Martial arts.
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06-04-2016, 03:12 AM
Martial arts.
I kind of take martial arts seriously, having devoted a large portion of my life to it. This can be seen in a wrestling thread I destroyed earlier today.

My bad.

Anyway, I love it but can no longer practice it due to injury and illness. So I am a bit frustrated.

Over the years I did many styles and discovered that everybody thought the style they had chosen was the best. I thought this rather an odd idea. I told myself there were so many variations, there had to be many styles to cover it all. Much like music.

I'll list some of the styles I did. I would very much like to hear from military personal as well and what it is they learned. I studied with an ex SAS soldier for a time and it was great.

Also anyone else who perhaps did karate, or boxed, wrestled etc.

Here is a short list of my styles.
ITF Tae Kwon Do. 4th dan. (Tae is pronounced Tay, NOT Tie. My Korean girlfriend was adamant!)
WTF Tae kwon do. 1st dan.
Tang soo do. 2nd dan.
Hapkido. 1st dan.
Muay Thai. 10 years.
Xing Yi Quan. Master.
Boxing. 2 years.
Hung Gar. 3 years.
Shotokan karate. 7 years.
Etc etc etc.

In this thread we can discuss current fighting events, movies etc.

I hope people enjoy it and discuss this interesting artform. Plus it's a place to vent my frustration without hurting other threads. Wink

NOTE: Member, Tomasia uses this site to slander other individuals. He then later proclaims it a joke, but not in public.
I will call him a liar and a dog here and now.
Banjo.
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06-04-2016, 05:17 AM
RE: Martial arts.
I dunno -- kaboom beats karate in my book.

....

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06-04-2016, 05:26 AM
RE: Martial arts.
(06-04-2016 05:17 AM)onlinebiker Wrote:  I dunno -- kaboom beats karate in my book.

....

It depends. The great Hwang Jang Li killed a soldier who had a rifle in his back during the Vietnam war. Disarmed him and kicked him in the head.

Kaboom is the coward's way. At least in my book.

NOTE: Member, Tomasia uses this site to slander other individuals. He then later proclaims it a joke, but not in public.
I will call him a liar and a dog here and now.
Banjo.
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06-04-2016, 05:45 AM
RE: Martial arts.
I did karate for a bit in high school, I'm taking Krav Maga classes now. I love it, definitely empowering. I feel a lot safer in various situations knowing I have an ability to protect myself. My instructor's not bad to look at either Wink

For martial arts movies, I liked Kill Bill, Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon, Enter the Dragon, and the Karate Kid (Ralph Macchio was the subject of my crushes back in the day Wink )
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06-04-2016, 05:48 AM (This post was last modified: 06-04-2016 07:35 AM by Loom.)
RE: Martial arts.
I did some Tai Chi for about a year to help cope with anxiety. I won't be able to fight anyone worth a darn but...it was definetly fun and relaxing Tongue

Kinda wish I spent more of my childhood on martial arts and gymnastics. I really wanna try doing parkour but I haven't even got the coordination to properly vault the railing of our porch xD

Ignorance is not to be ignored.

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06-04-2016, 07:24 AM
RE: Martial arts.
Oh my FSM, so cute Smile

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06-04-2016, 07:29 AM
RE: Martial arts.
Martial arts have always been a big part of my life, and for more than one reason.

But first, in regards to the whole gun vs. martial art thing that inevitably comes up Tongue:

... The two do not have to be in contradiction to each other. While a gun is usually a more practical choice when the option is available and the outcome of using it acceptable, this is not always the case. And on the other side of the debate, cowardice has nothing to do with the choice. Not for me, anyway. It's purely a matter of what works and what does not. As a soldier, the idea of me running into a modern battlefield with the intent of favoring hand to hand combat over a firearm would be absolutely ludicrous. An outlier here and there where it works does not change that. Even in the days of the samurai, going into combat empty handed was a last resort.

That said, there are certainly many situations, both in the military and in the civilian world, where martial arts are applicable. Contrary to popular belief, we do not run around killing everything we see. Whether searching potentially dangerous people at a checkpoint or taking people into custody who have surrendered, we have frequent hand to hand contact with potential hostiles in situations where getting to a firearm in a spur of the moment encounter might not be possible.

