spectacular ecomorphological diversification accelerated in an Early Cenozoic adaptive radiation of mammals into the niches vacated on the extinction of non-avian dinosaurs."

Fun "paradox": The higher the selection pressure, the slower evolution takes place.
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22-02-2014, 02:51 PM
RE: Mammals during the age of the dinosaurs?
(09-02-2014 03:27 PM)ghostexorcist Wrote:  I have a PDF of a book about the origin of mammals if anyone is interested.

can i have it as well

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23-02-2014, 10:39 PM
RE: Mammals during the age of the dinosaurs?
(22-02-2014 02:51 PM)ThePaleolithicFreethinker Wrote:  
(09-02-2014 03:27 PM)ghostexorcist Wrote:  I have a PDF of a book about the origin of mammals if anyone is interested.

can i have it as well

Anyone who wants it needs to send me their email.
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24-02-2014, 12:16 AM
RE: Mammals during the age of the dinosaurs?
http://www.sci-news.com/paleontology/sci...01295.html

Quote:Megaconus, a terrestrial animal about the size of a large ground squirrel, is estimated to weigh about 0.25 kg. It was likely an omnivore, possessing clearly mammalian dental features and jaw hinge. Its molars had elaborate rows of cusps for chewing on plants, and some of its anterior teeth possessed large cusps that allowed it to eat insects and worms, perhaps even other small vertebrates. It had teeth with high crowns and fused roots similar to more modern, but unrelated, mammalian species such as rodents. Its high-crowned teeth also appeared to be slow growing like modern placental mammals.

The skeleton of Megaconus, especially its hind-leg bones and finger claws, likely gave it a gait similar to modern armadillos, a previously unknown type of locomotion in mammaliaforms.

However, the paleontologists identified clearly non-mammalian characteristics as well. Its primitive middle ear, still attached to the jaw, was reptile-like. Its anklebones and vertebral column are also similar to the anatomy of previously known mammal-like reptiles.

“We cannot say that Megaconus is our direct ancestor, but it certainly looks like a great-great-grand uncle 165 million years removed.

Must be another of those "transitional fossils" that the creatards insist do not exist.

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