Back in civilization, it's all the more critical. When working in corrections, for example, which I'll be returning to in about a month, all those ground control and joint manipulation techniques are put to use on a near daily basis. Obviously during actual altercations, but also in other encounters one wouldn't necessarily define as a fight. When I'm up close and vulnerable during a patdown, if I didn't know what to look for, the first sign of a hostile inmate might be their elbow slamming into my head. But as someone who has spent the last 20 years in various martial arts, it's become instinctive to pay attention to their posture, the way they're balancing themselves, etc. If they're going to take a swing at me, thanks to martial arts I'm going to intuitively pick up on it and react before they actually take the swing. If I'm trying to cuff someone after an altercation, understanding how every joint works aids me in controlling them with minimal use of force and without injuring them, helping to ensure both their safety and mine.

But beyond all the practical stuff, it's always always been an important part of my social network. You might say martial arts takes the place of religion, in a way. I take part in community events put on by the school, hang out with people I train with, etc. While I don't believe in concepts like qi, I'd say practicing martial arts is nonetheless about the closest to spirituality I'm going to find without actually become spiritual.

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06-04-2016, 07:39 AM
RE: Martial arts.
(06-04-2016 07:29 AM)yakherder Wrote:  Martial arts have always been a big part of my life, and for more than one reason.

But first, in regards to the whole gun vs. martial art thing that inevitably comes up Tongue:

... The two do not have to be in contradiction to each other. While a gun is usually a more practical choice when the option is available and the outcome of using it acceptable, this is not always the case. And on the other side of the debate, cowardice has nothing to do with the choice. Not for me, anyway. It's purely a matter of what works and what does not. As a soldier, the idea of me running into a modern battlefield with the intent of favoring hand to hand combat over a firearm would be absolutely ludicrous. An outlier here and there where it works does not change that. Even in the days of the samurai, going into combat empty handed was a last resort.

That said, there are certainly many situations, both in the military and in the civilian world, where martial arts are applicable. Contrary to popular belief, we do not run around killing everything we see. Whether searching potentially dangerous people at a checkpoint or taking people into custody who have surrendered, we have frequent hand to hand contact with potential hostiles in situations where getting to a firearm in a spur of the moment encounter might not be possible.

Back in civilization, it's all the more critical. When working in corrections, for example, which I'll be returning to in about a month, all those ground control and joint manipulation techniques are put to use on a near daily basis. Obviously during actual altercations, but also in other encounters one wouldn't necessarily define as a fight. When I'm up close and vulnerable during a patdown, if I didn't know what to look for, the first sign of a hostile inmate might be their elbow slamming into my head. But as someone who has spent the last 20 years in various martial arts, it's become instinctive to pay attention to their posture, the way they're balancing themselves, etc. If they're going to take a swing at me, thanks to martial arts I'm going to intuitively pick up on it and react before they actually take the swing. If I'm trying to cuff someone after an altercation, understanding how every joint works aids me in controlling them with minimal use of force and without injuring them, helping to ensure both their safety and mine.

But beyond all the practical stuff, it's always always been an important part of my social network. You might say martial arts takes the place of religion, in a way. I take part in community events put on by the school, hang out with people I train with, etc. While I don't believe in concepts like qi, I'd say practicing martial arts is nonetheless about the closest to spirituality I'm going to find without actually become spiritual.

I feel that way about yoga in terms of spirituality without actually being spiritual.

As a woman, I like being able to know what it feels like to hit, punch, kick a guy who's bigger than me. I think all women should take classes like these. I would always try to get away from a precarious situation first, but if I can't, I like knowing I have some level of skill to protect myself. If I have a daughter, she would definitely be taking martial arts classes like the little girl in the gif.
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06-04-2016, 07:53 AM
RE: Martial arts.
(06-04-2016 07:39 AM)jennybee Wrote:  
(06-04-2016 07:29 AM)yakherder Wrote:  Martial arts have always been a big part of my life, and for more than one reason.

But first, in regards to the whole gun vs. martial art thing that inevitably comes up Tongue:

... The two do not have to be in contradiction to each other. While a gun is usually a more practical choice when the option is available and the outcome of using it acceptable, this is not always the case. And on the other side of the debate, cowardice has nothing to do with the choice. Not for me, anyway. It's purely a matter of what works and what does not. As a soldier, the idea of me running into a modern battlefield with the intent of favoring hand to hand combat over a firearm would be absolutely ludicrous. An outlier here and there where it works does not change that. Even in the days of the samurai, going into combat empty handed was a last resort.

That said, there are certainly many situations, both in the military and in the civilian world, where martial arts are applicable. Contrary to popular belief, we do not run around killing everything we see. Whether searching potentially dangerous people at a checkpoint or taking people into custody who have surrendered, we have frequent hand to hand contact with potential hostiles in situations where getting to a firearm in a spur of the moment encounter might not be possible.

Back in civilization, it's all the more critical. When working in corrections, for example, which I'll be returning to in about a month, all those ground control and joint manipulation techniques are put to use on a near daily basis. Obviously during actual altercations, but also in other encounters one wouldn't necessarily define as a fight. When I'm up close and vulnerable during a patdown, if I didn't know what to look for, the first sign of a hostile inmate might be their elbow slamming into my head. But as someone who has spent the last 20 years in various martial arts, it's become instinctive to pay attention to their posture, the way they're balancing themselves, etc. If they're going to take a swing at me, thanks to martial arts I'm going to intuitively pick up on it and react before they actually take the swing. If I'm trying to cuff someone after an altercation, understanding how every joint works aids me in controlling them with minimal use of force and without injuring them, helping to ensure both their safety and mine.

But beyond all the practical stuff, it's always always been an important part of my social network. You might say martial arts takes the place of religion, in a way. I take part in community events put on by the school, hang out with people I train with, etc. While I don't believe in concepts like qi, I'd say practicing martial arts is nonetheless about the closest to spirituality I'm going to find without actually become spiritual.

I feel that way about yoga in terms of spirituality without actually being spiritual.

As a woman, I like being able to know what it feels like to hit, punch, kick a guy who's bigger than me. I think all women should take classes like these. I would always try to get away from a precarious situation first, but if I can't, I like knowing I have some level of skill to protect myself. If I have a daughter, she would definitely be taking martial arts classes like the little girl in the gif.

I'm anxious to get my son into it. Most of the places around here will accept kids starting at age 5. But now that I'm going to be going back to corrections, that will mean moving to Ottawa and therefore changing schools.

Looking at this one. The lineup of instructors includes both one specialized in training military and law enforcement and one specialized in training kids. One of the guys who runs it was also a former IDF marine. Anxious to check out the facility Smile

'Murican Canadian
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06-04-2016, 08:09 AM
RE: Martial arts.
(06-04-2016 07:53 AM)yakherder Wrote:  
(06-04-2016 07:39 AM)jennybee Wrote:  I feel that way about yoga in terms of spirituality without actually being spiritual.

As a woman, I like being able to know what it feels like to hit, punch, kick a guy who's bigger than me. I think all women should take classes like these. I would always try to get away from a precarious situation first, but if I can't, I like knowing I have some level of skill to protect myself. If I have a daughter, she would definitely be taking martial arts classes like the little girl in the gif.

I'm anxious to get my son into it. Most of the places around here will accept kids starting at age 5. But now that I'm going to be going back to corrections, that will mean moving to Ottawa and therefore changing schools.

Looking at this one. The lineup of instructors includes both one specialized in training military and law enforcement and one specialized in training kids. One of the guys who runs it was also a former IDF marine. Anxious to check out the facility Smile

That looks like a nice place. It looks like that guy has a lot of experience. The younger they learn the better, imo. So much easier to learn things when you are very young it seems and things just become second nature so much easier. And unfortunately, I do think we live in a society where kids/teens (esp. teen girls) should know how to protect themselves.

Since I've been doing KM, I am much more aware of how (some) women react to physical altercations vs. men. I take two types of classes one straightforward KM and one geared specifically for women's self defense. I noticed some of the newer women say "sorry" when hitting the "male attacker." I have never heard a male newbie do this once in any of the classes. It's ingrained in society that women should be the weaker sex. I mean, I understand physically in some ways we are, but it doesn't help that society reinforces this thinking as well. I think women need to know they can hit back without being sorry. I'm glad my instructor always tells them to stop saying sorry for hitting back and start kicking ass.

I grew up wrestling with three brothers so I'm kind of used to that type of thing and we still enjoy throwing each other around even as adults when I go back for a visit. Big Grin Last time I went home we broke my mom's antique couch from rough housing Laugh out load But not all women have that type of upbringing and I think all women should take it upon themselves to learn how to protect themselves, that's what we should be teaching our daughters--not this I'm sorry bullshit. Wink
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